Why is Good Design so Desirable but yet so Difficult

Friends and Colleagues,

Creative Disturbance is developing rapidly and we hope you will spread the

word so we can meet our crowdfunding goal and create the fund to crowdsource

content through student grants around the globe.:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1008226087/creative-disturbance 
Meanwhile a new Channel ( Disturbance in our vocabulary) has opened under

the leadership of Prof Cassini Nazir  http://creativedisturbance.org/people/cassini-nazir/

Who is in discussion with Jereky Johnson:  http://creativedisturbance.org/people/jeremy-johnson-2/

http://creativedisturbance.org/podcast/putting-the-user-back-in-user-experience/

The Big Design Channel is in partnership with the Big Design Conferences and Cassini Nazir will be producing a series of podcasts with that creative community.

If you want to propose a podcast or recommend someone please do suggest via

http://creativedisturbance.org/ask-a-question/

Roger Malina

Do Universities contribute to creativity or innovation ? hmm.

Do Universities contribute to creativity or innovation ? hmm..Listen to the new student voices on Creative Disturbance !

http://creativedisturbance.org/channel/the-bold-roast/

Hosted by Stephanie Brisendine on Creative Disturbance

http://creativedisturbance.org/channel/the-bold-roast/
Students are predecessors, rebel fledglings, and promising pupils. They will continue to advance important research, all while breaking the mold and discovering new problems. The Bold Roast highlights these efforts, connects students across the globe that are undertaking bold and interesting research and work. This includes but is not limited to undergraduate capstone or senior projects, Masters theses, and PhD dissertation research.

http://creativedisturbance.org/channel/the-bold-roast/

and contribute to our crowdfunding to create a fund for grants
to students internationally to crowdfund podcasts for creative disturbance

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1008226087/creative-disturbance

Announcing the New Leonardos Channel on Creative Disturbance

Announcing the NEW LEONARDOs Channel on the UT Dallas “Creative Disturbance” Collaboration Platform

We are pleased to announce the launch of  the new Creative Disturbance collaboration platform.

http://creativedisturbance.org/

The project is part of the Experimental Publishing projects at the Leonardo Initiatives
at UD Dallas. We are experimenting both with podcasts as a form of professional
and scholarly publishing, but also knowledge curation in a structured crowdsourcing
context.

We have set up a New Leonardos Channel in partnership with MIT Press

http://creativedisturbance.org/channel/new-leonardos/

This channel is dedicated to making visible the work of the new breed of hybrid professionals
whose work contributes both in the arts and humanities but also in scientists in engineering,\
as the work of small mutltidisciplinary teams.
On this channel we will be posting podcasts with Leonardo authors
 and members of the Leonardo Editorial Boards.

Other channels include : Art and Earth Science, Meta-Life: Art and Biology,
oral histories by pioneers in art and technology in the Pioneers and Pathbreakers
Channel, Sonification of Scientific Data, Immersive Cinema Channel and more to come.

We also have a ‘Voices from the Crowd” channel

http://creativedisturbance.org/channel/voices-from-the-crowd/

Which is crowd sourced via a one degree of separation recommendation
from people who have already appeared in a podcast.

We also hope that you will spread the word about Creative
Disturbance and help us on our crowdfunding campaign.
The funds raised from the crowdfunding will be used to make awards
of up to $1000 to students internationally who will help bring in
podcasts from ttheir home city. We hope to make the peripheries more visible !!
PLEASE HELP US MAKE THIS HAPPEN WITH YOUR SUPPORT VIA
THE FIRST LEONARDO CROWDFUNDING CAMPAIGN

A Voice from the Crowd: Dark Matter in Art and Astronomy on Creative Disturbance

A Voice from the Crowd: Dark Matter in Art and Astronomy

We are pleased to announce the launch of the “Voices from the Crowd”  Channel, the

Crowdsourced channel on the Creative Disturbance collaboration platform

http://creativedisturbance.org/channel/voices-from-the-crowd/

 

The first voice from the crowd  is artist Morehshin Allahyari ( http://www.morehshin.com/ )
Allayhari discusses her work making visible censored and forbidden objects in Iran

and other countries. Malina discusses with her the problem of dark matter in astronomy

and personal connections.

 

Check out this podcast at:

 

http://creativedisturbance.org/podcast/dark-matter-in-astronomy-and-in-art/

 

If you would like to post a podcast on the Voices from the Crowd Channel-

you can

1) contact one of the Voices on Creative Disturbance

http://creativedisturbance.org/voices/

And have them recommend you for a Voices from the Crowd podcast.
We will then load up one of your podcasts of your choice.

2) Make a donation to our Crowdfunding campaign

 

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1008226087/creative-disturbance
Roger Malina

 

 

 

Creative Disturbance uses crowdsourcing to feature new, emerging or unusual ideas from interesting people internationally. This channel will initially run podcasts, in any language, from our friends and colleagues who made donations to the Creative Disturbance crowdfunding campaign.

In addition Creative Disturbance channel producers may invite any friend or colleague to post a podcast to the Voices of the Crowd. We will accept any podcast submitted with the recommendation of a producer

We will only exclude podcasts which violate legal restrictions concerning hate speech or libel or
are unrelated to the goals of Creative Disturbance. Podcasts must be under 15 minutes in length.

To make this channel happen please donate to our Kickstarter campaign.

Announcing the Art and Earth Science Channel on Creative Disturbance

Colleagues

 

We are pleased to announce the Art and Earth Sciences  Channel on Creative Disturbance

http://creativedisturbance.org/channel/art-and-earth-science/
This is one of several STEM to STEAM channels that will be announced.

Art and Earth Science

Hosted by Susan Eriksson

Artists have used the Earth as inspiration and as subject matter for millennia. This channel will highlight existing projects and discuss where the geosciences and artists can collaborate to bring new insights to what happens at the boundary between the disciplines. We are particularly interested in building research agendas to support this growing field.

If you are interested in being featured in a podcast discussing your work in Art and Earth Sciences contact me at

rmalina (at)alum.mit.edu

and I will put you in touch with Susan Eriksson

 

The first podcast is an Introduction to Art and Earth Science , a discussion between Susan Eriksson and Kathy Ellins

http://creativedisturbance.org/podcast/introduction-to-art-and-earth-science/ 

Dr. Kathy Ellins and Dr. Susan Eriksson discuss the current status of art and earth science collaborations and new directions that could bolster their utility in geoscience research and education. Dr. Kathy Ellins works in the office of Outreach and Diversity in the Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin and Dr. Susan Eriksson is an independent consultant and a research fellow in the ArtSci Lab at The University of Texas at Dallas

If you are interested in helping this project happen- we are Crowdfunding it until Dec 5

 

check out

 

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1008226087/creative-disturbance 

 

 

 

 

Kickstart the launch of Leonardo Virtual Africa Project

We are pleased to announce we are re-launching the Leonardo/OLATS
Virtual Africa Project under the leadership of Yvan Tina

The first new initiative is the Virtual Africa Channel on Creative Disturbance

http://creativedisturbance.org/disturbances/

The first  podcast ( in french) is with Claudine Dussolier, Abdo
Nawar, Ricardo Mbarkho who discuss their next book by RAMI ((Rencontres Arts et Multimédia
Internationales_which has been developing exchanges between north africa and the
mediterranean region

Yvan Tina will be setting up a series of podcasts with artists and
developers in Africa and the african diasporas in the art/science/technology community of practice
= if you are in Africa and would like to record a podcast contact me
at rmalina(at)alum.mit.edu and I will connect you with Yvan Tina

The earlier phase of Leonardo/OLATS Virtual Africa is still available at:

http://olats.org/africa/africa.php

The Virtual Africa Channel is part of the new Creative Disturbance collaboration
platform for the art/sci/tech field

http://creativedisturbance.org/

We are currently crowdfunding to raise funds to pay student awards to
crowdsource content for creative disturbance- including students in africa-
Through Creative Disturbance Virtual Africa Project we seek to network

and make unlikely connections between artists, scientists

and engineers in the african continent and disaporas
If you are interested in helping -make a donation of an size to our crowdfunding campaign

If you are intereted in being involved in the Virtual Africa contact me and I will

put you in touch with Yvan Tina: http://creativedisturbance.org/people/yvan-tina/ 

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1008226087/creative-disturbance

roger malina

Are you Creatively Disturbed ? Join us

Friends and Colleagues

I am really pleased to bring to your attention a new adventure to
cross connect the arts,sciences and technologies that I have been

working on withy my students in dallas and colleagues internationally

www.CreativeDisturbance.org

We have just launched a kickstarter campaign to raise funds to
award grants to students internationally to help us crowdsource
the content and keep the project running

please donate as much as you can and encourage your friends !

Join the Online Community of the Creatively Disturbed

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1008226087/creative-disturbance

Join the Online Community of the Creatively Disturbed.  A pioneering social networking platform called Creative
Disturbance is underway and crowdfunding. Creative Disturbance creates opportunities for people across the
world to make unlikely connections between the arts, sciences, and new technologies. Moreover, a key method
for sharing those connections and ideas is through Creative Disturbance’s curated catalog of podcasts. From
now till December 5th, you can become one of the founding members of this virtual coffee shop for the
intellectually curious.Their Kickstarter campaign seeks a minimum of $20,000 to help fund international
students’ work with developing the platform in their universities and general areas. To make a pledge toward
this exciting new program, visit the Creative Disturbance site, www.CreativeDisturbance.org, and follow the
Kickstarter link. (Creative Disturbance is a project of the ArtsSciLab of the Arts & Technology Program
at the University of Texas at Dallas.)

 www.CreativeDisturbance.org

Art and Technology Crowdfunding Month at University of Texas at Dallas

COUNTDOWN TO START OF

University’s Innovative ATEC Crowdfunding Month Beginning Nov 6

 

On November 6th, The Arts & Technology Program at the University of  Texas in Dallas (UTD) (www.utdallas.edu/atec) will launch ATEC Crowdfunding Month, an innovative undertaking to bring awareness to on-campus crowdfunding campaigns being run by and/or assisted by  its  ATEC faculty and students.

 

Directed by ATEC Associate Director Roger Malina, the program is spearheaded by David Marlett, a PhD student and Research Fellow in the ArtSciLab of ATEC, and the Executive Director of the National Crowdfunding Association (www.NLCFA.org).  “There are many terrific crowdfunding programs popping up at universities across the globe,” said Marlett.  “That goes for UTD as well, which is looking to launch an on-campus crowdfunding platform in 2015. One thing that makes ATEC Crowdfunding Month unique is that it is platform agnostic, in that the campaigns can be on whatever platform the faculty/students wish.” (The campaigns planned for this year’s ATEC Crowdfunding Month are on Kickstarter and Indiegogo.)

 

 

This year’s ATEC Crowdfunding Month, according to Marlett, is one of the first such programs at an American university: one where a set month is declared to promote the campaigns running on campus at that time. “This makes it easier for the university as a whole to get behind and promote, and helps coordinate some of the otherwise duplicated efforts among the campaigns,” added Marlett.

 

Dr. Roger Malina, Arts and Technology Distinguished Chair, and Associate Director of ATEC, runs the ATEC-ArtSciLab in which the idea for a ATEC Crowdfunding Month was born. “We are enthused to get this going and see how it will work”, said Malina. “Besides being beneficial for the projects themselves, it gives us a great opportunity to help our students learn crowdfunding and crowdsourcing methodologies. That experience could be invaluable in their future endeavors.”

 

The ATEC Crowdfunding Month campaigns will be accessible from the ATEC webpage, available at www.utdallas.edu/atec.  This year’s four projects are:

 

 

  • CREATIVE DISTURBANCE  —  ATEC students and faculty seek $20,000 for an international network and podcast platform supporting collaboration among the arts, sciences and new technologies communities. Crowdfunding will begin Nov 6.
  • See the project at:    www.creativedisturbance.org

 

  • GOPROS FOR THE BLUE HIGHWAY  —  An ATEC student seeks $12,000 for the 3D camera equipment to film a feature length film for the Oculus Rift. Crowdfunding will begin Nov 6.

 

  • UP IN THE AIR, DOWN ON THE GROUND – An ATEC student seeks $6,000 for a short, light-hearted animated film. Crwodfunding will begin Nov 6.

Crowdfunding is not new to UTD-ATEC students. Among prior campaigns, a 2013 one stands out. In that case, four UTD-ATEC animation students successfully crowdfunded their web-based, animated series, The Cyanide and Happiness Show, raising $770,000, which was in excess of 300% of their $250,000 target.

 

Crowdfunding has become a central and essential tool for raising both funds and customer/audience awareness for innovative art and technological ideas and products. It is estimated that over $5B was raised worldwide in 2013 through crowdfunding, with the estimate for 2014 put north of $8B.  “With the support of the ‘crowd’, these projects will all be successful,” concluded Marlett, “and we will have further developed our model for crowdfunding on university campuses.”

 

———————

Contact:

 

David Marlett

david_marlett@utdallas.edu

214-676-6140

For Immediate Release:

 

Dallas, Texas

October 31, 2014

 

University’s Innovative ATEC Crowdfunding Month Launching

 

On November 6th, The Arts & Technology Program at the University of  Texas in Dallas (UTD) (www.utdallas.edu/atec) will launch ATEC Crowdfunding Month, an innovative undertaking to bring awareness to on-campus crowdfunding campaigns being run by and/or assisted by  its faculty and students.

 

With the support of UTD-ATEC faculty, the program is spearheaded by David Marlett, a PhD student and Research Fellow in the ArtSciLab of ATEC, and the Executive Director of the National Crowdfunding Association (www.NLCFA.org).  “There are many terrific crowdfunding programs popping up at universities across the globe,” said Marlett.  “That goes for UTD as well, which is looking to launch an on-campus crowdfunding platform in 2015. One thing that makes ATEC Crowdfunding Month unique is that it is platform agnostic, in that the campaigns can be on whatever platform the faculty/students wish.” (The campaigns planned for this year’s ATEC Crowdfunding Month are on Kickstarter and Indiegogo.)

 

Crowdfunding is not new to UTD-ATEC students. Among prior campaigns, a 2013 one stands out. In that case, four UTD-ATEC animation students successfully crowdfunded their web-based, animated series, The Cyanide and Happiness Show, raising $770,000, which was in excess of 300% of their $250,000 target.

 

This year’s ATEC Crowdfunding Month, according to Marlett, is one of the first such programs at an American university: one where a set month is declared to promote the campaigns running on campus at that time. “This makes it easier for the university as a whole to get behind and promote, and helps coordinate some of the otherwise duplicated efforts among the campaigns,” added Marlett.

 

Dr. Roger Malina, Arts and Technology Distinguished Chair, and Associate Director of ATEC, runs the ATEC-ArtSciLab in which the idea for a ATEC Crowdfunding Month was born. “We are enthused to get this going and see how it will work”, said Malina. “Besides being beneficial for the projects themselves, it gives us a great opportunity to help our students learn crowdfunding and crowdsourcing methodologies. That experience could be invaluable in their future endeavors.”

 

The ATEC Crowdfunding Month campaigns will be accessible from the ATEC webpage, available at www.utdallas.edu/atec.  This year’s four projects are:

 

  • INNERSPACE  —  ATEC students seek $25,000 to complete their highly stylized and original independent video game.

 

  • CREATIVE DISTURBANCE  —  ATEC students and faculty seek $20,000 for an international network and podcast platform supporting collaboration among the arts, sciences and new technologies communities.

 

  • GOPROS FOR THE BLUE HIGHWAY  —  An ATEC student seeks $12,000 for the 3D camera equipment to film a feature length film for the Oculus Rift.

 

  • UP IN THE AIR, DOWN ON THE GROUND – An ATEC student seeks $6,000 for a short, light-hearted animated film.

 

Crowdfunding has become a central and essential tool for raising both funds and customer/audience awareness for innovative art and technological ideas and products. It is estimated that over $5B was raised worldwide in 2013 through crowdfunding, with the estimate for 2014 put north of $8B.  “With the support of the ‘crowd’, these projects will all be successful,” concluded Marlett, “and we will have further developed our model for crowdfunding on university campuses.”

 

———————

Contact:

 

David Marlett

david_marlett@utdallas.edu

214-676-6140

 

Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History – UTD Leonardo Initiatives “Generation 1: Chronicles of the Art-and-Technology Vanguard”

The Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History  – UTD Leonardo Initiatives “Generation 1: Chronicles of the Art-and-Technology Vanguard”

 

The University of Texas at Dallas’ new Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History    (EODIAH) and the Leonardo Initiatives of ATEC at UTD are pleased to announce

the Leonardo Generation 1 Project, an open and expanding archive of the foundational forces in art-and-technology media hybrids.

 http://www.dallasnews.com/business/columnists/robert-miller/20141028-ut-dallas-to-inaugurate-edith-odonnell-institute-of-art-history.ece 

 

The Leonardo Generation 1 Project chronicles the multi-perspectival merger between technology and art from the 1950s through the 1980s.  Generation 1 amplifies the voices of pioneering and influential artists, engineers, curators, and key organizations through a growing databank of written first-person accounts and podcast recordings. The project seeks to document the experiences of those most closely involved in the creation of digital art, new media art, and computer art using the tools of the digital humanities. Leonardo Generation 1 shares the unique perspectives of the new media/computational vanguard in a style that is at once embracing and accessible, intellectually rigorous yet casual. This new project is aimed at uncovering a rich, if somewhat underappreciated, time in art history by recording the memories of the pioneers who are still alive.

 

The Generation 1 Project is part of the Leonardo Pioneers and Pathbreakers project of the Observatoire Leonardo des Arts et Techno-Sciences in Paris, and in collaboration with its director, Annick Bureaud. Memoirs are being published both on the Pioneers and Pathbreakers website athttp://olats.org/pionniers/pionniers.php and in the Leonardo Journal art history section edited by Prof David Carrier: http://leonardo.info/leoinfo.html

 

Recorded discussions with pioneers will be featured on the Pioneers and Pathbreakers channel on the Creative Disturbance art science technology collaboration platform

 

http://creativedisturbance.org/channel/pioneers-and-pathbreakers/

 

The co-directors of the Generation 1 Project are Professor Roger Malina, an affiliate faculty member of the EODIAH and an ATEC Distinguished Chair at the University of Texas at Dallas, and Dr. Charissa Terranova, an Associate Professor of Art History in EODIAH. The project is coordinated by ATEC ArtSciLab Research Fellow, Poe Johnson, a University of Texas at Dallas PhD student. Their varied perspectives and skill sets embody the hybridity of the memoirs project itself, and the philosophy of University of Texas at Dallas ATEC and Arts & Humanities programs.

 

Among the recent memoirs are an inside account of the workings of Bell Labs from A Michael Noll, Helen and Newton Harrison about their early work in art and environment, Frieder Nake a pioneering German computer artist, Trudy Reagan about the early days of the YLEM organization.

 

Submissions for the Pioneers and Pathbreakers memoir project are decided and peer reviewed by The Frieda Ackerman Committee: Marc Battier, Paul Brown, Annick Bureaud, David Carrier, Joel Chadabe, Anne Collins, Eduardo Kac, Roger Malina, Patrick McCray, Frieder Nake, Louise Poissant, Eddie Shanken, and Charissa Terranova. The call for memoirs is available at http://leonardo.info/isast/journal/calls/pioneers.html.

Unknowables, are they Pseudo Science, or Pseudo Art ?

Colleagues

I just posted this about unknowables in science on our YASMIN discussion on

the Super Natural in art science

Follow the discussion at http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/

Join and post to the discussion at; http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions

Roger Malina

aprille, glenn, martha, lilian and several other yasminers

As a scientist ( physics then astrophysics) I am very comortable
of unknowables that are developed within science and mathematics

the most obvious of these is goedel’s theorem in math and i have lived
all my life with the understanding that certain things in the universe
are unknowable- eg beyond the event horizon in general relativity
eg you cant know even theoretically about the internal stucture
of a black hole (or before the big bang) because signals cant
get out- you can know the mass and charge, angular momentum
of a black hole but
not about much more ( the famous ‘no hair’ problem)
yeah i know that stephen hawkin has been nibbling away at this

in complexity theory ( not my field) we understand that we cannot
predict in detail the future state of a complex system derived from
the interaction rules between the components- because certain
properties are ‘emergent”

I found this interesting article by John Casti of the Santa Fe Institute
on The Outer Limits: In Search of the “Unknowable” in Science

http://www.santafe.edu/media/workingpapers/96-01-001.pdf

Casti talks about a number of unknowables such as Alan Turing’s
Halting Problem.,

interestingly he talks about the Heiseberg uncertainty principal
which i had thought argues that one cannot know to infinite precision
both the location and velocity of a quantum particle- Casti argues
this might be a mathematical limit to understanding not a physical limit

he discusses at some length whether some things are fundamentally
“uncomputable” – we recently argued at length with mathematician
and computer artist frieder nake who feels strongly that many
pheonena are theoretically uncomputable

he describes the problem as one of mapping either mathemical models or
computer models on to the natural world

i am very comfortable
with the idea that certain things about the world
are supernatural in the sense that they can not be modelled either
with mathematics or computer models= or are theoretically unobservable
such as the interior structure of a black hole

of course this use of the word super natural is not the common one
and could be misleading

like paul i dont think pseudo science enters into this discussion
but i must admit Lilian has got me thinking about pseudo art

my friend and physics colleague jean marc levy leblond indeed
would argue that most art science is pseudo art !!

roger malina

 

Announcing a Yasmin Discussion: beginning Oct 15 2014

The Plight of the Supernatural in an Art-Science World

To Contribute to and follow the YASMIN discussion, Join:

http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
To Follow the YASMIN discussion, without posting, subscribe:

http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/

 

We are pleased to announce a LeonardoYASMIN discussion on the topic of the “supernatural” as a concept, as it relates to science, to pseudo-science, and to the pairing of art with science. The discussion will commence the week of October 15. Some preliminary questions to ponder are:

 

  • What if any at all, specious or not, is the relationship between the supernatural which is understood to be a religious/magical concept, and post-Newtonian contemporary physics whose deep mysteries challenge our understanding of “natural” as a scientific concept?

 

  • The rise of Art-Science should not ignore the stunning fact that most of the planet’s population, including some scientists and likely many artists, continues to believe that a dualistic material nature and magical supernature co-exist, and that the latter out-rules the former in its stewardship of the Cosmos. Such belief is manifest in contemporary versions of ancient myths.

 

  • To science, the supernatural is a non-concept — it does not exist, since it is not amenable to the scientific method. It is indistinguishable from fantasy and the imaginary. Its exclusion is a central premise of science, which would never abandon an investigation of the confusing physics of dark matter, for example, by declaring those mysteries to lie on the other side of a natural/supernatural divide.  Can the supernatural, to the extent that it represents mystery and the unknown, be naturalized? Could religion continue its mission without the concept of a supernatural universe?

 

  • To what definition of “science” does art connect in the art-science enterprise, if it does not also, like science, dismiss the supernatural as a fiction?

 

  • Is there an art-pseudoscience movement concealed within the art-science movement?

 

  • The sustainability of the traditional definition of the supernatural is in trouble. Art, which has the capacity to endow that which is material with poetic, transcendent, and emotional qualities, has paired up with science. Could it eventually make religion as we know it obsolete? Can art provide for a sensation of “the spiritual” in a non-supernatural paradigm? Scientist Stuart Kauffman has argued that the sciences of complexity allows us to ‘re-invent the sacred”.

 

  • Concepts once considered paranormal or supernatural and “outside of science” such as remote viewing, are now enabled by distance viewing technologies available on every cell phone.

 

  • What intellectual domain “owns” a legitimate discussion of the existence or non-existence of the supernatural? Most would say religion and theology – but neither of those can provide any actual information about the supernatural, a concept that is central to their beliefs – not what it is, where it is, or how it works. Religion and theology do not own the supernatural discourse any more than they did the question of which orbits the other, the Earth or the Sun.

 

  • In terms of its art historical roots, how does art-science relate to the gradual decline of belief in the supernatural over the last two centuries, beginning with 19th century art’s deconstruction of illusionistic space in painting and its relocation of avant-garde aesthetics to real space (the same space that science studies)?

 

The Discussion Moderator is Stephen Nowlin, Vice President, Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, where he is director of the Alyce de Roulet Williamson Gallery. His curatorial practice emphasizes the intersection of art and science.

http://williamsongallery.net/google .

 

Discussants will include:

 

Nancy Lowe, artist, catalyst for art-science collaborations

Director of Symbiosis Art+Science Alliance (symbASA)

http://symbasa.org .

 

Margaret Wertheim

Author, “Physics on the Fringe,” co-curator, “Crochet Coral Reef”

Director, The Institute For Figuring, Los Angeles

http://theiff.org

 

Andres Collazo, PhD

Biologist

Director, Beckman Institute Biological Imaging Center

California Institute of Technology

http://bioimaging.caltech.edu

Daniel  Lewis, PhD

Author, Curator

Chief Curator of Manuscripts (History of Science, Medicine, and Technology)

Huntington Library, Art Collection, and Botanical Gardens

http://huntington.org

 

 

Joseph Klein, DMus

Distinguished Teaching Professor

Chair, Division of Composition Studies

University of North Texas College of Music

http://music.unt.edu/comp/josephklein/

 

Martha Blassnigg, PhD

Reader in the Anthropology of Media | Transtechnology Research |  Editor, Transtechnology Research Open Access Papers | Associate Editor, Leonardo Reviews and L|R|Q * Plymouth University

http://www5.plymouth.ac.uk/staff/martha-blassnigg

 

To Contribute to the YASMIN discussion, Join:

http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
To Follow the YASMIN discussion subscribe:

 

http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/