Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History – UTD Leonardo Initiatives “Generation 1: Chronicles of the Art-and-Technology Vanguard”

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History  – UTD Leonardo Initiatives “Generation 1: Chronicles of the Art-and-Technology Vanguard”

 

The University of Texas at Dallas’ new Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History    (EODIAH) and the Leonardo Initiatives of ATEC at UTD are pleased to announce

the Leonardo Generation 1 Project, an open and expanding archive of the foundational forces in art-and-technology media hybrids.

 http://www.dallasnews.com/business/columnists/robert-miller/20141028-ut-dallas-to-inaugurate-edith-odonnell-institute-of-art-history.ece 

 

The Leonardo Generation 1 Project chronicles the multi-perspectival merger between technology and art from the 1950s through the 1980s.  Generation 1 amplifies the voices of pioneering and influential artists, engineers, curators, and key organizations through a growing databank of written first-person accounts and podcast recordings. The project seeks to document the experiences of those most closely involved in the creation of digital art, new media art, and computer art using the tools of the digital humanities. Leonardo Generation 1 shares the unique perspectives of the new media/computational vanguard in a style that is at once embracing and accessible, intellectually rigorous yet casual. This new project is aimed at uncovering a rich, if somewhat underappreciated, time in art history by recording the memories of the pioneers who are still alive.

 

The Generation 1 Project is part of the Leonardo Pioneers and Pathbreakers project of the Observatoire Leonardo des Arts et Techno-Sciences in Paris, and in collaboration with its director, Annick Bureaud. Memoirs are being published both on the Pioneers and Pathbreakers website athttp://olats.org/pionniers/pionniers.php and in the Leonardo Journal art history section edited by Prof David Carrier: http://leonardo.info/leoinfo.html

 

Recorded discussions with pioneers will be featured on the Pioneers and Pathbreakers channel on the Creative Disturbance art science technology collaboration platform

 

http://creativedisturbance.org/channel/pioneers-and-pathbreakers/

 

The co-directors of the Generation 1 Project are Professor Roger Malina, an affiliate faculty member of the EODIAH and an ATEC Distinguished Chair at the University of Texas at Dallas, and Dr. Charissa Terranova, an Associate Professor of Art History in EODIAH. The project is coordinated by ATEC ArtSciLab Research Fellow, Poe Johnson, a University of Texas at Dallas PhD student. Their varied perspectives and skill sets embody the hybridity of the memoirs project itself, and the philosophy of University of Texas at Dallas ATEC and Arts & Humanities programs.

 

Among the recent memoirs are an inside account of the workings of Bell Labs from A Michael Noll, Helen and Newton Harrison about their early work in art and environment, Frieder Nake a pioneering German computer artist, Trudy Reagan about the early days of the YLEM organization.

 

Submissions for the Pioneers and Pathbreakers memoir project are decided and peer reviewed by The Frieda Ackerman Committee: Marc Battier, Paul Brown, Annick Bureaud, David Carrier, Joel Chadabe, Anne Collins, Eduardo Kac, Roger Malina, Patrick McCray, Frieder Nake, Louise Poissant, Eddie Shanken, and Charissa Terranova. The call for memoirs is available at http://leonardo.info/isast/journal/calls/pioneers.html.

Unknowables, are they Pseudo Science, or Pseudo Art ?

Colleagues

I just posted this about unknowables in science on our YASMIN discussion on

the Super Natural in art science

Follow the discussion at http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/

Join and post to the discussion at; http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions

Roger Malina

aprille, glenn, martha, lilian and several other yasminers

As a scientist ( physics then astrophysics) I am very comortable
of unknowables that are developed within science and mathematics

the most obvious of these is goedel’s theorem in math and i have lived
all my life with the understanding that certain things in the universe
are unknowable- eg beyond the event horizon in general relativity
eg you cant know even theoretically about the internal stucture
of a black hole (or before the big bang) because signals cant
get out- you can know the mass and charge, angular momentum
of a black hole but
not about much more ( the famous ‘no hair’ problem)
yeah i know that stephen hawkin has been nibbling away at this

in complexity theory ( not my field) we understand that we cannot
predict in detail the future state of a complex system derived from
the interaction rules between the components- because certain
properties are ‘emergent”

I found this interesting article by John Casti of the Santa Fe Institute
on The Outer Limits: In Search of the “Unknowable” in Science

http://www.santafe.edu/media/workingpapers/96-01-001.pdf

Casti talks about a number of unknowables such as Alan Turing’s
Halting Problem.,

interestingly he talks about the Heiseberg uncertainty principal
which i had thought argues that one cannot know to infinite precision
both the location and velocity of a quantum particle- Casti argues
this might be a mathematical limit to understanding not a physical limit

he discusses at some length whether some things are fundamentally
“uncomputable” – we recently argued at length with mathematician
and computer artist frieder nake who feels strongly that many
pheonena are theoretically uncomputable

he describes the problem as one of mapping either mathemical models or
computer models on to the natural world

i am very comfortable
with the idea that certain things about the world
are supernatural in the sense that they can not be modelled either
with mathematics or computer models= or are theoretically unobservable
such as the interior structure of a black hole

of course this use of the word super natural is not the common one
and could be misleading

like paul i dont think pseudo science enters into this discussion
but i must admit Lilian has got me thinking about pseudo art

my friend and physics colleague jean marc levy leblond indeed
would argue that most art science is pseudo art !!

roger malina

 

Announcing a Yasmin Discussion: beginning Oct 15 2014

The Plight of the Supernatural in an Art-Science World

To Contribute to and follow the YASMIN discussion, Join:

http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
To Follow the YASMIN discussion, without posting, subscribe:

http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/

 

We are pleased to announce a LeonardoYASMIN discussion on the topic of the “supernatural” as a concept, as it relates to science, to pseudo-science, and to the pairing of art with science. The discussion will commence the week of October 15. Some preliminary questions to ponder are:

 

  • What if any at all, specious or not, is the relationship between the supernatural which is understood to be a religious/magical concept, and post-Newtonian contemporary physics whose deep mysteries challenge our understanding of “natural” as a scientific concept?

 

  • The rise of Art-Science should not ignore the stunning fact that most of the planet’s population, including some scientists and likely many artists, continues to believe that a dualistic material nature and magical supernature co-exist, and that the latter out-rules the former in its stewardship of the Cosmos. Such belief is manifest in contemporary versions of ancient myths.

 

  • To science, the supernatural is a non-concept — it does not exist, since it is not amenable to the scientific method. It is indistinguishable from fantasy and the imaginary. Its exclusion is a central premise of science, which would never abandon an investigation of the confusing physics of dark matter, for example, by declaring those mysteries to lie on the other side of a natural/supernatural divide.  Can the supernatural, to the extent that it represents mystery and the unknown, be naturalized? Could religion continue its mission without the concept of a supernatural universe?

 

  • To what definition of “science” does art connect in the art-science enterprise, if it does not also, like science, dismiss the supernatural as a fiction?

 

  • Is there an art-pseudoscience movement concealed within the art-science movement?

 

  • The sustainability of the traditional definition of the supernatural is in trouble. Art, which has the capacity to endow that which is material with poetic, transcendent, and emotional qualities, has paired up with science. Could it eventually make religion as we know it obsolete? Can art provide for a sensation of “the spiritual” in a non-supernatural paradigm? Scientist Stuart Kauffman has argued that the sciences of complexity allows us to ‘re-invent the sacred”.

 

  • Concepts once considered paranormal or supernatural and “outside of science” such as remote viewing, are now enabled by distance viewing technologies available on every cell phone.

 

  • What intellectual domain “owns” a legitimate discussion of the existence or non-existence of the supernatural? Most would say religion and theology – but neither of those can provide any actual information about the supernatural, a concept that is central to their beliefs – not what it is, where it is, or how it works. Religion and theology do not own the supernatural discourse any more than they did the question of which orbits the other, the Earth or the Sun.

 

  • In terms of its art historical roots, how does art-science relate to the gradual decline of belief in the supernatural over the last two centuries, beginning with 19th century art’s deconstruction of illusionistic space in painting and its relocation of avant-garde aesthetics to real space (the same space that science studies)?

 

The Discussion Moderator is Stephen Nowlin, Vice President, Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, where he is director of the Alyce de Roulet Williamson Gallery. His curatorial practice emphasizes the intersection of art and science.

http://williamsongallery.net/google .

 

Discussants will include:

 

Nancy Lowe, artist, catalyst for art-science collaborations

Director of Symbiosis Art+Science Alliance (symbASA)

http://symbasa.org .

 

Margaret Wertheim

Author, “Physics on the Fringe,” co-curator, “Crochet Coral Reef”

Director, The Institute For Figuring, Los Angeles

http://theiff.org

 

Andres Collazo, PhD

Biologist

Director, Beckman Institute Biological Imaging Center

California Institute of Technology

http://bioimaging.caltech.edu

Daniel  Lewis, PhD

Author, Curator

Chief Curator of Manuscripts (History of Science, Medicine, and Technology)

Huntington Library, Art Collection, and Botanical Gardens

http://huntington.org

 

 

Joseph Klein, DMus

Distinguished Teaching Professor

Chair, Division of Composition Studies

University of North Texas College of Music

http://music.unt.edu/comp/josephklein/

 

Martha Blassnigg, PhD

Reader in the Anthropology of Media | Transtechnology Research |  Editor, Transtechnology Research Open Access Papers | Associate Editor, Leonardo Reviews and L|R|Q * Plymouth University

http://www5.plymouth.ac.uk/staff/martha-blassnigg

 

To Contribute to the YASMIN discussion, Join:

http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
To Follow the YASMIN discussion subscribe:

 

http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/

 

Leonardo discussion on culture and games, ethnography, behavioural sciences

Leonardo discussion on culture and games, ethnography, behavioural sciences

 

Beginning this week, Richard Wirth, the recipient of the Fall 2014 Leonardo Fellowship, will be blogging on Leonardo On-line! Wirth is the very first Leonardo Fellow. As a guest editor of the Leonardo On-line blog, Wirth will aim to highlight current topics of discussion within game studies, analyzing design elements and player cultures through the lens of ethnography and behavioral sciences. Find out more
http://leonardo.info/blogs/

invitation to leonardo dinner in dallas saturday october 11 2014

Leonardo dinner in Dallas saturday october 11-

 

during the meeting of the Society for Literature Science Arts and Literature

 

after the plenary lecture

 

if you would like to attend contact roger malina

rmalina@alum.mit.edu

 

NOTE- we are nearly full- pleasae contact me if you would

like to be invited

 

we are at the Fishmarket Restaurant

http://www.dallasfishmarket.com/

 

We will be there until 11 pm or later so feel free to

come early and leave late, or any other combination.

 

Feel free just to drop by for drinks.

 

Attendees will include Ellen Levy, former President of the College Art
Association,
Art-Science faculty Meredith Tromble from the San Francisco Art
Institute,

Wendy Silk
from the Art Science Fusion program at UC Davis,
of Art and Design,

Jack Ox from the University of New Mexico, Ruth
West from UNT,

Luciano Chessa San Franciso Conservatory of Music
Oron Catts from Symbiotica in Australia, bioart artist Adam Zaretsky Scot Gresham Lancaster of UTD

Drhu Deb

Louis Burns

 

 

and others

 

 

The Plight of the Supernatural in an Art-Science World

Announcing a Yasmin Discussion: beginning Oct 15 2014

The Plight of the Supernatural in an Art-Science World

To Contribute to and follow the YASMIN discussion, Join:

http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
To Follow the YASMIN discussion, without posting, subscribe:

http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/

 

We are pleased to announce a LeonardoYASMIN discussion on the topic of the “supernatural” as a concept, as it relates to science, to pseudo-science, and to the pairing of art with science. The discussion will commence the week of October 15. Some preliminary questions to ponder are:

 

  • What if any at all, specious or not, is the relationship between the supernatural which is understood to be a religious/magical concept, and post-Newtonian contemporary physics whose deep mysteries challenge our understanding of “natural” as a scientific concept?

 

  • The rise of Art-Science should not ignore the stunning fact that most of the planet’s population, including some scientists and likely many artists, continues to believe that a dualistic material nature and magical supernature co-exist, and that the latter out-rules the former in its stewardship of the Cosmos. Such belief is manifest in contemporary versions of ancient myths.

 

  • To science, the supernatural is a non-concept — it does not exist, since it is not amenable to the scientific method. It is indistinguishable from fantasy and the imaginary. Its exclusion is a central premise of science, which would never abandon an investigation of the confusing physics of dark matter, for example, by declaring those mysteries to lie on the other side of a natural/supernatural divide.  Can the supernatural, to the extent that it represents mystery and the unknown, be naturalized? Could religion continue its mission without the concept of a supernatural universe?

 

  • To what definition of “science” does art connect in the art-science enterprise, if it does not also, like science, dismiss the supernatural as a fiction?

 

  • Is there an art-pseudoscience movement concealed within the art-science movement?

 

  • The sustainability of the traditional definition of the supernatural is in trouble. Art, which has the capacity to endow that which is material with poetic, transcendent, and emotional qualities, has paired up with science. Could it eventually make religion as we know it obsolete? Can art provide for a sensation of “the spiritual” in a non-supernatural paradigm? Scientist Stuart Kauffman has argued that the sciences of complexity allows us to ‘re-invent the sacred”.

 

  • Concepts once considered paranormal or supernatural and “outside of science” such as remote viewing, are now enabled by distance viewing technologies available on every cell phone.

 

  • What intellectual domain “owns” a legitimate discussion of the existence or non-existence of the supernatural? Most would say religion and theology – but neither of those can provide any actual information about the supernatural, a concept that is central to their beliefs – not what it is, where it is, or how it works. Religion and theology do not own the supernatural discourse any more than they did the question of which orbits the other, the Earth or the Sun.

 

  • In terms of its art historical roots, how does art-science relate to the gradual decline of belief in the supernatural over the last two centuries, beginning with 19th century art’s deconstruction of illusionistic space in painting and its relocation of avant-garde aesthetics to real space (the same space that science studies)?

 

The Discussion Moderator is Stephen Nowlin, Vice President, Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, where he is director of the Alyce de Roulet Williamson Gallery. His curatorial practice emphasizes the intersection of art and science.

http://williamsongallery.net/google .

 

Discussants will include:

 

Nancy Lowe, artist, catalyst for art-science collaborations

Director of Symbiosis Art+Science Alliance (symbASA)

http://symbasa.org .

 

Margaret Wertheim

Author, “Physics on the Fringe,” co-curator, “Crochet Coral Reef”

Director, The Institute For Figuring, Los Angeles

http://theiff.org

 

Andres Collazo, PhD

Biologist

Director, Beckman Institute Biological Imaging Center

California Institute of Technology

http://bioimaging.caltech.edu

Daniel  Lewis, PhD

Author, Curator

Chief Curator of Manuscripts (History of Science, Medicine, and Technology)

Huntington Library, Art Collection, and Botanical Gardens

http://huntington.org

 

 

Joseph Klein, DMus

Distinguished Teaching Professor

Chair, Division of Composition Studies

University of North Texas College of Music

http://music.unt.edu/comp/josephklein/

 

Martha Blassnigg, PhD

Reader in the Anthropology of Media | Transtechnology Research |  Editor, Transtechnology Research Open Access Papers | Associate Editor, Leonardo Reviews and L|R|Q * Plymouth University

http://www5.plymouth.ac.uk/staff/martha-blassnigg

 

To Contribute to the YASMIN discussion, Join:

http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
To Follow the YASMIN discussion subscribe:

 

http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/

 

Tim Perkis appointed Research Fellow in UTD ATEC ArtSciLab

,TIm Perkis named as a Research Fellow in ArtSciLab!

 

http://texashats.org/artscilab/2014/09/28/tim-perkis-named-as-a-research-fellow-in-artscilab/
Tim Perkis is a researcher, engineer, musician and filmmaker, who has
been working primarily in the field of digital sound for decades. As a
musician, he is a founder of The Hub, a pioneering group in the field
of computer network music, as well as a internationally-known
performer of improvised music, having worked with many of the leading
figures in the field in North America, Europe and Japan. He has
taught at the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) and the
California College of the Arts (CCA)and has been resident
artist/researcher at Mills College in Oakland California, Xerox
Corporation’s Palo Alto Research Center, Paul Allen’s legendary
thinktank, Interval Research, and at the Mediterranean Institute of
Advanced Research (IMéRA) of the University of Aix-Marseille in
France. As an engineer he has designed tools, toys and software for a
variety of corporate clients, including Mattel, Sony, and Sennheiser,
and consulted with the San Francisco Airport and Art Commission as an
expert on technology-based art. He is also producer and director of a
feature-length documentary on musicians and sound artists in the San
Francisco Bay area called NOISY PEOPLE (2007). His music is available
on over a dozen labels, including Tzadik(USA), EMANEM(UK), and
Creative Sources (Portugal).
Perkis is collaborating with ArtScilab on the Connectome Data
Dramatisation Project

Nino Calos, artist collaborator of frank malina

Nino Calos, artist collaborator of frank malina

RCM GALERIE vous invitent le jeudi 9 Octobre 2014 à partir de 18H au vernissage de l’exposition : Nino Calos, œuvres lumineuses des années 1960.

RCM GALERIE is pleased to invite you Thursday October 9 from 6 pm to the private view of the exhibit : Nino Calos, light works from the 1960s.

L’invitation est ci-joint.

Invite attached.

Best regards,
Robert Murphy.

recto: Mobile lumineux 110, 69 x 69 x 14 cm, bois, plexiglas, moteur, lumière, 1965
RCM Galerie
32, rue de Lille, 75007 Paris
01 40 15 00 23 / 06 85 30 11 96
www.rcmgalerie.com / rcmgalerie@yahoo.fr
robert et camille murphy
seront heureux de vous inviter
à l’exposition
vernissage :
jeudi 9 octobre 2014
de 18 h à 21 h
exposition :
du 9 au 30 octobre 2014
nino calos

Richard Wirth Named Leonardo Fellow

http://www.leonardo.info/isast/leofellowship.html

 

Richard Wirth has been named as a Leonardo Felloow

With is a Master’s candidate in the Arts and Technology program at the University of Texas at Dallas. Richard’s fellowship will be designed around his research of MMORPGs (Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games) as interactive storytelling environments, comparing the function of secondary oral media across different modes of social interaction through the lens of video game ethnography. During his fellowship, Richard will explore Leonardo publications for his writings and research and also will serve as a guest editor of the Leonardo On-Line blog, among other activities.

The Leonardo Fellowship program recognizes accomplished graduate students and junior faculty from Leonardo Senior Affiliate organizations. Selected Leonardo Fellows will have an opportunity to advance their selected research or project area through such activities as publishing in the internationally renowned Leonardo journal or creating a unique art-science project under the auspices of Leonardo, as well as to receive mentorship from senior Leonardo editors. The Leonardo Fellowship includes a cash stipend of $1,000 (U.S.).

Throughout its history, Leonardo has presented the work of renowned international theorists, artists, scientists, curators and other practitioners of contemporary art involving 20th- and 21st-century media. The Leonardo Archive, spanning nearly 50 years, provides a rich basis for exploration of the genesis of art-science work, from the introduction of pioneering applications in kinetic art, computer animation, net art, interactive, telematic, algorithmic and genetic art, environmental, bio and land art to more recent artistic applications in nano art, CAVE installation work, augmented reality, artificial intelligence, wearables, sound art, cloud-based art and beyond.

Fellowships may be realized in a variety of possible forms, such as (but not limited to):

  • Guest-editing a themed special section in Leonardo journal
  • Curating a Leonardo Gallery devoted to work in the field of art-science-technology
  • Researching a topic area drawing on the 50-year Leonardo archive, leading to publication of an article in Leonardojournal or Leonardo On-Line
  • Or another project that utilizes the content or other resources of the Leonardo Network.

The creativity of the proposal will be a factor in the selection of Leonardo Fellows.Leonardo Fellows will also have opportunities to interface with the Leonardo community:

  • One month as a guest editor of the Leonardo On-Line Blog
  • Opportunity to speak at a Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous (LASER) event.

Note: Submitted writings and projects are subject to editorial review and are not guaranteed to be published.

Who is eligible?
During the announced nomination period, Leonardo Senior Affiliate Members may nominate one (1) graduate student for the Fall Fellowship and one (1) junior faculty member for the Spring Fellowship.

What is a Senior Affiliate Member?
A Senior Affiliate Member is a paying member institution, department, lab or organization that is creating work in the intersection of art, science and technology. For more information about the many benefits of joining the Leonardo Affliate Program, please see www.leonardo.info/affiliates.

The nomination process:
We accept nominations twice a year for the two fellowships: an autumn fellowship for a graduate student and a spring fellowship for a junior faculty member.

Step 1
Nomination period opens and is announced by the Leonardo Affiliate Program. Senior Affiliates are invited submit a nomination.

Step 2
The Leonardo Senior Affiliate nominator sends a preliminary email to Leonardo/ISAST indicating the name
and position of the organization’s nominee and his/her contact information and including the nominator’s letter of
recommendation in support of the nominee.

Step 3
Upon acknowledgmentand request by Leonardo/ISAST, the nominee submits a project proposal as well as a resume and
writing sample for consideration.

Where and when is the fellowship?
The fellowships are conducted remotely, with periodic telephone or video contact with the Leonardo editors. The duration of each fellowship is either one academic quarter or semester. One fellowship takes place at a time, rotating between the graduate student and the junior faculty fellowship.

Does the fellowship offer a stipend?
We offer a $1,000 stipend, awarded at the beginning of the fellowship project.

Have more questions?
Contact Danielle Siembieda, Leonardo Affiliate Manager, danielle@leonardo.info

Timeline of Spring 2015 Fellowship (Junior Faculty Members)

October 15, 2014:  Fellowship Nomination Period Announced (for Fall: Graduate Student Nominations Only)
November 15, 2014:  Fellowship Nominations and supporting materials due
December 15, 2014:  Materials From Nominee Due
January 15, 2015:  Fall Fellowship Awardee announced
February 15, 2015:  Fall Fellowship begins
April 30, 2015:  Fall Fellowship ends

The Leonardo Affiliate Program

New Head of US NEA Jane Chu Advocates STEM to STEAM

Colleagues

our STEM to STEAM discussion on YASMIN

http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/

has been hot and heavy but has been dominated so far by practioners

in north american where the STEM to STEAM discourse has gone viral

of note is that Jane Chu has been appointed chair of the US National
Endowment for the Arts

http://arts.gov/news/2014/jane-chu-confirmed-chairman-national-endowment-arts

She has been widely quoted as advocating stem to steam such as in this visit
to rhode island

http://www.reed.senate.gov/news/releases/reed-nea-chairman-jane-chu-and-leading-arts-advocates-tour-art-works-ri

in her opening remarks

http://arts.gov/about/chairman/swearing-in-remarks

she states
Arts education is critical to raising America’s next generations of
Creative, Innovative thinkers. The other area we will further delve
into lies at the intersection of art, science, and technology. We
believe that synthesizing these differing perspectives can foster
those Creative and Innovative thinkers to help us solve problems,
think out of the box, and provide new insights. We want to turn the
focus from STEM education to STEAM education, and integrate Science,
Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math into our nation’s classrooms.
– See more at: http://arts.gov/about/chairman/swearing-in-remarks#sthash.IHqHR03M.dpuf

a very similar discourse is occurring  in europe -for instance the Ars
Electronica concept this year was

The Concept

http://www.aec.at/c/en/future-innovators-summit/

“Creativity is the art of finding the right questions, Innovation is
the ability to respond to them”

This year, the AE Festival’s mission is to confront the question of
“what it takes to change” and to call for answers from all directions
from different disciplines as well as different places all over the
world. But it’s not the usual question about what the future will look
like but rather how we get there and, most important, who are the
people who can scout these new ways. For this reason, Ars Electronica
has teamed up with Hakuhodo and ITU (International Telecommunication
Union) to organize the Future Innovators Summit.

At this summit, experienced professionals as well as young
entrepreneurs and social activists, technicians and scientists and, of
course, artists and designers will meet each other at the Ars
Electronica Festival for mutual inspiration and for the exchange of
ideas and know-how. The lineup will also include opportunities for
participants to engage in dialog among each other and with the public
audience. Besides a broad range of lectures, presentations and
exhibitions, we want to build a “special taskforce”—24 catalysts of
change, innovators and creators of tomorrow from places all over the
world who will present their ideas and projects and spend four days
together to come up with answers to the question of what it takes to
change.

Why is this a unique opportunity? At the moment, one can find a
growing lineup of events and gatherings for young entrepreneurs and
start-ups, as well as a lot of hackathons, game jams etc. where the
young community of programmers and developers can interact. The same
goes for festivals of young artists and conferences of young social
activists. What they all have in common is an exciting and virulently
inspiring atmosphere, but they often also share a certain flavor of
elitist exclusivity, and it’s usually pretty difficult to access them
as an outsider. Even more surprising is that you can hardly find
anevent at which these inspiring talents, creators and innovators can
convene, and do so across the borders of their communities and
disciplines. But this crossover is exactly what we’re looking for!

Read more about the “Future Innovators Summit” in an interview with
Hideaki Ogawa, member of the Ars Electronica Futurelab, on the Ars
Electronica Blog.

http://www.aec.at/c/en/future-innovators-summit/

It would be great to have comments in this discussions from yasminers
in europe and the mediterranean !