UPCOMING NSF/NEA WORKSHOP ON ART SCIENCE

I am attending this working shop and am interested in any inputs or thoughts you might have. roger malina


Re/Search: Art, Science, and Information Technology

A Joint Meeting of the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts

This workshop seeks to advance exploration at the intersection of art and science. Areas of particular interest include evolving forms of digital and electronic media, human‐centered computing, videogame design and technology, digitally‐mediated performing and visual arts and research that can lead to a better understanding of these fields.

The primary purpose of this discussion is to lay the foundation for articulating the types of inquiry that both lie at the intersection of concerns of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) as well as represent opportunities for advancing scientific knowledge and new forms of artistic research, output and engagement.

To accomplish these goals, we seek to create a new dialogue among influential thought leaders who can help guide us towards innovation and positive change. The workshop will include highly interactive working groups and brainstorming sessions around key topics and questions as:


• How can we identify innovative, and/or emerging practices being discovered at the intersection of art and science that are potentially transformative and/or deserving of governmental recognition and support?

• How can we explore and understand the impacts of creativity and critical interpretation theories on research and innovation in cognitive science, computer science, engineering, technology, art theory, and/or the social and behavioral sciences?

• Are there metrics we can use or design that can determine the value and impact of interdisciplinary collaborations between Computer & Information Science & Engineering related disciplines and disciplines that exist in the arts and humanities?

• Are there qualitative methods for critically interpreting and measuring the impact of technology‐rich creative endeavors that are resistant to established assessment oriented‐frameworks?

• What role can the arts play in developing strategies and finding creative solutions in environments where the arts do not traditionally come into play.

Goals & Objectives

• Fostering dialogue in support of interagency and inter‐institutional collaboration and resource opportunities.

• Identifying points of intersection between human‐centered computing, information‐technology research, digital media arts, creative disciplines and cognitive science.

• Developing a field impact report about the needs, approach and benefits of a sustainable platform for interdisciplinary research for the creative information technology field. We hope that you will be able to participate in this groundbreaking conversation and join us in this national effort to foster innovative collaboration among creative practitioners in the arts and sciences.

10 Comments

  1. amy found these abstracts of other funded art-science workshops or conferences funded=

    I will be one of the keynote speakers atthe Exploratorium
    described below

    roger

    Award Abstract #1057645
    Conference: Research at the Interface of the Life Sciences with the Arts, to be held in Washington, DC – December, 2010

    NSF Org: DBI
    Division of Biological Infrastructure
    Initial Amendment Date: August 12, 2010

    Program Manager: Sally E. O’Connor
    DBI Division of Biological Infrastructure
    BIO Directorate for Biological Sciences

    Start Date: August 15, 2010
    Awarded Amount to Date: $31390
    Investigator(s): Christopher Comer christopher.comer@umontana.edu (Principal Investigator)
    Ellen McCulloch-Lovell (Co-Principal Investigator)
    NSF Program(s):
    RESEARCH RESOURCES

    ABSTRACT

    This award provides funding to organize a conference on “Research at the Interface of the Life Sciences with the Arts.” The PIs will assemble a two-day conference to explore the potential for research and scholarly interaction of science (especially the life sciences) with the arts and the humanities. The conference will be held in Washington, D.C., with the expected co-sponsorship by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). The Conference will bring together approximately 25 participants, who will discuss the implications of their work, and/or form collaborations between and amongst themselves, in order to tackle problems in which both the scientific and the arts/humanities expertise are brought to bear on important public issues. Examples of potential discussion topics include how authors engage a person’s attentional circuitry and mimic memory; how dancers explore methods by which body movements can be used to demonstrate and investigate concepts of neurobiology, etc. This Conference will bring seemingly disparate disciplines together to find some commonalities and complementarities, in hopes of advancing both fields. Both biology and arts/humanities experts are expected to participate, with a focus on intellectual, and gender and ethnic, diversity. The PIs, one coming from neuroscience and the other from arts/humanities, will identify and select individuals to create the right balance in order to increase the likelihood for productive discussions. The PIs hope that stimulating dialogues would lead to a broader array of tools that both artists/humanists and scientists could use. A likely outcome of this discourse is the use of visual and performing arts and humanities in communicating science to the public. For more information, please contact Dr. Chris Comer at christopher.comer@umontana.edu, or Dr. Ellen McCulluch-Lovell at emlovell@marlboro.edu.
    Award Abstract #1002820
    Pilot: Qualitative Analysis of Creative Practices in Parallel IT and Art Projects

    NSF Org: IIS
    Division of Information & Intelligent Systems
    Initial Amendment Date: July 31, 2010

    Program Manager: Pamela L. Jennings
    IIS Division of Information & Intelligent Systems
    CSE Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering
    Start Date: August 1, 2010

    Awarded Amount to Date: $226495

    Investigator(s): Jay Bolter jay.bolter@lcc.gatech.edu (Principal Investigator)
    Juan Rogers (Co-Principal Investigator)

    NSF Program(s): CreativeIT

    ABSTRACT

    This project studies the creative practices of artists and computer scientists/engineers as they work independently to develop novel computing technologies. The goals are to use knowledge gained through this study to both inform computing research as well as to create and evaluate an educational framework for fostering innovation within computing, information science, and engineering (CISE) and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. At Georgia Institute of Technology, artists are contributing to the future of computing through the doctoral program in Digital Media. Some of these artists are developing novel computing technologies that parallel work being done in computer science and engineering labs at Georgia Tech. For example, a computer scientist who has developed a wearable sensor network for Navy soldiers is adapting his technology into a SIDS monitoring garment for infants. Separately, an artist is adapting technology she has used in an interactive sculpture to an infant swaddler for SIDS prevention. These common technologies and goals place their work in dialog, allowing direct comparison of creative work practices and outcomes. This project will study pairs of artists and computer scientists/engineers working independently on parallel computing projects to find similarities and differences in their creative work.

    This study will pose questions such as ?What common ground may be found between an artist?s and a computer scientist?s prototyping methods?? and ?How do artists and computer scientists incorporate or defy disciplinary training in their approach to innovation?? The study will establish a methodology and framework for understanding the mindsets and work approaches of creative practice in computing, engineering, and art and design. The knowledge resulting from this study will help researchers and educators in computer science, digital media, engineering, and the arts orchestrate creative projects in their own disciplines while incorporating knowledge and practices from other disciplines. In the second year, the study researchers will implement a course at Georgia Institute of Technology?s undergraduate Computational Media program that embodies knowledge gained about creativity across the disciplinary boundaries of art and computer science. This work in curriculum design will contribute in tangible ways to the NSF STEM initiative through publication of both the curriculum and classroom results.

    Award Abstract #0924379
    Doctoral Dissertation Research: Hannah Rogers: SymbioticA: The Practices of Art and Science

    NSF Org: SES
    Division of Social and Economic Sciences
    Initial Amendment Date: September 1, 2009

    Program Manager: Kelly A. Joyce
    SES Division of Social and Economic Sciences
    SBE Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences
    Start Date: September 15, 2009

    Awarded Amount to Date: $10797
    Investigator(s): Judith Reppy jvr2@cornell.edu (Principal Investigator)
    Hannah Rogers (Co-Principal Investigator)

    NSF Program(s): SCIENCE, TECH & SOCIETY

    ABSTRACT

    This doctoral dissertation research improvement grant–funded through the Biology & Society initiative between the Biological Sciences Directorate and the Science, Technology & Society (STS) Program at NSF–supports research that explores the question of how “art” and “science” work as categories that circumscribe bodies of knowledge. The research interrogates how knowledge communities label and materially shape artistic and scientific objects in various contexts. This research focuses on bioartists and how they understand and struggle with materials associated with biological knowledge production. Through their work, bioartists demonstrate and contest broader aesthetic, ethical, and political values. The members of the bioart movement use biological materials and laboratory techniques to create projects that critically question modern biology.

    This project conducts an ethnographic study at the artist-run biological research laboratory, SymbioticA, located at the University of Western Australia. SymbioticA actors position their activities according to a particular understanding of the art/science distinction. This investigation of bioart work can offer new ways to think about how the public can be engaged in scientific issues and the democratization of science through art.

    The research will also contribute to scholarship on how knowledge systems work by unpacking the categories of art and science. The project will show how social actors in different contexts rhetorically produce knowledge as either “art” or as “science.” The intellectual merit of this project is insight into the nature of specific critiques in the life sciences and contributions to current STS scholarship that analyzes concepts as categories. A broader impact of this research is that it investigates how art can inform and engage our understanding of science.

    PUBLICATIONS PRODUCED AS A RESULT OF THIS RESEARCH

    Rogers, Hannah Star. “Superhuman: Revolution of the Species,” Leonardo Reviews Online, v.January, 2010, p. n/a.
    Award Abstract #0905069
    Art As a Way of Knowing Conference: Artists at Work in Research and Science Education

    NSF Org: DRL
    Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings (DRL)

    Program Manager: Alphonse T. DeSena
    DRL Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings (DRL)
    EHR Directorate for Education & Human Resources
    Start Date: September 1, 2009
    Expires: August 31, 2011 (Estimated)

    Awarded Amount to Date: $249271

    Investigator(s): Peter Richards prichard@exploratorium.edu (Principal Investigator)
    Susan Schwartzenberg (Co-Principal Investigator)
    divider line

    ABSTRACT

    The Exploratorium is conducting a two-day conference in the fall of 2010 that will bring together professionals from science education, science research, arts practice, educational research, and museum exhibition and education. Organized around three key themes of history of art-science collaborations, program design, and research, the conference will bring together pioneers of art-science programming and innovators in exhibits, museum education, and educational research to consider the impact of arts on the theory and practices of engaged, interactive learning in science, technology, mathematics, and engineering. The attendees will also consider future directions for art-science-education interactions. Complementary deliverables are a conference Web site and publications, as well as extensive dissemination of results to the arts, science and education communities.
    Award Abstract #0824762
    NSF Workshop on Art, Creativity and Learning, to be held at the National Science Foundation and at the Philips Collection, Washington, D.C., June 11-13, 2008

    NSF Org: SBE
    Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences

    Program Manager: Soo-Siang Lim
    SBE Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences
    Start Date: May 1, 2008

    Awarded Amount to Date: $68757
    Investigator(s): Christopher Tyler cwt@ski.org (Principal Investigator)

    ABSTRACT

    Can learning to play the piano enhance your mathematical skills? Can exposure to great works of art enhance creativity and learning in engineering? People have often wondered about links between artistic training and education on the one hand, and ostensibly non-artistic cognitive abilities on the other hand. Early evidence suggests that education in the arts may facilitate creative thinking and effective problem solving across a broad range of intellectual domains. Neuroimaging studies reveal differences in the brains of artists vs. non-artists, which are stronger in those who started arts training early. Illuminating links between the arts and other intellectual domains, and the effects of artistic training on the brain, would both broaden and deepen our basic understanding of human learning.

    With support from the National Science Foundation, Dr. Christopher Tyler is organizing a workshop on art and creativity as they relate to the Science of Learning. A diverse group of scientists, educators, and historians will come together to discuss the effects of artistic training as a function of a variety of factors, including timing over the lifespan, artistic medium and modality, and emotional sequelae. A primary aim of these discussions is to explore new approaches to the enhancement of academic learning. The workshop will bring together distinguished researchers from a diverse array of interrelated fields, including visual art, music, dance, auditory pattern recognition, developmental psychology, neuroscience, education, and philosophy.

  2. From Stewart Dickson:

    Here are my impressions from my experience:

    http://www.nccs.gov/computing-resources/lens
    No one could say exactly *why* we needed a 35 megapixel display.
    With this system — 11,520 x 3,072 resolution on 30 feet by 8 feet
    — it is possible to view three orders of magnitude in scale
    simultaneously.
    Apart from the psychologically compelling immersion experience —
    how exactly does it advance the science being visualized? My experience
    was that we couldn’t answer this question. By far, the most popular
    application for viewing on the Everest display wall was the Terrabrowser:
    http://www.chimoosoft.com/products/terrabrowser
    It can fill up all 35 megapixels with the seamless USGS aerial
    photography mosaic.
    I put the NASA Blue Marble image at 8,000-pixel resolution onto an
    OpenGL sphere
    http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/BlueMarble
    It felt like looking out of a picture window from a spacecraft.

    I found one instance in which Art informed Science: at the Digital
    Human Meeting at the 11th Medicine Meets Virtual Reality conference
    (MMVR 11) the meeting organizer invited Andy Van Dam from Brown U
    <http://www.cs.brown.edu/%7Eavd&gt;., who invited his former graduate
    student, Scott E. Anderson <http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0027423&gt;, who
    presented the work he supervised for Sony Pictures "Hollowman
    <http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0164052/combined>&quot;.
    (Walt Hyneman’s presentation on the pre-production R&D,
    which he gave a year or two earlier at
    Walt Disney Feature Animation was actually much better.) The anatomical animation
    model served as an inspiration piece for what the scientists wanted to accomplish in their Digital Human projects. I was able to participate
    based upon my experience building anatomically-inspired character
    animation models for Disney’s

    Otherwise, ORNL’s component of the DARPA Virtual Soldier Project was
    sadly under-funded and did not receive Phase-II follow-up funding.
    http://www.virtualsoldier.us

    Visualization is viewed as an after-thought — it is lumped with Data
    Management and Visualization — it is the un-productive work which occurs after the *Big Iron* has run the
    *Important Code*. It is easy to fund the *Big Iron*.
    Graduate students will pay *you* to work for you. Post-Docs are just
    former graduate students.

  3. A contribution from Wilfred Niels Arnold:

    The Kansas City Section of the American Chemical Society is pleased to
    announce the addition of a ten minute, narrated, Powerpoint presentation
    to its website.  The program is made available for teaching, discussion
    and artistic interest at the interface of the sciences and the
    humanities.

    “Vincent van Gogh and the thujone connection” written and produced by Wilfred Niels Arnold

    webmaster: Dale DeWitt

    CTRL plus click:
    http://cas.umkc.edu/Chemistry/kcacs/Vincent%20van%20Gogh%20and%20the%20thujone%20connection/index.html

     to follow the link.

    The program will start automatically after 5 seconds on the title
    slide.
    “Full screen” View is recommended.

  4. Here is the attendee list for the NSF NEA workshop as of Aug
    Re/search: Art, Science, and Information Technology
    a joint meeting of the National Science Foundation
    Computer & Information Science & Engineering
    Division of Intelligent Information Systems
    and the National Endowment for the Arts

    September 15 & 16, 2010
    National Science Foundation Headquarters
    Arlington, Virginia

    WORKSHOP ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

    Laurie Durnell
    Director of Consulting and Graphics Facilitator
    The Grove Consultants International

    D. Fox Harrell, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Digital Media
    Comparative Media Studies Program | Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies
    Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL)
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Pamela L. Jennings, Ph.D.
    Program Director, CreativeIT and Human Centered Computing
    Computer & Information Science & Engineering Directorate
    Division of Intelligent Information Systems
    National Science Foundation

    Bill O’Brien
    Senior Advisor for Program Innovation
    National Endowment for the Arts

    Joan Shigekawa
    Senior Deputy Chairman
    National Endowment for the Arts

    Caralyn Spector
    Arts Policy Advisor
    National Endowment for the Arts

    Sneha Veeragoudar Harrell, Ph.D.
    Research Scientist
    TERC Education Research Collaborative

    Piotr Adamczyk
    Associate Analyst, Website Department
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    Jeffrey Bardzell, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor of HCI/Design and New Media
    School of Informatics and Computing
    Indiana University

    Jay David Bolter, Ph.D.
    Professor and Wesley Chair in New Media
    Co-Director, New Media Center
    School of Literature, Communication and Culture
    Georgia Institute of Technology

    Marjorie Blumenthal, Ph.D.
    Associate Provost, Academic
    Georgetown University

    Jonas Braasch, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Communication Acoustics and Aural Architecture Research Lab
    School of Architecture
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

    Shawn Brixey
    Professor and Floyd and Delores Jones Endowed Chair
    College of Arts and Sciences
    University of Washington

    Claudine Brown, J.D.
    Director of Education
    Smithsonian Institution

    Sheldon Brown
    Professor of Visual Arts
    Director, Center for Research in Computing & the Arts
    University of California, San Diego
    Founder, New Media Arts for the California Institute of Telecommunications and Information
    Technologies (CalIT2)

    Winslow Burleson, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor of Human Computer Interaction
    Arts, Media and Engineering Program and
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering
    Arizona State University

    Donna Cox, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Michael Aiken Endowed Chair Investiture and
    Director, Advanced Visualization Laboratory & eDream Institute
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    Amanda McDonald Crowley
    Executive Director
    Eyebeam Art and Technology Center

    Chris Csikszentmihalyi
    Director, Center for Future Civic Media
    Computing Culture, MIT Media Lab
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Jeremy Douglass, Ph.D.
    Postdoctoral Researcher
    Software Studies
    Center for Research in Computing in the Arts (CRCA)
    University of California, San Diego

    Elizabeth Daley, Ph.D.
    Dean, School of Cinematic Arts
    University of Southern California

    Jon Eisenberg, Ph.D.
    Director, Computer Science & Telecommunications Board
    The National Academies

    Sean Elwood
    Director, Grants and Services
    Creative Capital Foundation

    Sally Jo Fifer
    President & CEO
    Independent Television Service (ITVS)

    Gerhard Fischer, Ph.D.
    Director, Center for Lifelong Learning and Design
    Professor, Department of Computer Science
    University of Colorado, Boulder

    Tracy Fullerton
    Associate Professor, Interactive Media
    Director, Game Innovation Lab
    School of Cinematic Arts
    University of Southern California

    Alan Gershenfeld
    Founder & President
    E-Line Media

    Diane Gromala, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor and
    Canada Research Chair in Multidisciplinary and Media Arts
    School of Interactive Arts and Technology
    Simon Fraser University, Canada

    Mark Gross, Ph.D.
    Professor, Computational Design
    School of Architecture
    Carnegie Mellon University

    David Theo Goldberg, Ph.D.
    Director and Professor
    University of California Humanities Research Institute
    University of California, Irvine

    Ken Goldberg, Ph.D.
    Professor and Craigslist Distinguished Chair in New Media
    Professor of Engineering and Operations Research
    College of Engineering & School of Information
    Director, Berkeley Center for New Media
    University of California, Berkeley

    Tracy Hammond, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor, Computer Science & Engineering Department
    Director, Sketch Recognition Lab
    Texas A&M University

    Steve Harrison
    Associate Professor of Practice
    Department of Computer Science and School of Visual Arts
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    Tom Hewett, Ph.D.
    Professor of Psychology and Computer Science
    Department of Psychology
    Drexel University

    Adriene Jenik
    Professor and Director, School of Art
    Katherine K. Herberger Endowed Chair in Fine Arts
    Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts
    Arizona State University

    Natalie Jeremijenko
    Associate Professor of Visual Art
    xDesign Environmental Health Clinic
    New York University

    Jason Kelly Johnson
    Design Principal, Future Cities Lab
    Assistant Professor of Architecture & Design
    California College of the Arts

    Paul Kaiser
    New Media Artist
    OpenEnded Group

    Dennis Kratz, Ph.D.
    Dean, School of Arts & Humanities
    Ignacy and Celina Rockover Professor of Humanities
    University of Texas, Dallas

    JoAnn Kuchera-Morin, Ph.D.
    Director, Allosphere Research Laboratory
    California Nanosystems Institute

    Professor, Media Arts and Technology and Music
    Director, Center for Research in Electronic Art Technology
    University of California, Santa Barbara

    Joe Lewis
    Dean, Claire Trevor School of the Arts
    University of California, Irvine

    Chico MacMurtrie
    Artistic Director, Amorphic Robot Works

    Roger Malina, Ph.D.
    Director, Observatoire Astronomique of Marseille Provence and
    Executive Editor Leonardo Publications, MIT Press
    President of the Association Leonardo, Paris
    Board Member, Leonardo/International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology

    Fred G. Martin, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Computer Science
    University of Massachusetts, Lowell

    Michael Mateas, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Expressive Intelligence Studio
    Computer Science Department
    University of California, Santa Cruz

    Ali Mazalek, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Synaesthetic Media Lab
    Literature, Communication, and Culture / Graphics, Visualization, Usability Center
    Georgia Institute of Technology

    Nick Montfort, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Digital Media
    Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Gunalan Nadarajan
    Vice Provost for Research
    Maryland Institute College of Art

    Michael Naimark
    Research Associate Professor
    Interactive Media Division
    School of Cinematic Arts
    University of Southern California

    Simon Penny
    Professor of Arts and Engineering
    Claire Trevor School of Arts
    Henry Samueli School of Engineering
    Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Science
    University of California, Irvine

    Andrea Polli
    Mesa Del Sol Chair and Associate Professor of Digital Media
    Founding Director, Interdisciplinary Film and Digital Media Program
    Director, Arts Lab
    Department of Film and Media
    University of New Mexico

    Sabrina Raaf
    New Media Artist and Associate Professor
    School of Art & Design
    University of Illinois, Chicago

    Ben Rubin
    Media Artist, Ear Studio

    Orit Shaer, Ph.D.
    Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor of Computer Science
    Wellesley College

    Brian K. Smith, Ph.D.
    Dean, Continuing Education
    Rhode Island School of Design

    Atau Tanaka
    Professor and Chair, Digital Media
    Director of Culture Lab
    Newcastle University, U.K.

    Ron Wakkary, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    School of Interactive Arts and Technology
    Simon Fraser University

    Noah Wardrip-Fruin, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor, Computer Science
    Baskin School of Engineering
    University of California, Santa Cruz

    McKenzie Wark, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor, Chair of Culture and Media
    Associate Dean of Faculty Affairs
    Eugene Lang College
    The New School for Social Research

    Constance Yowell, Ph.D.
    Director of Education
    Program on Human and Community Development
    The MacArthur Foundation

    Andrew Zolli
    CEO, Z + Partners
    Curator and Executive Director, Pop!Tech

  5. Here is the attendee list for the NSF NEA workshop as of Aug

    Re/search: Art, Science, and Information Technology
    a joint meeting of the National Science Foundation
    Computer & Information Science & Engineering
    Division of Intelligent Information Systems
    and the National Endowment for the Arts

    September 15 & 16, 2010
    National Science Foundation Headquarters
    Arlington, Virginia

    WORKSHOP ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

    Laurie Durnell
    Director of Consulting and Graphics Facilitator
    The Grove Consultants International

    D. Fox Harrell, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Digital Media
    Comparative Media Studies Program | Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies
    Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL)
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Pamela L. Jennings, Ph.D.
    Program Director, CreativeIT and Human Centered Computing
    Computer & Information Science & Engineering Directorate
    Division of Intelligent Information Systems
    National Science Foundation

    Bill O’Brien
    Senior Advisor for Program Innovation
    National Endowment for the Arts

    Joan Shigekawa
    Senior Deputy Chairman
    National Endowment for the Arts

    Caralyn Spector
    Arts Policy Advisor
    National Endowment for the Arts

    Sneha Veeragoudar Harrell, Ph.D.
    Research Scientist
    TERC Education Research Collaborative

    Piotr Adamczyk
    Associate Analyst, Website Department
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art

    Jeffrey Bardzell, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor of HCI/Design and New Media
    School of Informatics and Computing
    Indiana University

    Jay David Bolter, Ph.D.
    Professor and Wesley Chair in New Media
    Co-Director, New Media Center
    School of Literature, Communication and Culture
    Georgia Institute of Technology

    Marjorie Blumenthal, Ph.D.
    Associate Provost, Academic
    Georgetown University

    Jonas Braasch, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Communication Acoustics and Aural Architecture Research Lab
    School of Architecture
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

    Shawn Brixey
    Professor and Floyd and Delores Jones Endowed Chair
    College of Arts and Sciences
    University of Washington

    Claudine Brown, J.D.
    Director of Education
    Smithsonian Institution

    Sheldon Brown
    Professor of Visual Arts
    Director, Center for Research in Computing & the Arts
    University of California, San Diego
    Founder, New Media Arts for the California Institute of Telecommunications and Information
    Technologies (CalIT2)

    Winslow Burleson, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor of Human Computer Interaction
    Arts, Media and Engineering Program and
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering
    Arizona State University

    Donna Cox, Ph.D.
    Professor
    Michael Aiken Endowed Chair Investiture and
    Director, Advanced Visualization Laboratory & eDream Institute
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    Amanda McDonald Crowley
    Executive Director
    Eyebeam Art and Technology Center

    Chris Csikszentmihalyi
    Director, Center for Future Civic Media
    Computing Culture, MIT Media Lab
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Jeremy Douglass, Ph.D.
    Postdoctoral Researcher
    Software Studies
    Center for Research in Computing in the Arts (CRCA)
    University of California, San Diego

    Elizabeth Daley, Ph.D.
    Dean, School of Cinematic Arts
    University of Southern California

    Jon Eisenberg, Ph.D.
    Director, Computer Science & Telecommunications Board
    The National Academies

    Sean Elwood
    Director, Grants and Services
    Creative Capital Foundation

    Sally Jo Fifer
    President & CEO
    Independent Television Service (ITVS)

    Gerhard Fischer, Ph.D.
    Director, Center for Lifelong Learning and Design
    Professor, Department of Computer Science
    University of Colorado, Boulder

    Tracy Fullerton
    Associate Professor, Interactive Media
    Director, Game Innovation Lab
    School of Cinematic Arts
    University of Southern California

    Alan Gershenfeld
    Founder & President
    E-Line Media

    Diane Gromala, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor and
    Canada Research Chair in Multidisciplinary and Media Arts
    School of Interactive Arts and Technology
    Simon Fraser University, Canada

    Mark Gross, Ph.D.
    Professor, Computational Design
    School of Architecture
    Carnegie Mellon University

    David Theo Goldberg, Ph.D.
    Director and Professor
    University of California Humanities Research Institute
    University of California, Irvine

    Ken Goldberg, Ph.D.
    Professor and Craigslist Distinguished Chair in New Media
    Professor of Engineering and Operations Research
    College of Engineering & School of Information
    Director, Berkeley Center for New Media
    University of California, Berkeley

    Tracy Hammond, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor, Computer Science & Engineering Department
    Director, Sketch Recognition Lab
    Texas A&M University

    Steve Harrison
    Associate Professor of Practice
    Department of Computer Science and School of Visual Arts
    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    Tom Hewett, Ph.D.
    Professor of Psychology and Computer Science
    Department of Psychology
    Drexel University

    Adriene Jenik
    Professor and Director, School of Art
    Katherine K. Herberger Endowed Chair in Fine Arts
    Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts
    Arizona State University

    Natalie Jeremijenko
    Associate Professor of Visual Art
    xDesign Environmental Health Clinic
    New York University

    Jason Kelly Johnson
    Design Principal, Future Cities Lab
    Assistant Professor of Architecture & Design
    California College of the Arts

    Paul Kaiser
    New Media Artist
    OpenEnded Group

    Dennis Kratz, Ph.D.
    Dean, School of Arts & Humanities
    Ignacy and Celina Rockover Professor of Humanities
    University of Texas, Dallas

    JoAnn Kuchera-Morin, Ph.D.
    Director, Allosphere Research Laboratory
    California Nanosystems Institute

    Professor, Media Arts and Technology and Music
    Director, Center for Research in Electronic Art Technology
    University of California, Santa Barbara

    Joe Lewis
    Dean, Claire Trevor School of the Arts
    University of California, Irvine

    Chico MacMurtrie
    Artistic Director, Amorphic Robot Works

    Roger Malina, Ph.D.
    Director, Observatoire Astronomique of Marseille Provence and
    Executive Editor Leonardo Publications, MIT Press
    President of the Association Leonardo, Paris
    Board Member, Leonardo/International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology

    Fred G. Martin, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Computer Science
    University of Massachusetts, Lowell

    Michael Mateas, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Expressive Intelligence Studio
    Computer Science Department
    University of California, Santa Cruz

    Ali Mazalek, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Synaesthetic Media Lab
    Literature, Communication, and Culture / Graphics, Visualization, Usability Center
    Georgia Institute of Technology

    Nick Montfort, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Digital Media
    Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Gunalan Nadarajan
    Vice Provost for Research
    Maryland Institute College of Art

    Michael Naimark
    Research Associate Professor
    Interactive Media Division
    School of Cinematic Arts
    University of Southern California

    Simon Penny
    Professor of Arts and Engineering
    Claire Trevor School of Arts
    Henry Samueli School of Engineering
    Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Science
    University of California, Irvine

    Andrea Polli
    Mesa Del Sol Chair and Associate Professor of Digital Media
    Founding Director, Interdisciplinary Film and Digital Media Program
    Director, Arts Lab
    Department of Film and Media
    University of New Mexico

    Sabrina Raaf
    New Media Artist and Associate Professor
    School of Art & Design
    University of Illinois, Chicago

    Ben Rubin
    Media Artist, Ear Studio

    Orit Shaer, Ph.D.
    Clare Boothe Luce Assistant Professor of Computer Science
    Wellesley College

    Brian K. Smith, Ph.D.
    Dean, Continuing Education
    Rhode Island School of Design

    Atau Tanaka
    Professor and Chair, Digital Media
    Director of Culture Lab
    Newcastle University, U.K.

    Ron Wakkary, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    School of Interactive Arts and Technology
    Simon Fraser University

    Noah Wardrip-Fruin, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor, Computer Science
    Baskin School of Engineering
    University of California, Santa Cruz

    McKenzie Wark, Ph.D.
    Associate Professor, Chair of Culture and Media
    Associate Dean of Faculty Affairs
    Eugene Lang College
    The New School for Social Research

    Constance Yowell, Ph.D.
    Director of Education
    Program on Human and Community Development
    The MacArthur Foundation

    Andrew Zolli
    CEO, Z + Partners
    Curator and Executive Director, Pop!Tech

  6. sharada srinivasan to roger
    show details Aug 26 (1 day ago)
    ..OK fine, thats cool..

    (

    but that brings me to the fact that,(moving entitely outside the realm of the specific concerns etc of your conference and just talking in general) there is the larger point that the scientific enterprise/s need to also engage more with the idea of funding the arts or humanities without asking too searchingly how will it benefit science in a very tangible way, but taking a broader or longer term view of looking at the intangible benefits.

    I say this because for eg as a case study we are now putting in this major proposal for a centre for heritage science, but since our work has a major aspect of materials science applied to heritage it needs to be housed with good access to a science-based institution and needs support from organisations which fund science or are scientific organisations, but we often get asked the question by the scientific bodies that how does this activity actually benefit science, ie implying that if it could concretely benefit science it would be more worthy of funding.

    which is difficult to pinpoint becuase obviously the more obvious benefits are towards lets say historical understanding, conservation, cultural anthropology etc. but its harder to concretely say the benefits to science are that so and so compound that can’t be easily studied in modern materials science is found in some archaeological material and hence these things add to our scientific knowledge, and maybe its also the case that within my own discipline for example one hasnt tried too much to sit down and quantify the actual benefits to science which are probably there in a tangible sense (maybe one ought to try to do that too..).

    But at the same time the scientific bodies need to have the larger vision so to speak about the benefits to science which are undeniably there, for example in an educational sense and other ways. (for eg experimental or scientific archaeology or craft-based ethnotechnological studies can be a great way to get students interested in materials etc.), usefulness for debates on science communication, inclucating a basic sense of aesthetic and the related intangible benefits of that whatever those are and so on..

    (By the way since i mentioned it, iam happy to say we have made headway with this idea of a centre and more by and by)

    best

    Sharada

  7. Linda= a number of neurobiologists have books out that look at these kinds of issues= including Semir Zeki, Jean Pierre Changeux and V S Ramachandran- in Ramachandran’s “phantoms in the brain” book there is an interesting speculative section on how the brain establishes ‘stable’ interpretations from the large flux of sensory data= and how as a result one can talk of ‘belief’ systems being encoded = and how the brain deals with discordant inputs or one assumes new ideas that are in conflict with the established interpretations of the world the brain maintains.The music and the brain books also at some length look at how musical training results in modification of brain structure. Ernest Edmonds has a number of articles looking at how artists use tools=but I dont think these have been coupled with neurobiological studies. There is a very large literature out there on creativity= not a topic i am expert in=maybe someone else on this discussion knows of specific studies.

    One of the arguments for scientific studies in art-science are indeed to help understand the creative process= but the creative process is presumably not so different in business or social activitism- so one general argument on scientific study of creativity in art-science, is artists as subjects

    Roger Malina

  8. from cynthia panucci

    To: Art & Science Collaborations
    Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 3:54 PM
    Subject: Re: ASCI > Exemplars & Thoughts re: DC workshop

    cynthia

    THANKS for all the inputs which i will start incorporating and
    cite you as a contributor

    not sure your email was written in a form where i can make
    it public on the blog ? if you authorise me to post it on the
    blog i will

    otherwise will incorporte into the various streams

    roger

    On Sun, Aug 29, 2010 at 6:35 PM, Art & Science Collaborations
    wrote:
    > Hi Roger ~

    >
    > CONCEPTUALLY… if you put any of the stellar creative arts minds [in IT,
    > computer science, new media from the attendee list] to the task of
    > collaborating with scientists on their research projects, the research
    > results will most likely be: more humanistic, holistic, conceptually and
    > texturally richer, would consider the societal consequences, discover
    > more freely-conjured applications, and bottom-line… the research results
    > would be delivered to the public in more engaging, yet informative ways.
    >
    > However, as we know, collaboration is difficult across disciplines [like a
    > marriage is] and the scientist has to respect what the artist could bring to
    > the research project, and the artist should be inspired by the topic.
    >
    > Indeed, if the mandate of NSF is to bring the results of science research to
    > the public so that they are better informed citizens prepared to vote on
    > today’s pressing science issues that directly affect them: stem-cell
    > research, bio-engineering, green energy, greenhouse effects, natural
    > resource sustainabilty and equity… then the answer is simple. The NSF has
    > failed miserably in this area.
    >
    > The US public, including government officials, don’t seem to understand
    > science nor trust science research results. The “lack of will” and action
    > towards solving today’s pressing environmental issues is a prime example. A
    > scientifically un-educated public has allowed the climate change debate to
    > become a “smoke-screen” detour that has side-tracked the real issue
    > of accepting the serious and unequivocable physical effects of “global
    > warming” and putting money [and jobs] into creating solutions for how to
    > turn it around.
    >
    > I believe the Wellcome Trust’s 20-year history of bringing medical science
    > issues and discoveries to the public through theatre, art exhibitions,
    > public art, and art-sci collaborations is an excellent exemplar of how to
    > engage and inform the public. However, if one is required to
    > utilize evaluative measurement tools for “proof positive” of the
    > contribution that Wellcome’s art-science projects made to furthering medical
    > research or creating new tools or applications… that’s an entire research
    > project in itself.
    >
    > Bell Labs back in the mid-1960’s is perhaps a better example of how the
    > mingling of minds of artists and scientists [after-hours, after mid-night],
    > was an “un-official” incubator of important “future” applications of
    > communications technology. They called it the “picture phone” and it of
    > course could not come to fruition until the size and speed of
    > microprocessors, compression and fiber optic technologies were born. ASCI
    > did a symposium with the EAT artists and technologists called: “Bell Labs &
    > the Origins of the Multimedia Artist” at Cooper Union in NYC [1998].
    > http://www.asci.org/BellLabs/index.html I am surprised that these people who
    > participated in this excellent art-tech historical model were not invited to
    > the D.C. Workshop: Ken Knowlton – one of the early developers of computer
    > motion pictures [lives in NJ]; Max Mathews – often referred to as the
    > “father of computer music” [lives in CA]; A. Michael Noll – one of the first
    > pioneers of digital art and virtual reality [lives in NJ]; Laurie Spiegel –
    > composer/visual artist who did extensive creative work at the Labs
    >
    > Mike Noll especially, since he went on to become a distinguished professor
    > and 4-years interim Dean at the Annenberg School of Communications at USC,
    > taught IT at NYU and Columbia Univ. and has authored text books on
    > telecommunications, and during his 15-years of research at Bell Labs,
    > received six patents for his inventions in speech processing and
    > human-machine tactile communications. Only recently has his pioneering work
    > [1960’s] in the use of digital computers in the visual arts been
    > acknowledged around the world. http://noll.uscannenberg.org
    > amnoll@yahoo.com; phone: 908-647-3294
    >
    > EXEMPLARS:
    >
    > ~ The collaborative work of Ken Rinaldo immediately comes to mind,
    > especially since we’ll launch his remarkable work with robotics, biology,
    > and humans on Sept.1st as an ASCI Featured Member:
    > http://www.asci.org/artikel1116.html His robotic work may have provided new
    > engineering applications.
    >
    > ~ Heather Ackroyd/Dan Harvey [artist/ photographer] collaborating
    > with professors Howard Thomas and Dr. Helen Ougham [plant biologists]. “The
    > application of this type of grass in the artist’s work has significantly
    > retained the visibility of their art images and in response to their
    > collaboration, the scientists have developed methods for non-invasive
    > analysis of events going on in the cells of senescing leaf tissue, through
    > the use of hyper-spectral imaging technology [that the artists suggested].
    > http://www.asci.org/ArtSci2001/index.html
    > ~ Artist, Nina Sobell, was an early video pioneer, then was one of the first
    > use the WWW for live performance [projects at NYU], and since 2000, has been
    > collaborating with scientists and technologists to explore the intricacies
    > of personal communication by interpretation and navigation of your brainwave
    > energy. http://ninasobell.com/london/index.htm
    > I don’t know what the practical applications are, but I intuit that with
    > proper NSF funding, they would evolve [like the early Bell Labs
    > ideas]. History of her Brainwave work: http://ninasobell.com/index_menu.html
    >
    > ~ My own personal experience re: creating new applications of technolgy via
    > art-driven research…
    > Back in 1997, I was researching how to utilize fiber-optic, side-emmitting
    > tubing to create night-time lighting effects [blinking off/on to mimic a
    > “lightning bug”] for an 8′-long, plexiglass, aquatic “Water-Strider”
    > sculpture that I had built. The industry standard metal halide lightsource
    > was so “hot” that it requires a fan to cool the area where its focused
    > beam almost meets the end of the plastic fiber-optic tubes so they don’t
    > melt. My sculpture had a photo-voltaic planel as it’s energy source and
    > marine battery to store the electricity. The fan/metal halide system would
    > require too much of that energy. However, since my aesthetic goal was to
    > have the light source be intermittant… that naturally led me to using a
    > solar-powered strobe light [designed for airports] instead. When I went to
    > meet the lighting engineers working at the Connecticut airport’s lab, I
    > brought along a 1/4″, side-emitting, fiber-optic tube [the lighting-effect
    > is like neon but it is bendable into shapes] to test with their stobe light.
    > The engineers were amazed because they had never seen side-emmiting
    > fiber-optic tubes! And, when I called the fiber-optic company in California,
    > they donated the tubing because they had never had someone use a strobe
    > light with their tubing! [new application]
    > http://www.asci.org/news/featured/pannucci/wsvid.html
    >
    > Now I see the item below via a Google search…
    > Intermittant Renewables + Energy Storage = Base Load Power
    > Aug 12, 2010 … Power grid-scale mass storage of electricity from
    > intermittent renewable energy, such as wind or solar energy, is in its
    > infancy. http://www.green-energy-news.com/arch/nrgs2010/20100052.html
    >
    > All I know for a fact is… that some artists, when driven with
    > inspiration to accomplish the vision “in their mind’s eye,” are tennacious
    > researchers by nature, utilize the experimental method by necessity to
    > improvise, and innovation is a normal part of their methodology/ creative
    > process.
    >
    > I once read in an issue of Popular Science magazine [I think?] about a woman
    > artist working in clay for 20-years who had concockted a clay mixture that
    > was both extremely light-weight and strong… in order to build a tall
    > sculpture. Well as it turns-out, the airplane industry was interested in her
    > “new material” to use for airplanes, as it seems it was virtually
    > “non-flammable”!
    >
    > I couldn’t find her name via Google search but did find: Nanotechnology in
    > Aerospace PDF/Adobe Acrobat – Quick View
    > Chapter 3: Review of state of the art of technology and future trends in.
    > Aeronautics. ….. functional applications in the aerospace industry. ….
    > The special properties of clay-polymer nanocomposites expand the use of
    > http://www.nanoforum.org/…/Nanotechnology%20in%20Aerospace.pdf?
    >
    > It would be unfortunate if the NSF doesn’t decide to invest some of its vast
    > resources in art-science research projects just because there might not be
    > “proof-positive” of the practical results of such endeavors. At least a
    > 5-year experiment to see what the potentialites are when “real money” is
    > present.
    >
    > I know I said that I didn’t have the time to keystroke, but you got me
    > going! and this is something I’ve thought a lot about and supported with my
    > time and energy over these past 20+ years.
    >
    > Good luck in DC!
    > Cynthia/ASCI

  9. Colleagues

    There is now a blog discussion going on the US National Endowment forthe Arts (nea) WEB SITE = as a folllow up to the joint workshop between the US nationalscience foundation and the nea= join the discussion to help us convince thesefunding agencies to fund art science collaboration in the US !

    roger malina

    Alt.Art-Sci: We Need New Ways of Linking Arts and Sciences

    http://www.arts.gov/artworks/?p=4093

    A recent National Science Foundation (NSF)-National Endowment for the Arts workshop sought to re-think the ways that the arts and sciences are being linked today and how the agencies might jointly promote new emerging areas of research and cultural development. Participants included artists, scientists, and research engineers, but also university deans and directors of alternative art-science spaces. This first workshop focused on computer science and information technology; a forthcoming NSF-NEA workshop will look at the arts and the biological sciences. Next year the NSF Informal Education Division is sponsoring an art-science workshop “Art as a Way of Knowing” at the San Francisco Exploratorium, one of the pioneering institutions that has coupled creative artists with scientists and engineers for more than forty years.

    So why this new attention to the coupling of the arts and sciences? The topic has been hotly debated for several hundred years at least, ever science the scientific revolution led to separate science institutions decoupled from the arts and humanities. The 19th century saw prominent figures such as Goethe active in both the arts and sciences. Samuel Morse, the inventor of the Morse code, was a painter. In the 1920s and 1930s the Bauhaus movement recoupled the creative arts with science and industry. In the 1950s C.P. Snow’s “two cultures” debate rekindled initiatives to bridge the arts and sciences. In the 1960s, Experiments in Art and Technology led to the coupling of artists such as Rauschenberg with engineers such as Billy Kluver. So what’s new?

    At Home on the Range, the “Digital” Range

    The first thing is that the ‘born digital’ generation artists find themselves at home in the landscape of information technologies. The NSF Creative IT program recognized this burgeoning area of research. The NEA’s Audience 2.0 How Technology Influences Arts Participation highlighted the new ways, and growing audiences, for art that is being created and distributed through the digital electronic media. The born digital generation is innovating new ways of personal expression within the information technologies landscape; it has become second nature for artists of all types to use computers and to push the development of computers in new directions to address artistic needs. New “creative” and entertainment industries have resulted.

    Art-Science Creativity by Whom?

    Perhaps ironically, creativity was almost a dirty word by the end of the NSF-NEA workshop because it is overused and often not clearly defined. Creativity by whom and for what? What was clear was that there is a new dynamic and rapidly evolving group of artists, scientists, and engineers working together, a networked “community of practice” that also comes together through a variety of “communities of interest.” Most of these creative individuals or teams work in informal settings from nonprofit groups to the hacker, “make”, community and alternative arts centers, and citizens and peoples science movements. An important issue is how to network and cross feed these hacker, “make,” and community groups with the more formal institutional programs in universities, and art and design schools.

    Art-Science Creativity for What?

    “Creativity for What” was another leitmotif reflecting a concern that technology-driven innovation needs to be contextualized first by social and cultural needs, with examples from community-based organizations faced with urban renewal, societal issues such as climate change and energy sustainability, or the technological transformation of health issues. Our Town,the proposed NEA program for the arts and urban redevelopment perhaps provides one example context that could motivate new art-science agendas. There are many burning issues in our lives and communities that give us no choice but to link the arts and sciences. Art-Science Creativity: Innovation in Innovation Another thread was the idea that we need to innovate in creativity thinking itself. We need to innovate in innovation when faced with the big data flood, distributed networked knowledge, and the impact of digital culture on how the arts and sciences are embedded in society. The recent Macarthur report on Learning Institutions in the Digital Age as well as the National Research Council’s Beyond Productivity: Information Technology, Innovation, and Creativity report provide good starting points. As we evolve toward networked culture and knowledge, the ‘partitions and divisions’ within funding institutions and universities seem mal-adapted to the rapidly changing locus of multi-, inter-, and trans-disciplinary artistic practice, and more particularly the rapidly changing landscape of art-science collaboration.

    ALT.ART-SCI

    The phrase “Alt-Art-Sci” emerged a number of times during the discussions as a way of capturing the sense of unease that “business as usual” approaches will miss the mark. We need to “innovate in innovation” and find other approaches to work in the new emerging networked culture. We need to look at where the most exciting creativity is occurring, and we need to look at the burning issues in our communities and how harnessing new couplings of science, engineering, and cultural approaches can be part of creating a sustainable society.

    http://www.arts.gov/artworks/?p=4093

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