Are Barabasi’s Laws&Formulas for Success Applicable to Transdisciplinary ArtScience Practice ?

 

Colleagues

It is with pleasure that I recommend the new book

Albert-László Barabási : The Formula: The Universal Laws of Success. Little Brown – 2018 ISBN-13: 9780316505499

Reviewed by: Roger F. Malina, February 9 2019

ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3399-3865

Reviews and critiques by; Sharath Chandra Ram, Isabel Meirelles, Wolf Rainer

Albert-Laszlo Barabasi, in this new book, provides unusual and compelling evidence on the patterns that underlie common sense of ‘success’. He chooses to call these insights  “laws”, with formulas ; I will question those descriptors later in the review. But as an astronomer, and observational scientist, I resonate deeply with the way he collects his data, analyses patterns and then develops tools to frame an understanding of how those patterns emerge.  Yes, if you want to both excel and succeed, read this book.

One caveat, from my background in astronomy, is that as a profession we invested a huge amount of time over the centuries looking at patterns of stars, moving stars, and later morphology of galaxies. Some of these patterns turned out to be irrelevant to understanding the underlying structures; constellations for instance, or the study of the moon and planets to explicate human behaviors. And during my own professional career we learned, thanks to Vera Rubin and many others, that dark matter, which does not emit light, was dominant in explaining the structure and evolution of galaxies. The patterns and morphologies that astronomers were obsessed with were relevant but not fundamental. Similarly my colleagues including Saul Perlmutter, found compelling evidence that the universe is expanding at an accelerated rate due to an unknown ‘dark energy’. Not a common sense result, at least at the time I was getting my education

This background made me a skeptical reader of Barabasi’s claim to have found the ‘formulas’ and “laws’ for individual  human and group success. The self help industry is littered with unsubstantiated claims; be careful when searching on line for the laws of success !.But for me Barabasi reframes our thinking about all these questions, brings to bear his expertise in complex network science and data science to create guidelines on how to convert performance into success; both terms he defines clearly, in fields as separate as jazz performers and nobel prize winning biologists. And the book is peppered with fascinating vignettes, such as the mistaken identity incident that transformed Einstein from an excellent scientist to a successful world renowned one. But other exemplars of these laws include  why an average basketball player can transform a team into a superteam, and how a smart coach can spot what the average player can bring to group success.

Let me list Barabasi five laws:

  1. Performance drives success, but when performance can’t be measured, networks drive success.
  2. Performance is bounded but success is unbounded.
  3. Previous success x fitness = future success.
  4. While team success requires diversity and balance, a single individual will receive credit for the groups achievements.
  5. With persistence success can come at any time.

First reaction as I read was “hmm nothing new here, Sounds like common sense”.  But as I read, the more and more I became convinced that this book was reframing the way I think about the ArtSciLab ( https://artscilab.atec.io/  )  at UTDallas. Cassini Nazir and I co-direct this lab as part of a network of labs in ATEC School at UTDallas . In this lab we have emerging professionals from the “arts” and “sciences” working together, in a designed heterogeneous collaboration lab ; and the performance and success criteria for each of the different professions could not be more different – from the unquantifiable performance criteria in some of the arts, to the citation driven metrics of performance in many of the sciences. Our difficulties in translating performance into success in these transdisciplinary practices has led me to joke that astronomy had been so easy.  With its well defined performance and success criteria that a whole community of practice shares, there is a perhaps a ‘formula’ for success in astronomy.

Alex Topete in the ArtSciLab is now leading our HERMES project to collect data on the structures and methods of inter and transdisciplinary research labs, and translate this into ‘apprenticeship’ training. We hope the HERMES approach will help us develop similar ‘common sense’ on how to help our colleagues both perform well and also succeed in their chosen hybrid professions that are often excluded from the silo structures of our institutions. Barabasi’s previous books were already part of our apprenticeship reading, but this book is fundamental and will reshape our approaches.

Let me finish with a few reflexions, not criticisms, of this excellent book.

First, I find the use of the words ‘formula’ and ‘law’ problematic, perhaps because of the way these words are used popularly. Barabasi’s use is very specific, they are the formalisms that can be used to predictably describe the patterns in the data that he and others have found. So far so good. But if there is any take home message that I have taken from the sciences of complexity, it is that we need many ideas of causality and be careful about our implicit biases. Not only the A causes B  implication of Barabasi’s third law. Whether in understanding the emerging structures in the Universe or the health of ecologies, or human well-being,  we know that emerging behaviors often  arise from low level rules of interaction, as well as the implication of network morphologies, not necessarily from ‘laws’ of the systemic behaviour  And in many systems (eg climate change) you can model the systems extrapolate future behaviour and develop equations that describe well the data collected in the past, but future behaviour maybe be disrupted by causalities that are of the kind A causes B, if C didn’t happen and D happened 100 years ago. Never mind the impact of sporadic events such as unusual solar cycles, asteroid impact or out of the ordinary volcanic eruptions. Kathryn Hayles has usefully complexified the differences between prediction and retrodiction; Barabasi, I think, with the use of the words ‘law’ and ‘formula’ may mislead some readers. The laws of success as explicated by Barabasi are in a different epistemological framework than the Newtonian laws of gravity. This in my view complexifies how one can translate these laws into daily practice.

The other reflection concerns the sociology of human behavior in institutions. A book that influenced my thinking and practice is Randall Collins book “ The Sociology of Philosophies: A Global Theory of Intellectual Change”. One of the take home messages of the book is that the history of successful ideas is often dominated by ‘office politics’ rather than the excellence of the ideas or individuals. Collins studies schools of philosophy over the millennia in China, Asia, Japan, the West and finds, like Barabasi, patterns that seem to replicate, though in a less data driven quantifiable way than does Barabasi. For instance the common situation of personal disagreement between a PhD advisor and an excellent PhD students leads the student to leave rather than continue to collaborate; the student leads a new school of philosophy that is more successful than that of his mentor. Another example would be the current discussions of how the careers of many young professionals have been strongly influenced by sexual and or psychological harassment in institutions that are historically reticent to punish excellent acadmeic performers for poor or criminal personal behaviors on campus. Barabasi does discuss many examples of what I am calling ‘office politics’, but maybe there is a possible 6th law.

Certainly as part of the community of practice, including our ArtSciLab, that is trying to create research that bridges the arts and sciences, sometimes called STEM to STEAM, we face these issues. We are well aware how office politics has negatively influenced the success of some of our most brilliant colleagues. Sometimes the social structure of institutions is “incompatible” with the success of certain excellent ideas because the way incentives, such as promotion and tenure, function to reinforce ‘silo-ed’ thinking. As a result, our community of practice is still marked by intellectual and geographic migrants, “geniuses’ who have often been abandoned and forgotten. The innovation and creativity research community, including the science of team science area that Barabasi develops, is fast moving as we seek to translate  and combine “sciences” with “arts” into useful medical practices and other social outcomes.

Another thought. The 68-year-old that I am was of course encouraged by Barabasi’s 5th Law: Success can come at any time. He analyses in depths the age at which celebrated figures did their outstanding work; yes, most do this before their 30s. But he complexifies this with examples and data of how on the tail of this distribution there are many examples of successful and exceptional achievements in later years. He illustrates this work with the way John Fenn carried out his ground-breaking work in his sixties and received the Nobel prize in his later 80s. He develops the idea of the “‘Q’factor”, the ability to translate ideas into discoveries and quantifies a number of common sense ideas. But more importantly he develops the idea of how to develop ones ‘Q’ factor, through collaboration methodologies, a fundamental concept in the UT Dallas ArtSciLab. And his discussion ties in nicely with Edward Said’s ideals in his book “On Late Style” and the SOTA (Students Older than Average) being led by Linda Anderson in our ArtSciLab. Michael Punt introduced me to this line of argument as part of the COGNOVO program, on cognitive innovation, at the University of Plymouth. The idea that the brain and body have multiple ‘modes of operations , and that these ‘modes’ can be altered, or their use modified by experience or by age or other factors. The popular press on toggling between “quick thinking’ and “slow thinking’, or “thing small” and “think big” ties into this in some way. Said’s ideas helb reshape the way we think about involving older professionals in innovation work.

Said’s full book is at: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/159782/on-late-style-by-edward-w-said/9780375726330/ and I note in passing that it feeds into my colleague Nina Czegledy’s insistence that in transdisciplinar work we need to invent new mechanisms of inter-generational communication and collaboration. This hallmark of the community of Practice that uses the Leonardo SAST and OLATS organisations for part of their professional needs, as Nina discovered as she led our 50th anniversary ‘village’ birthday parties.

In conclusion we will be adding Barabasi’s new book to our transdisciplinary apprenticeship source material.

Disclaimer. I have met Barabasi a few times during my career. As he explains before becoming a successful scientist, he tried to be a sculptor. This hybrid interest has led him to talk at a Leonardo art-science event in Prague. Later I reached out to Barabasi when I was recruited at UT Dallas to ask if he had recommendations for emerging professionals that I might help recruit. This led to the UTD hiring of historian Max Schich. Max Schich and Isabel Meirelles went on to lead the influential Arts, Humanities and Complex Network symposia at the network science conferences. When Max Schich, an art historian, arrived in Dallas, he published an article in Science which now has an Altmetrics score of nearly 500, and his YouTube video has 1.5 million downloads, yes 1.5 million; certainly a measure of success for an art historian! For me, this anecdote exemplifies Barabasi’s practice over the decades, and illustrates well the laws and formulas Barabasi now proposes in his book under review here: The Formula: The Universal Laws of Success, Little Brown –

2018. I apologise for referring frequently to how I found the ideas of Barabasi’s book applicable to our ArtSciLab and would be interested in if other transdisciplinary researchers find the ideas applicable in their case.


 

After the Internet : Leonardo call for ideas on what will replace the internet

Leonardo Colleagues

OK how can Leonardo launch a publication for space tourists ? check out

http://www.olats.org/space/sasc21/2019/sasc21_2019.php

As you will remember Leonardo was an early adopter of on-line publishing, Our fineart forum started in 1988 with ray lauzana’s brilliant initiative and the Leonardo web site was one of the first 400 web sites on the web in 1994.

Here follows , below, a brief history of some of Leonardo’s initiatives in digital culture enabled by the internet and pre internet thanks to a number of adventurous pioneers including Ray Lauzzana, Craig Harris, Judy Malloy, Paul Brown and Nisar Keshvani , the late Carl Loeffler and Roy Ascott ( if i forgot someone -eyell !) (history is cruel)

But what comes next in 50 years the internet will no longer exist what comes next ? we welcome ideas for how Leonardo could be an early adopter in the systems that will replace the internet

Joe Davis is working on art archiving using CRISPR technologies with George Church at Harvard….???? Should Leonardo start CRISPR publishing ?

The late Jean Marc Philippe unfortunately never got to launch KEO, a publishing project intended to return to earth in 50.000 years- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KEO– otherwise we would have the first Leonardo publication in geostationary orbit !

Vint Cerf in the 1990s with JPL tried to set up an interplanetary internet as he discussed at the Leonardo Space Arts Workshops in Paris in 1999- http://www.olats.org/spaceavantRefonte/13avril-III/programme_participants-old.shtml  

Sorry  Vint it never happened 20 years later – you are indeed a visionary

So what new initiatives should Leonardo start to pioneer in the post-internet era ? Leonardo started on-line publishing in 1988- almost 30 years ago-now is the time to pioneer again

 

Leonardo/OLATS is relaunching its space arts workshops 

http://www.olats.org/space/sasc21/2019/sasc21_2019.php http://www.olats.org/space/sasc21/2019/sasc21_2019.php under the leadership of Annick Bureaud, Jean Luc Soret and Ewen Chardronnet- what will space tourists read ? Leonardo get ready !! We welcome proposals for the first publications for space tourists. Ellon Musk will finance ?

Roger Malina

https://www.leonardo.info/blog/2019/03/12/when-were-we-first-on-the-world-wide-web

When Were We First on the World Wide Web?

By Danielle Siembieda

Today (12 March 2019) celebrates the 30th anniversary of the World Wide Web. Needless to say to say this historical moment was critical for Computer Art as it opened the door to a whole new movement of Net Art. Leonardo reserve a few bragging rights for being one of the first websites online. But the mystery of exactly when we launched on the internet, and what the first URL was, is still open for debate.

First, let us give our thanks to Craig Harris, Judy Malloy, Paul Brown and Nisar Keshvani for their pioneering work getting Leo online! Here is a break down of our digital timeline.

1988

Leonardo’s first forays into digital publishing were two bulletin boards: FineArt Forum and F.A.S.T. These bulletin boards predate internet browsers and were accessed over various networks such as the Well, Compuserve and MCI. FineArt Forum, founded by Ray Lauzzana, had been distributed over academic networks since May 1987 through Bitnet, CSNET, ARPA, Internet and Janet, but was supported by Leonardo/ISAST beginning in 1998, when it was added to the WELL system under the Art Com Electronic Network (ACEN), operated by Carl Loeffler. At this time, ISAST begin publishing the subscription publication F.A.S.T, the Fine Art, Science and Technology Bulletin Board, also through the Well and MCI networks under ACEN, and was also available as a diskette!

The announcement below appears in the first issue of Leonardo in 1989 (Volume 22).

Leonardo on the Web 1989

1991

In 1991 Leonardo published a special Art and Interactive Telecommunications issue with guest editors Roy Ascott and Carl Loeffler. An article by Leonardo Executive Editor Roger Malina, “Fineart Forum and F.A.S.T.: Experiments in Electronic Publishing in the Arts,” presents an account of Leonardo/ISAST’s early digital presence.

1993

Leonardo Electronic Almanac issue 1

1993 launched the Leonardo Electronic Almanac under founder and editor-in-chief Craig Harris. Early LEA was distributed by electronic mail. An essay by Craig Harris, “Historical Perspective: Leonardo Electronic Almanac,” that recounts the beginnings of LEA was published in LEA in 2010.

1994

The Leonardo On-Line website was founded in 1994 and was, according to ISAST lore, one of the first 400 websites on the internet! The URL first appeared in Leonardo journal issue 1 of 1995: http:/www-mitpress.mit.edu/Leonardo/home.html [we think the missing slash is sic but the dash is correct]. Was this the first URL? What did the site look like? The ISAST office doesn’t have records!

1994 also brought the first hyperlinked issue of FineArt Forum. You can read an archived version of that issue HERE. In the editorial, fAf editor Paul Brown wrote: “This issue will be the first to appear with full hyperlinking…. Who needs to read when you can point and click?”

1995

Leonardo in the McKinley Yellow Pages 1995
McKinley Group Internet Yellow Pages 1995

Leonardo On-Line and the Leonardo Electronic Almanac were listed in this 1995 version of the McKinley Internet Yellow Pages paper directory. This was before Google Search! This listing also notes that LEA had moved to the World Wide Web at http://www-mitpress.mit.edu/LEA/home.html.

1999

The first screenshot we could find of the actual Leonardo On-Line landing page was in 1999, also hosted on MIT Press website.

Leonardo On-Line MIT Press 1999

2000

At the beginning of the 21st century, we moved our URL to ram.leonardo.org.

Ram.leonardo.org

 

ArtSciLab Grey Paper: Data Listening, Listening to Data, Data Sonification podcast channel update

colleagues

Scot Gresham-Lancaster of the UTD ATEC ArtSciLab is the producer of a podcast channel Data and Sound on Creative Disturbance ( https://creativedisturbance.org/ ). He has been interviewing key researchers in the emerging field called variously Data Listening, Listening to Data and Data Sonification. If you are interested in being interviewed for this channel please contact me at rmalina@alum.mit.edu

here is a ArtSciLab Grey Paper with a summary of the publications to date:

Roger Malina

 

UTD ATEC ArtSci Lab Grey Paper #3.0:

“Sound and Data” Podcast Channel of Pioneers and Practioners in the emerging field of data sonification.  https://creativedisturbance.org/channel/sound-data/ 

 

FEB. 15, 2019

Scot Gresham-Lancaster ORCID#0000-0002-8400-6041

Roger Malina, https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3399-3865

Sharath Chandra Ram

 

Abstract:

This artscilab grey paper summarises the scope and content of the Sound and Data Channel on Creative Disturbance produced by Scot Gresham Lancaster. The channel publishes podcasts with pioneers and current practitioners in the area of data sonification, also known as listening to data or data listening.

 

Table of Contents:

  1. Introduction
  2. Podcasts with Pioneers
  3. Podcasts with current Practioners
  4. Conclusion
  5. Acknowledgements

 

 

  • Introduction

 

Working with the Art Science Lab that is part of ATEC at the University of Texas at Dallas, Scot Gresham-Lancaster got a chance to do a series of podcasts via the podcast aggregate Creative Disturbance. Over the last four years Research Artist Gresham-Lancaster has been talking to some of the foremost experts doing research, theorizing and performing using the various techniques and concepts that the idea of LISTENING TO DATA can lead to. This has been an opportunity to have frank and open discussions with many of the pioneers and current experts in the field.

 

This has been a rare opportunity to speak in detail about the “lessons learned” and workflows that addressing the conversion of data into audio and present in a wide variety of unique auditory solutions that have been very informative and helped guide our work to new horizons.

 

Here is the header on the “Sound and Data” website:

Auditory perception has advantages in temporal, amplitude, and frequency resolution that open possibilities as an alternative or complement to visualization techniques. The implications and techniques of this approach to extending the perception of data to the sense of hearing will be the focus of this channel.

 

The following is a hypertext link to each of the podcasts in the series up until the Fall of 2018. We start with the discussions that were with the actual pioneers of the field and then move onto the many current researchers and practitioners in the field. The reader is encouraged to follows these links and listen to the podcasts that catch their interest. This podcast has enable a discussion this topic with the top practitioners in the world. Their biographies are associated with each hyperlink.

2. The Pioneers of the field:

Pauline Oliveros – Some Thoughts on Sonification

 

The Field of Sonification – Greg Kramer

 

Carla Scaletti-Early Pioneer of Sonification Research

 

What follows is a listing of the current practitioners that we have had the opportunity to have in-depth conversations. They are listed in alphabetical order.

 

3. Current Practitioners

 

Mark Ballora – Sonification Research

 

Talking Trees – Bert Barten

 

Andrew Blanton The Conductor

 

Chris Chafe Brain Stethoscope and other projects

 

Roger Dean [ENG]Intonation and Cognition

 

  1. Alexis Emelianoff [ENG] Listening to Electromagnetic Fields

 

Florian Grond and Listening Mode Centered Sonification

 

Martin Keary Making the YouTube critique of Sonification

 

Marco Buongiorno Nardelli Material Sound Music

 

Sophia Roosth – All the Senses

 

Margaret Schedel and the Sounds of Science

 

Dr. Paul Vickers – Sonification, Ethical Computing and Standup Comedy [ENG]

 

Mike Winters – Sonification of Emotion

 

David Worral [ENG] An overview of decades work in Sonification

 

4. Conclusion

The hope is that this introduction to this resource will lead to some readers listening to the hours of interviews associated with the Sound and Data channel. It has been a great thrill to get the perspectives of these dedicated artists and scientists as they are all working at the frontier of these new Audio Art practices. If you are an artist or researcher involved in data sonification work and would be interested in publishing a podcast- please contact the producer Scot Gresham Lancaster.

 

5. Acknowledgements

We thank all the members of the Data Stethoscope team for their participation on the development of these ideas: Gagan Wig,  Tim Perkis, Andrew Blanton, Adnan Syed, Judd Bradbury, Michela Chan, Neil Savalia, Cassini Nazir, Kristen Duepree and Make or Break gaming company

 

What would YOU tell the US National Endowment of Arts ! Now is the time to mobilise !

colleagues

As i mentionned in my previous blog the US community of practice in our art/science/technology fields are getting attention from the US National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine with the upcoming April 12 in Washington DC  : https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-national-convening-on-the-integration-the-arts-humanities-and-stemm-in-higher-ed-tickets-53159362083 

Now the US National Endowment of the Arts has launched an important process of consultation with the community- https://www.fbo.gov/?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=22e0f9e9e0e c9003a98e3434b0d4beff&tab=core&_cview=0 

please share this with your colleagues and encourage participation and interezt

  1. What is the range of examples of such work across artistic disciplines and technology platforms? Are there categories or classifications for identifying this work, by genre or sub-discipline or by type of technology used?
  2. What is the range of career paths or trajectories taken by artists working with technology? Across artistic disciplines, how are these pathways similar or different?
  3. How do artists working with technology participate in cross-sectoral and/or cross-disciplinary partnerships, and/or in their local creative economies? How are these relationships formed and to what purpose? What
  4. are the associated risks, challenges, and opportunities for artists?
  5. What are current and prospective sources of support for artistic practices using technology, and how might they be improved and/or sustained?
  6. What types of technical training and resources are used and needed to support artistic practices using technology? What gaps in training and resources currently exist for these artists, across
  7. how might they be improved and/or sustained?
  8. What types of technical training and resources are used and needed to support artistic practices using technology? What gaps in training and resources currently exist for these artists, across artistic disciplines and technology platforms?
  9. What are current and emergent models for supporting artistic practices (financially and non-financially) using technology? Across artistic disciplines, how are these models similar or different?
  10. What are organizational risks, challenges, and opportunities in supporting artists working with technology? How do these differ among for-profit and non-profit organizations? By sector, artistic discipline, and/or technology platform?The NEA will convene a Technical Working Group of stakeholders in the arts and technology fields, including, but not limited to, artists, arts presenters and curators, arts researchers, tech industry representatives and other funders working at this intersection. The Technical Working Group will provide feedback on the research plan, selected deliverables, and the dissemination of study findings, and will recommend participants in the roundtables, interviews, and case studies.

 

ROGER MALINA

DRAFT Statement of Work US National Endowment for the Arts

Arts & Technology Field Scan

 

SECTION C

DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATIONS/STATEMENT OF WORK

C.1 GENERAL BACKGROUND

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) was established by Congress in 1965 as an independent agency of the federal government. To date, the NEA has awarded more than $5 billion to support artistic excellence, creativity, and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities. The agency extends its work through partnerships with state arts agencies, regional arts organizations, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector.

America has increasingly become a digital society. A significant proportion of people’s lives are now spent online. As of 2016, 88% of Americans use the Internet, and roughly three-quarters of American adults have broadband internet service at home.[1] The vast majority of Americans – 95% – now own a cellphone of some kind, and the share of Americans that own smartphones is now 77%.[2] About 70% of Americans use social media, including Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, and LinkedIn, to connect with one another, engage with news content, share information, and entertain themselves.[3]

Artists and other content creators, too, are increasingly using digital and emerging media as a medium for artistic expression. For the grant-making purposes of the NEA, Media Arts is defined by all genres and forms that use electronic media, film and technology (analog & digital; old and new) as an artistic medium or a medium to broaden arts appreciation and awareness of any discipline. This grant support extends to projects presented via film, television, radio, audio, video, the Internet, interactive and mobile technologies, video games, immersive and multi-platform storytelling, and satellite streaming. Yet it is difficult to define a field that is in a constant state of refinement and innovation, with constantly emerging forms, including data storytelling, docu-gaming, interactive films, gestural interfaces, and generative art.[4] It is also unclear whether creators in media arts identify as artists and whether they develop their artistic practices in traditional arts programs or through other means.

These forms of emerging artistic practice don’t exist in isolation — artists require networks to circulate, evolve, and gain audiences.[5] Arts organizations have striven to keep pace with technological innovations, incorporating social media, mobile apps, games, internet resources, and online events into their offerings.[6] The 2014 report, Like, link, share: How cultural institutions are embracing digital technology, commissioned by the Wyncote Foundation, described the benefits of these innovative practices, including “larger and often younger audiences, deeper audience engagement, new community relationships, new revenue, and renewed program vitality.”[7] However, the intersection of arts and technology is not limited to engaging with audiences through arts organizations. Content creators work with emerging formats online, in public spaces, and with non-arts organizations, generating funders’ interest in learning how this dynamic ecosystem is functioning, how these artists support their creative endeavors, and how better to support these networks in sustainable ways.

This study responds in part to the NEA’s FY 2017-2021 Research Agenda, which calls for new investments in exploratory studies that describe factors that enhance or inhibit arts participation and/or arts/cultural assets, including the arts-and-cultural workforce. By fully understanding how artists are incorporating technology into their creative work, and by learning more about the current and prospective sources of support for these artistic practices, the NEA can make informed decisions on how to leverage greater support for this field. This qualitative study will respond to the following research questions:

  1. How do artists incorporate technology in their artistic practices?
  2. What is the range of examples of such work across artistic disciplines and technology platforms? Are there categories or classifications for identifying this work, by genre or sub-discipline or by type of technology used?
  3. What is the range of career paths or trajectories taken by artists working with technology? Across artistic disciplines, how are these pathways similar or different?
  4. How do artists working with technology participate in cross-sectoral and/or cross-disciplinary partnerships, and/or in their local creative economies? How are these relationships formed and to what purpose? What
  5. are the associated risks, challenges, and opportunities for artists?
  6. What are current and prospective sources of support for artistic practices using technology, and how might they be improved and/or sustained?
  7. What types of technical training and resources are used and needed to support artistic practices using technology? What gaps in training and resources currently exist for these artists, across artistic disciplines and technology platforms?
  8. What are current and emergent models for supporting artistic practices (financially and non-financially) using technology? Across artistic disciplines, how are these models similar or different?
  9. What are organizational risks, challenges, and opportunities in supporting artists working with technology? How do these differ among for-profit and non-profit organizations? By sector, artistic discipline, and/or technology platform?The NEA will convene a Technical Working Group of stakeholders in the arts and technology fields, including, but not limited to, artists, arts presenters and curators, arts researchers, tech industry representatives and other funders working at this intersection. The Technical Working Group will provide feedback on the research plan, selected deliverables, and the dissemination of study findings, and will recommend participants in the roundtables, interviews, and case studies.

It is strongly advised that proposals include as appropriate subcontractors with substantial subject matter expertise and past research experience in the field of contemporary arts and technology, the cultural creative economy, and the ecosystem of artists, institutions, funding entities, and other organizations working at the intersection of contemporary arts and technology.

C.2 PROJECT SCOPE

The project scope is described below. Note that the Contractor’s research plan, which should reflect input from the NEA Project Director and the Technical Working Group, will finalize specific project activities, including deliverables. The project will be implemented in two distinct phases; Phase 1 focuses on research, and Phase 2 focuses on dissemination of study findings.

Phase 1

Attend a project kick-off meeting with the NEA Project Director

Prepare a detailed timeline and work plan, including regular communications with NEA Project Director

  • Prepare a research plan and execute the first phase of the study. At a minimum, the research study shall include:
    • Literature scan of research papers, conference proceedings, reports, and other relevant publications and analysis of selected NEA grant project descriptions
    • Data collection through:
      • Group discussions taking place at 4 regional roundtables and one virtual roundtable;
      • Individual interviews with up to 20 field experts, including, but not limited to, artists, heads of leading art and technology schools, cultural institution leaders, artist service organization staff, public and private sector funders, and others
      • Case studies with 10 artists engaging with technology
    • Prepare interim and final reports presenting study findings

Phase 2

  • Support the dissemination of report findings through:
    • Presentations and discussion taking place at 7 in-person roundtables;
    • Series of 10 briefs or articles commissioned from media arts stakeholders, including, but not limited to, artists, artist service organization staff, and cultural institution leaders.

C.3 DETAILED SPECIFICATIONS

The Contractor shall perform the following tasks:

Phase I

  1. Project Kick-off Meeting

The Contractor shall meet with the NEA Project Director, Contracting Officer and selected agency staff to review the project purposes and tasks. Meeting time will not exceed two (2) hours. This meeting may take place on-site or via videoconference or teleconference. Within a week, the Contractor shall prepare a memorandum (Deliverable #1) summarizing the discussion and making note of decisions made.

  1. Timeline/Work Plan/Communications

The Contractor shall prepare a timeline and brief work plan (Deliverable #2) for accomplishing the remaining tasks of the contract, incorporating input from the kick-off meeting. The Contractor shall first submit a draft timeline and work plan for review by the Project Director following the kick-off meeting. Following the receipt of feedback from the Project Director, the Contractor shall prepare and submit a final timeline and work plan, which will include a meeting schedule and schedule for all deliverables inclusive of multiple drafts and deliverable review periods. The work plan shall include participation in regular teleconferences with the Project Director (not to exceed once a week) and preparation of brief minutes documenting decisions made at these meetings.

  1. Research Plan Development

The Contractor shall prepare a detailed research plan (Deliverable #3). In addition to the required elements as prescribed in the statement of work, other components may be added to the research plan at the Government’s discretion. Primary methods for the research study shall include the literature scan, including an analysis of selected NEA grant project descriptions; group discussions taking place at up to 7 NEA-organized regional roundtables and a national convening; up to 20 field expert interviews; and case studies with 10 artists.  The research plan also shall describe how the Contractor intends to comply with relevant Federal laws and regulations, including the Paperwork Reduction Act.

The Contractor shall submit a draft research plan for review by the Project Director and NEA team. Following receipt of feedback from the NEA, the Contractor shall prepare and submit a final research plan to include all protocols for interviews, group discussions, etc., and templates of communications that will be sent to study participants. Because of the iterative nature of this study, a detailed case-study plan may be omitted from the research plan at this stage, provided it is added to the research plan after the national convening. Once the NEA has approved the research plan, the Contractor may proceed with conducting the study.

The research plan shall not exceed 40 pages in length (inclusive of appendices; all proposed data collection instruments should be included in an appendix). The plan shall include:

  1. Updated research questions;
  2. A description of the research design;
  3. Identification of data collection methods and protocols;
  4. An analytical plan, including a description of qualitative analysis procedures;
  5. Sampling strategies for each research task;
  6. An overall study timeline;
  7. An approach to the protection of human subjects/consent strategy (as appropriate), including copies of consent forms/protocols;
  8. A communications plan, including copies of correspondence with study participants; and
  9. A reporting/dissemination plan, including a proposed table of contents for the final report
  10. Conduct Literature Scan & Grant Analysis

During the first phase of research, the Contractor shall plan and conduct a brief literature scan of research papers, conference proceedings, reports, and other relevant publications on how artists are incorporating technology into their work and the infrastructure and ecosystem supporting these artists. The NEA Project Director shall provide some literature resources; however, the Contractor is expected to identify other pertinent resources. The Contractor shall budget sufficient funds to include up to 20 resources in the literature scan. The literature scan deliverable shall consist of a table that presents for each resource the citation, relevant research question(s), and summary of relevant content responding to the research question(s), accompanied by a summary report (not exceeding 15 pages) that presents findings organized by research question (Deliverable #4). The literature scan findings shall be incorporated into the draft report as part of task 5.

The Contractor also shall conduct an analysis of project descriptions of selected grants awards for the last five years; NEA staff will select for analysis no more than 150 grant projects. For most recent awards (2016-2017), the available narrative is mostly limited to project descriptions found in grant applications typically not exceeding one page in length. For older awards (2013-2015), written responses to final report questions will be made available to the Contractor; the Contractor should anticipate up to four pages of text per final report. Quantitative project data are also available for analysis. In analyzing data, the Contractor is expected to use both qualitative and quantitative methods. The grant project analysis shall be incorporated into the Deliverable #4 summary report.

  1. Facilitate Group Discussions at Regional Roundtables

In close coordination with the Project Director, the Contractor shall facilitate large group discussions at 4 Regional Roundtables (Detroit, MI: New Orleans, LA; New York City, NY; San Jose, CA) and one virtual roundtable. Up to 15 artists, heads of leading art and technology schools, cultural institution leaders, artist service organization staff, public and private sector funders, and others shall be invited to participate in these roundtables. The Contractor shall be responsible for the following tasks for each roundtable (as appropriate):

  • Invite field experts to the event (NEA will propose a list of invitees);
  • Book the meeting space and arrange for all conference incidentals such as, but not limited to, A/V rentals (regional roundtables only) or schedule the webinar (virtual roundtable only)
  • Arrange and pay for travel, lodging, and meals for attendees in accordance with Federal Travel Regulations and published GSA per diem rates (regional roundtables only);
  • Handle on-site attendee registration (regional roundtables only);
  • Facilitate the large group discussion;
  • Draft all meeting materials, including pre-meeting mailings/background material and materials for the event; and
  • Prepare a brief report summarizing the discussion (Deliverable #5).

The Contractor shall be responsible for arranging and paying for travel, meals, and lodging for attendees; and arranging and paying for all meeting-related costs, including, but not limited to, venue rental, audio-visual equipment rental, and other expenses. These costs should be reflected in the Contractor’s proposal in response to this statement of work. The NEA anticipates that all venues will be donated and that 25% of roundtable participants will be local and therefore will not require travel arrangements.

The key deliverable associated with this task is a draft report not to exceed 20 pages that identifies key findings from this stage of research, organized by research question (Deliverable #6); this report shall form the basis for the final project report (7).

  1. Conduct Interviews with Field Experts

The Contractor shall conduct in-depth interviews with up to 20 artists and other field experts identified through the Regional Roundtables. The Contractor shall prepare for NEA review and approval a recommended list of interviewees prior to initiating contact with experts. The Contractor shall conduct interviews without NEA logistical support, although the Project Director retains the right to audit selected interviews with advance notice provided to the Contractor.

Following the interviews, the Contractor shall update the report drafted for task 5 with key findings from the interviews, organized by research question (Deliverable #8). The report should not exceed 40 pages at this stage. The Contractor shall also provide transcripts of all interviews as a separate deliverable (Deliverable #7).

  1. Conduct Case Studies and Complete Final Report

The Contractor shall conduct case studies with 10 artists. It is anticipated that the case studies will incorporate observations (online; up to 6 case studies may be conducted in-person), repeated interviews with the artist, interviews with other individuals that are part of the artist’s ecosystem (including, but not limited to, heads of leading art and technology schools, cultural institution leaders, artist service organization staff, audience members and/or patrons, and public and private sector funders), and other documentation or data available from interviewees or in the public domain. The Contractor shall prepare for NEA review and approval a recommended list of interviewees prior to initiating contact with experts. The Contractor shall conduct case studies mostly without the agency’s logistical support, although the Project Director retains the right to audit selected interviews with advance notice provided to the Contractor.  In analyzing data, the Contractor is expected to use both qualitative and quantitative methods.

Following the field work, the Contractor shall update and finalize the report drafted for task 5 with key findings and case studies, organized by research question and also presented as vignettes within the report (Deliverable #9). The final report shall also highlight areas for further investigation and propose specific policy recommendations for the NEA and other stakeholders. The final report should align with the reporting/dissemination plan presented in the approved Research Plan. The report should not exceed 100 pages at this stage. The Contractor shall expect up to three rounds of feedback from the project director and other NEA staff on this report. At least one of these rounds of feedback will reflect input from the Technical Working Group. The Contractor may opt for a work session with agency staff instead of one round of feedback.

Phase 2

  1. Commission and Produce Briefs or Articles

In close coordination with the NEA Media Arts Director and Director of Strategic Communications and Public Affairs, the Contractor shall commission and produce a series of 10 briefs or articles from media arts stakeholders, including, but not limited to, artists, artist service organization staff, and cultural institution leaders. Each brief or article should not exceed 1,500 words. The NEA will provide a list of proposed writers and topics to the Contractor. It is the Contractor’s responsibility to contract with individual writers and manage the brief/article production process, including editing and finalizing the text documents. The deliverable for this task is a set of 10 briefs/articles in Microsoft Word format (Deliverable # 10). The final briefs/articles will be posted by the NEA Public Affairs team. The recommended stipend for each writer is $1,500.

  1. Facilitate Regional Roundtables

In close coordination with the NEA Media Arts Director and Director of Strategic Communications and Public Affairs, the Contractor shall plan and implement Regional Roundtable discussions in 7 locations across the country (Charlotte, NC; Denver, CO; Detroit, MI; New Orleans, LA; New York City, NY; St. Paul, MN; San Jose, CA). Up to 15 media arts stakeholders, including artists, heads of leading art and technology schools, cultural institution leaders, artist service organization staff, public and private sector funders, and others, shall be invited to participate in these roundtables. The Contractor shall be responsible for the following tasks for each roundtable (as appropriate):

  • Invite field stakeholders to the event (NEA will propose a list of invitees);
  • Book the meeting space and arrange A/V rentals and other conference items (as appropriate);
  • Arrange and pay for travel, lodging, and meals in accordance with…(See above language in section 5) for attendees;
  • Handle on-site attendee registration;
  • Facilitate the roundtable;
  • Draft all roundtable materials, including pre-meeting mailings/background material and materials for the event; and
  • Prepare notes summarizing the discussion.

The Contractor shall be responsible for arranging and paying for travel, meals, and lodging for attendees; and arranging and paying for all meeting-related costs, including, but not limited to, venue rental, audio-visual equipment rental, , and other expenses. These costs should be reflected in the Contractor’s proposal in response to this statement of work. The NEA anticipates that all venues will be donated and that 25% of roundtable participants will be local and therefore will not require travel arrangements.

The key deliverable associated with this task is a draft report not to exceed 10 pages that summarizes the discussion at each event (Deliverable #11).

  1. 4 Requirements for All Report Deliverables

Each report deliverable resulting from this contract will include a Microsoft Word version. Consistent with other NEA publications, this report should follow The Chicago Manual of Style and the NEA style guide, which will be provided to the Contractor at the time of award. Electronic versions of all tables, charts, graphs, and data visualizations should be submitted in the program that was used to create them (e.g., Excel, Photoshop, Tableau), and the Contractor shall work with NEA staff to determine an appropriate and compatible file format to use. The Contractor shall be responsible for ensuring compatibility of submissions.

This is a tentatively proposed timeline. The timeline is subject to change at the NEA’s discretion up to contract award.

Project Phase/Task Key Deliverables (see numbered deliverables in Detailed Specifications section)* Due Date
(Weeks after Kick-off Mtg)
1. Project Kick-off Meeting 1. Memorandum 2 weeks
2. Timeline/Work Plan/Communications 2. Timeline / work plan 3 weeks
3. Research Plan Development 3. Research plan 10 weeks
4. Conduct Literature Scan & Grant Analysis 4. Summary report with table 16 weeks
5. Facilitate Group Discussions at Regional Roundtables 5. Individual regional roundtable reports 20-32 weeks (variable)
6. Draft study report 34 weeks
6. Conduct Interviews with Field Experts 7. Interview transcripts 39 weeks
8. Updated draft study report 40 weeks
7. Conduct Case Studies and Complete Final Report 9. Final study report 54 weeks
8 Commission and Produce Briefs or Articles 10. Series of 10 commissioned briefs/articles 66 weeks
9. Facilitate Regional Roundtables 11. Roundtable report 75 weeks

 

* The Contractor shall provide for up to three (3) rounds of feedback from the Project Director on all draft deliverables unless otherwise indicated in Section C.3. This process is accounted for in the proposed timeline.

**This schedule assumes that Paperwork Reduction Act clearance will not be required.

C.5 KEY PERSONNEL QUALIFICATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS:

Project Director

Education: Master’s degree

Years of Experience:  At least 5 years technical experience conducting projects similar in scope to the present study; 4 years supervisory experience

Experience & Other Requirements: Experience leading research studies that involve literature reviews; collecting information through interviews, large group discussions, and case studies; conducting landscape analyses of infrastructure needs; producing briefs; and planning and facilitating large group meetings that have involved professional presentations and extensive travel arrangements. Experience supervising projects similar in scope. Demonstrated ability to effectively and professionally interact with government program managers, the COR, and public stakeholders.

 

Subject Matter Expert

Education: Bachelor’s degree

Years of Experience:  At least 5 years technical experience in the field of media arts research

Experience & Other Requirements: Experience in research on digital and emerging media, artists, and arts organizations. The individual must have conducted prior research in the field of contemporary arts and technology, the cultural creative economy, and/or the ecosystem of artists, institutions, funding entities, and other organizations working at the intersection of contemporary arts and technology.

 

[1]http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/internet-broadband/

 

[2] http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/mobile/

 

[3] http://www.pewinternet.org/fact-sheet/social-media/

 

[4] https://makinganewreality.org/categories-of-emerging-media-ab120b65ee5c#4e52

 

[5] https://makinganewreality.org/defining-emerging-media-b48794e15138

 

[6] http://www.pewinternet.org/2013/01/04/arts-organizations-and-digital-technologies/

 

[7]  http://likelinkshare.org/about/

 

us national academy of sciences convene the “art-science-technology” villages of practice

Colleagues

The US National Academies of Science, Medicine and Engineering are convening our community of art/sci/tech practice to discuss and further the recommendations in the report they issued on how to think anew about integrating the arts and humanities, including design, into higher education science/engineering/math and medicine – this will be a real gathering of our villages and tribes-  its been a 20 year process of convincing the us national academies to take the stem to steam movement ( or whatever you prefer to call it ) seriously – perhaps we can leverage this to convince academies in science in other countries to get to work !!

Roger Malina

 

Mark your calendars for the National Convening on the Integration of Arts, Humanities, and STEMM* in Higher Education on April 12, 2019 in Washington, DC! The event is brought to you by the Board on Higher Education and Workforce of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The National Academies will convene hundreds of leaders and practitioners in education, workforce, policy, and industry.

Given that today’s challenges and opportunities are at once technical and human, addressing them calls for the full range of human knowledge and creativity. Higher education should strive to offer all students–regardless of degree or area of concentration–an education that exposes them to diverse forms of human knowledge and inquiry. Through this event the National Academies will convene thought leaders and practitioners and shed light on teaching approaches that will empower students to learn and apply knowledge in real-world settings. Join us for a day of inspiring and informative conversations on improving higher education to better prepare students for work, life, and citizenship.

Register for a free admission via EventBrite and check www.nas.edu/branches soon for more details! For inquiries about this event email: Irene Ngun at ingun@nas.edu

 

Date And Time

Fri, April 12, 2019

9:00 AM – 5:00 PM EDT

Add to Calendar

Location

Washington

National Academy of Sciences

2101 Constitution Avenue NW

Washington, DC 20418

View Map

US National Academies Town Hall meeting Dallas Feb 6- Integrating Arts and Humanities into STEM in Higher ed

colleagues

Two announcements =Second the ATEC watering hole, and First the
visit of Ashley Bear, Co Author of the National Academies report
on Integrating the Arts and Humanities in STEM Higher Ed

National Academies Town Hall meeting on UTD campus
Feb 6 Ashley Bear will give a town hall meeting on Feb 6 at 2pm – contact me for details-we are also hosting a private by invitation dinner in the evening-contact me if you would like to attend

for those of you who havent read the national academies report it is available free on line at
http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/bhew/branches/index.htm 
this report is an important next step in stem to steam.

HE REPORT: AT A GLANCE
This study examined an important trend in higher education: integration of the humanities and arts with sciences, engineering, and medicine at the undergraduate and graduate level—which proponents argue will better prepare students for work,
life, and citizenship. Integrative models intentionally seek to bridge the knowledge, modes of inquiry, and pedagogies from multiple disciplines—the humanities, arts, sciences, engineering, technology, mathematics, and medicine—within the context
of a single course or program of study. A diverse array of colleges and universities now offer students integrative courses and programs, and many faculty are enthusiastic advocates for this educational approach. This movement in higher education raises an important question: what impact do these curricular approaches have on students?

To address this question, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine formed a 22-member committee to examine “the evidence behind the assertion that educational programs that mutually integrate learning experiences in
the humanities and arts with science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) lead to improved educational and career outcomes for undergraduate
and graduate students.” The committee conducted an in-depth review and analysis of the state of knowledge on the impact of integrative approaches on students.

The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree is now available to download on the National Academies Press website. You may also request to purchase a hard copy of this report.

 

so first – ATEC Watering Hole ( we are still trying to come up with
a new name) followed by salon at linda andersons

ATEC Watering Hole Announcement Fri Feb 1

Please join us Friday, February 1st in the ArtSciLab (ATEC 3.209) from 4-6pm for this week’s Watering Hole. Professors Heidi Cooley and Paul Fishwick will be moderating a discussion on the topic of forming connections and associations.

Professors  Cooley and Fishwick argue that one of the defining of our species is the ability to abstract and to create connections between concepts and ideas. These connections will be explored by way of a catalyst, spurring discussion. The moderators will begin discussion my presenting a video of kinetic artist Reuben Margolin to invite audience members to create connections using the video as a connecting agent.

After the Watering Hole as concluded, our dear friend Linda Anderson will be hosting a Salon gathering modeled on Gertrude Stein’s famous Paris Salon, featuring food, drink, artwork, books, and wonderful company. All are welcome!

Details:

Watering Hole: ArtSciLab, ATEC 3.209, 4-6PM

Salon: On campus, 428, starting at 6:30PM

One of the defining attributes of our species is the ability to abstract and to create connections between concepts and ideas. Sometimes, these connections can be explored by way of a a catalyst, which spurs discussion. We have chosen a general blog post on connections but more importantly, a video of kinetic artist Reuben Margolin. We will start the podjam by showing the video and invite audience members to create connections using the video as a connecting agent.

FOR Watering Hole 2.1.2019

– Salon @ 428 – 6:30pm

– modeled on Gertrude Steins Paris Salon featuring food, 8 i0drink, artwork, books and me

And please come- contact me if you need a parking permit

National Academies Town Hall meeting on UTD campus
AND THEN: Feb V Ashley Bear will give a town hall meeting on Feb 6 at 2pm – contact me for details-we are also hosting a private by invitation dinner in the evening-contact me if you would like to attend

for those of you who havent read the national academies report it is available free on line at
http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/bhew/branches/index.htm 
this report is an important next step in stem to steam

Roger Malina

THE REPORT: AT A GLANCE
This study examined an important trend in higher education: integration of the humanities and arts with sciences, engineering, and medicine at the undergraduate and graduate level—which proponents argue will better prepare students for work,
life, and citizenship. Integrative models intentionally seek to bridge the knowledge, modes of inquiry, and pedagogies from multiple disciplines—the humanities, arts, sciences, engineering, technology, mathematics, and medicine—within the context
of a single course or program of study. A diverse array of colleges and universities now offer students integrative courses and programs, and many faculty are enthusiastic advocates for this educational approach. This movement in higher education raises an important question: what impact do these curricular approaches have on students?

To address this question, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine formed a 22-member committee to examine “the evidence behind the assertion that educational programs that mutually integrate learning experiences in
the humanities and arts with science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) lead to improved educational and career outcomes for undergraduate
and graduate students.” The committee conducted an in-depth review and analysis of the state of knowledge on the impact of integrative approaches on students.

The Integration of the Humanities and Arts with Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Higher Education: Branches from the Same Tree is now available to download on the National Academies Press website. You may also request to purchase a hard copy of this report.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS LEONARDO/ISAST Leonardo/ISAST EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AT Arizona State University

 ASU-Leonardo Executive Director/Professor of Practice
Job #12734
https://sfis.asu.edu/jobs 

Colleagues

We are delighted to announce that the Leonardo 50th celebrations all around our planet culminated in a an amazing partnership agreement between the Leonardo non profit ISAST and Arizona State University. As part of this a full time position as Executive Director of Leonardo/ISAST has been posted, which includes appointment as a professor of practice at the University.

All our current projects will continue, including our relationship with MIT and MIT Press, but the hope is the new Executive Director will redesign with the community Leonardo, its objectives and methods and work with you to launch the Leonardo network of villages on new paths enabled by this partnership.

Please circulate the ad: https://sfis.asu.edu/jobs there is NO insider favorite candidate- this is wide open !

here are the details

Description:

Arizona State University and the Institute for Studies in the Arts, Sciences, and Technology (ISAST)/Leonardo seek a dynamic leader to take the helm of a new partnership between the two organizations. The Executive Director position will carry an appointment as a Professor of Practice in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society and the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. The Executive Director is the Chief Executive Officer of the Leonardo/International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (Leonardo/ISAST, an independent 501c3 corporation registered in California). The Executive Director reports to the ASU-led Personnel Committee of the ISAST Board of Directors, and is responsible for the organization’s consistent achievement of its mission and financial objectives.

About ASU

Arizona State University is a new model for American higher education, an unprecedented combination of academic excellence, entrepreneurial energy and broad access. This New American University (http://newamericanuniversity.asu.edu/) is a single, unified institution comprising four differentiated campuses positively impacting the economic, social, cultural and environmental health of the communities it serves. Its research is inspired by real-world application, blurring the boundaries that traditionally separate academic disciplines. ASU serves more than 80,000 students in metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, the nation’s fifth largest city. ASU champions intellectual and cultural diversity, and welcomes students from all fifty states and more than one hundred nations across the globe.

About the School for the Future of Innovation in Society

Among the newest elements of ASU’s approach to building a New American University, the School for the Future of Innovation in Society (SFIS; sfis.asu.edu) provides robust opportunities for intellectual fusion, use-inspired research, and global engagement via ongoing projects and centers. SFIS hosts a comprehensive set of graduate and undergraduate degrees and certificates.  Collaborative opportunities will exist with the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes (CSPO; www.cspo.org) – consistently ranked one of the top science and technology policy think tanks in the world – and the emerging Institute for the Future of Innovation in Society.

About the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts

ASU’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, the largest comprehensive design and arts school in the nation, is a vibrant example of the of the New American University philosophy. With nearly 5,000 students, more than 400 faculty and faculty associates, 135 degree options and a tradition of top-ranked programs, the Herberger Institute is built on a combination of disciplines unlike any other program in the nation. The institute includes the School of Art, School of Arts, Media and Engineering, The Design School, School of Film, Dance and Theatre, School of Music, and the ASU Art Museum. Through recognizing that design and the arts are critical resources for transforming society and solving complex problems, ASU’s Herberger Institute is committed to positioning artists, scholars, designers, and educators at the center of public life. For more information on the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, visit herbergerinstitute.asu.edu

About Leonardo/The International Society for Arts, Sciences and Technology

Leonardo/The International Society for Arts, Sciences and Technology (Leonardo/ISAST) is a 501c3 nonprofit that serves a global network of distinguished scholars, artists, scientists, researchers and thinkers through our programs focused on interdisciplinary innovation in the arts, sciences and technology. From our beginnings in 1968, we have served as THE virtual community for purposes of networking, resource-sharing, best practices, research, documentation and events in art, science and technology. More at Leonardo.info

Position responsibilities:

  • Create synergy between Leonardo and ASU in art/science activities to achieve global leadership and recognized brand for the two entities.
  • Enterprise/business development, including enhancing earned revenue and fundraising through corporate sponsors, grants and large donor contributions.
  • Lead a community-engaged enterprise design process, manage institutional change in reflection of that process.
  • Assure that the organization has a long-range strategy which achieves its mission, and toward which it makes consistent and timely progress.
  • Be responsible for the recruitment, employment, and release of all personnel, both paid staff and volunteers; maintain a climate that attracts, keeps, and motivates a diverse staff of top-quality people.
  • Oversee Oakland office management and business requirements, execution of all contracts with ISAST including MIT Press.
  • Jointly, with the chairman and secretary of the board of directors, conduct official correspondence of the organization, and jointly, with designated officers, execute legal documents.
  • Work with the staff, Finance Committee, and the board in preparing a budget; see that the organization operates within budget guidelines and in accordance with sound financial practices and with the consent and oversight of the Leonardo/ISAST board of directors.
  • Maintain official records and documents, and ensure compliance with federal, state and local regulations and with the consent and oversight of the Leonardo/ISAST board of directors.
  • Liaison with ISAST board, ex-officio member; see that the board is kept fully informed on the condition of the organization and all important factors influencing it.

Minimum qualifications:

  • Terminal degree; or Bachelor’s degree and exceptional professional experience.
  • Demonstrated ability to mediate between the interests of academic and public constituents, and operational staff.
  • Demonstrated understanding of transdisciplinary, collaborative research and practice.

Desired qualifications:

  • Demonstrated success in grant-seeking, fundraising and/or corporate/foundation relations.
  • Understanding of culture of transdisciplinary practice (i.e. intersection of arts, sciences and technology).
  • Demonstrated ability to work with agile, distributed teams.
  • Experience in or demonstrated potential for innovation in next generation publishing and knowledge dissemination.
  • Experience in and with advanced technology for communication and/or visualization.
  • Experience in venture development and scaling of business/enterprise.
  • Experience in managing transmedia enterprises with international markets and scale.
  • Experience in developing and maintaining positive relationships with international constituencies, with a particular focus on Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
  • Understanding of current academic publishing industry.

 Instructions to Apply:

To apply, please submit: 1) a detailed cover letter that includes a description of the applicant’s administrative experience and research and teaching interests (limited to 4 pages); 2) a current Curriculum Vitae; and 3) the names, email addresses and telephone numbers of three references. All materials should be submitted as a single PDF document to sfis@asu.edu. Review of applications will begin Friday March 8, 2019 and, if not filled, a review will occur every Friday thereafter until the search is closed. ASU conducts pre-employment screening for all positions which includes a criminal background check, verification of work history, academic credentials, licenses and certifications.

Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer committed to excellence through diversity (see ASU’s Prohibition Against Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation policy at http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html). All qualified applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis protected by law (see ASU’s Title IX policy at https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/). Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. 


Lets Redesign Space Exploration for the 21stC: meet at Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India

In previous blogs I have argued that we need to resign science itself, both its methods and social embedding need urgent transition re-design. As a space scientist myself, I am convinced we need to rethink the purposes and methods of space science and exploration, and that artists, designers and humanists must collaborate with scientists and engineers to do this.

Leonardo/OLATS is launching a new series of space art and society workshops in Paris – and I am pleased to announce our collaboration on
Technology, Exchange and Flow: India Michael Punt, Sundar Sarukkai from the Leonardo Editorial board and myself will be working with our colleagues in India together with Joanna Griffin and Hannah Grason.

What indeed are the hoped for social outcomes do we project for space science and space activities over the next century ? China and India are now shaping new futures in space as the US, Russia, Europe and other space faring powers rethink their efforts.

As a heart warming celebration the Chinese Rover: https://www.space.com/42981-china-moon-far-side-panorama-chang-e-4.html landed on the Von Karman crater on the far side of the moon. Theodore Von Karman was the Phd Advisor for my Father Frank Malina, co founder and first director of NASA JPL that led the first team to launch an object into outer space. He was also the advisor to Hsue-Shen Tsien, the father of the Chinese space program. Yes Von Karman, Malina and Tsien are now reunited on the far side of the moon !! The work of those students at Caltech certainly changed the history of ideas and human culture ! Note, Tsien and Malina also have the honor of being spaceship captains in our of Arthur C Clarke’s novels. Fact and fictions are symbiotic !

The Leonardo Space and the Arts working group : https://www.olats.org/space/space.php has organised a number of events including a Space and Culture Workshop in Bangalore in 2007- see Patrick McCrays commentary; http://www.patrickmccray.com/2014/07/16/sir-thats-not-a-footprint/ http://www.patrickmccray.com/2014/07/16/sir-thats-not-a-footprint/ 

So it with immense pleasure that we encourage you to visit the
writing workshops at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2018 and if you are interested in joining the Space Arts email list, contact me:T

Technology, Exchange and Flow: India


An AHRC Impact and Engagement project to: (1) make a film reconstructing lost television material from the Indian Space Research Organisation’s television archive, (2) run writing workshops at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2018 addressing audience and user-led initiatives in India, and, (3) produce a series of publications by non-academics for Leonardo journal. 

Technology, Exchange and Flow: India

Professor Michael Punt along with colleagues Dr Joanna Griffin and Dr Hannah Drayson, from Transtechnolgy Research, University of Plymouth, UK have received an award from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, UK to produce a film and run a writing workshop at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India in partnership with Leonardo. The funding builds on the research and knowledge exchange outcomes of a three-year European project, Technology, Exchange and Flow and further research subsequently undertaken as part of the Marie Curie ITN CogNovo, led by Professor Sue Denham. The underpinning research was based in two archives in the Netherlands over a six-year period and examined the relationship between artistic media practices and industrial/commercial exploitation of audio-visual media at key moments of technological innovation, such as contemporary gaming and early television. It revealed the relationship between creativity and innovation within the European media sector through contemporary and historical examples and indicated how user-led initiatives impacted on technological and media form.

The film reconstructs lost television material from the 1970s made by students at the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad in collaboration with space scientists from the Indian Space Research Organisation and children in villages, for a unique experiment in local, audience-led satellite television. The writing workshop, run in partnership with Leonardo, will establish a continuity with the film and is intended to explore the Biennale as an audience-led endeavor. The workshop will include collaborative public writing sessions as well as podcast production for the Creative Disturbance platform that will articulate the findings of both a Technology, Exchange and Flow and CogNovo in knowledge exchange formats that are consistent with the altruistic concerns of the Kochi-Muziris Biennale and the Indian Space Research Organization television archive.

https://www.cognovo.eu/

The Best Christmas Present from my Daughter

Colleagues

First a happy end of the year.

Like some lucky families on the planet, we are spending the holidays together. In our case Christine and I are with my brother Alan, and his adult children Sophia and Michael, and with our grown children Giselle, Yuri and Xavier and his significant other Olivia. We are all type A personalities, engaged in rewarding productive professional pursuits, and at this time piloting safely through the chaos of life.

Looking back, it’s sometimes hard to believe how lucky we are as parents. But, as a scientist, I would be hard put to summarise the conclusions and recommendations from our family experiments for those embarking on their own experiments in child rearing.

Maybe there should be required parent training, with a permit for parenting, as we require for driving, a much less dangerous activity. But then maybe given the struggles and inadequacies of our school systems, we should leave it to chance as we now do !

This blog is prompted by our daughter Giselle informing me that her first peer reviewed article has been accepted by a medical journal. She has ok’ed my publishing her abstract ahead of publication. The article is titled:

Consent for Unaccompanied Minors in Immigration Detention;  Advocating for Protection from Coercive Practices  : by Giselle Malina

Accepted for publication in:    The AMA Journal of Bioethics.

For reasons that have nothing to do with our parenting, from an early age she was interested in medicine. She took emergency medical training as a teenager, volunteered in clinics in Africa and South America, volunteered in a refugee camp in Greece with Syrian refugees. And now she is finishing medical school, with an interest in surgery (very far from Christine and my comfort zones ).

Her peer reviewed article studies the way a government, in this case the US government, separates children from their parents as ‘illegal immigrants’. Under-age minors are then treated medically, against the child’s will, and with no other consenting adult except the state. Often the children are medicated, drugged, to ‘calm them down’ if they are disruptive, angry or unhappy ( which would seem to be a perfectly desirable behavior of the children in their situation).

As an educator I am often ‘in loco’ parentis, as our governments are, in refugee or detention camps, but in my case a university. Empathy is easy to write about as is fashionable today, difficult to practice day to day.

So yes, Christine and I are proud that our daughter had her first peer reviewed article published. And in a topic embodying values that our own parents shared as traumatized survivors of World War II.  My parents help set up UNESCO, and Christine’s mother dedicated her later years to “remembering for the future”, to learn the lessons from the Nazi Holocaust.

In addition, both Christine and my fathers were pioneers in the new post WWII systems of scholarly and academic publishing that seeks, but doesn’t always succeed, at making sure the good stuff rises to the topic and the poor and fake stuff sinks to the bottom.

It’s not yet clear, as recent events reinforce, that our parent’s generation succeeded in setting in motion the redesign of our cultures. It’s clear a deep redesign is needed to prevent WWIII, never mind our forthcoming extinction in the Anthropocene.

Nor that our own generation is doing any better at re-imagining a new ‘enlightenment’ for the 21st century.

Redesigning culture it turns out is not just a matter of writing new laws and governmental structures as our parents perhaps hoped. It’s an iterative everyday process to enable complex system to ‘transition’ to a different behavior. I recently was exposed to the thinking of on transition design which may help as part of serving ‘in loco parentis’ for our planetary ecology.

So maybe parental training should include transition design to help their children transition to adulthood, and then to tackle the transitioning our culture to prevent ecological collapse ?

In the meantime, here is the Abstract of the article by Giselle that was just accepted.

Abstract:

Currently, the Office of Refugee Resettlement and detention facilities determine appropriate medical care for unaccompanied minors in immigration detention. This care may not be in the best interest of the child. In contrast, the juvenile detention system and medical research rely on child advocates and court orders to insure the best interest of the child, and avoid undue influence or coercive practices. With current policies increasing the number of minors and their length of time spent in detention, it is urgent that the medical community advocate for these same safeguards to be put in place for this vulnerable population.

Happy end of the year, whatever culture you belong to.

Roger Malina

The pacific rim art science technology community invites you to south korea

colleagues

ISEA is in south korea next year and is shaping up as an
amazing gathering of the communities of practice around the pacific rim and beyond

the guidelines for submitting proposals is available at

http://isea2019.isea-international.org/submiGuide.asp  

help us redesign and rethink what the enlightenment could mean in the 21st century
lux aeterna is the overall bridging theme

deadline is in a couple of weeks

am in Dartington

LUX AETERNA
  • Aeternitas Eternity of
    the Mortal
  • Symphonia Harmony of Noise
  • Illuminatio Enlightenment of
    A.I (Artificial
    Intelligence) & A.E
    (Artificial Emotion)
  • Penumbra In-between
Major Topic
Lux Aeterna (Eternal Light)

A topic inspired by the literal meaning of the host city Gwangju, “City of Light”, includes subcategories embracing complex themes that allow open interpretations in culture, science, and history. For example, religiously, light implies divinity and immortality. Scientifically, it is an energy collection of particles and wavelength signals. It symbolizes the enlightenment and rationale in humanities. Also, the presence of light creates Umbra and Penumbra. In light of the fact that light is the most specific example of versatility in which various interpretations can occur, it will provide us with the context where cohesion of procedural logic based on the human sensibilities and technology of artistic inspirations is freely presented, which is in line with what ISEA has been pursuing.

Detailed Topic
Aeternitas : Eternity of the Mortal

Death is the golden key that opens the palace of eternity. – John Milton

※ Related Research Fields:
Bio Art, Neuroscience, Hypernatural, Technological Singularity, Human Brain, Artificial Life, Brain-Computer Interface, Digital Undertaker, ‘Right to be forgotten vs. Freedom of expression, etc.

This topic includes various perspectives associated with the eternity of the human being. Humans are finite beings. In contrast to their physicality, their achievements embody transcendental personalities beyond time. Scientific research, on the other hand, denies time transcendence because it is based on the experimental modification. In the near future with the technology’s singularity, humans may have to confront a moment to make a decision whether to physically gain an eternal life or to bestow transcendent personalities upon their traces. We look for works and researches in the theme of eternity and mortality that are inspired by religious, scientific, humanistic, and artistic aspects.

Symphonia : Harmony of Noise

The universe is not required to be in perfect harmony with human ambition. – Carl Sagan

※ Related Research Fields :
Sound and Music Computing, Signal Processing, Computer Graphics, Computer Vision, Socio-Technical System, Data Science, Complex Network, Data Visualization and Analysis, Computational Aesthetics, etc.

Since both sound and light are wave-like phenomena (by possessing the characteristics of wavelength), a research topic in both sound and light can be expanded to Vision technology and the Signal Processing in engineering. In fact, there have been emerging opinions about Vision Insight that machines could be more accurate than humans when looking into the essence. However, not only limited to the field of science but also in many other fields, an unrefined signal could open up various possibilities of perspectives in interpreting the nature of collections of data. For example, in Phaidon, Simmias mentions the attunement referring to the remaining sound even after the destruction of Lyre. This topic, involving the two different types of wavelength invites a wide range of researches on light and sound, Data Analysis, Data Visualization that would extract meaningful signals from noise, and harmonization.

Illuminatio : Enlightenment of A.I (Artificial Intelligence) & A.E (Artificial Emotion)

Knowing others is wisdom, knowing yourself is Enlightenment. – Laozi

※ Related Research Fields :
Perception, Cognition, Artificial Intelligence, Artificial Emotion, Impact of A.I on Society and Arts, Education, Media Art Education, Learning, STEAM

Eighteenth-century Europe embraced Enlightenment ideals in order to advance culture and civilization by the power of the human intellect and rationale. The influence of the Enlightenment movement in the society is similar to that of Artificial Intelligence(AI) which could happen in the near future-breaking down the old customs and discovering and spreading the universal truth through objective observation. AI has been a controversial topic because it is uncertain how SNN(Spiking Neural Network) that mimics the thinking process of human’s social and artistic brain activity will be able to solve problems. Even if SNN gains the problem-solving ability, various kinds of questions still remain. For example, SNN’s decision-making process and the purpose for solving problems is vague. This topic seeks a type of projects and researches that explores AI’s ability to configure human’s creativity and emotion. In addition, assuming the feasibility of Artificial Emotion (A.E), this topic invites works and research that deal with the essence of a man in the near future.
As the significance of redefining human creativity and ingenuity is emphasized with the advent of AI, ‘education’ in the regard of incubating the talents the contemporary society needs is also being highlighted. The role of education in the era of the machinery is not only restricted to nurturing the capability to stay abreast of the latest innovations and implement science and technology to the today’s everchanging turmoil of interests. There are active discussions on the education reflecting the transitions and transformations of the contemporary society from programming, code literacy, to STEAM, aiming to further present how the essence of humanity could be innovated. We await various researches and opinions on the importance and role of media art, focusing toward the direction of education for the present and the future.

Penumbra : In-between

Shadow is a color as light is, but less brilliant; light and shadow are only the relation of two tones. – Paul Cezanne

※ Related Research Fields :
Robotics, Altered Reality(VR/AR/MR), Interactive Art, Blockchain, etc.

We look for various topics for research that are not mentioned above. Light and shadow are relative concepts. A research that might be deemed a failure for some researchers could be seen as the process of the search for the truth from the perspective of another research field. The topics of the paper mentioned so far are the signposts for guidance and inspiration. However, beyond our narrow point of view, we would like to hear your very own stories. We hope to encounter works and research that are full of imagination and creativity, beyond our limited frame.