C.P.SNOW PROVED WRONG MALINA SAYS

PRESS RELEASE

For Immediate Release: March 27, 2014

Director, CONTACT: Margot H. Knight, Executive Djerassi Resident Artists Program margot@djerassi.org | 650-­‐747-­‐1250 (office) | 407-­‐963-­‐5309 (cell)

Residents for Scientific Delirium Madness Announced Washington DC

— LEONARDO, The International Society for Arts, Sciences and Technology and the Djerassi Resident Artists Program announced the selection of 13 scientists and artists (names & biographies are posted at the end of this announcement) for a residential retreat July 1-­‐31, 2014 at the Djerassi Resident Artists Program in Woodside, CA.

Dubbed Scientific Delirium Madness, the retreat will connect some of the world’s most distinguished scientists with some of the world’s most forward-­‐thinking artists selected from over 225 applicants and nominees. During the course of the residency, choreographers, composers, writers and visual artists will work closely with physicists, biologists and industrial engineers to explore and transform the boundaries of art and science.

http://djerassi.org/scientific-delirium-madness.html

http://leonardo.info/whatsnew.html

The announcement was made at the DC Art & Science Evening Rendezvous (DASER) organized by the Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences (CPNAS). J.D. Talasek, CPNAS Director noted, “We have reached a point of critical mass. Given our time of deep knowledge and ever evolving networks of communication, it seems ridiculous and irresponsible to not create spaces where the disciplines can converse and inform one another. The residency addresses this timely need.”

“New generations of artists, scientists and engineers are proving C.P. Snow wrong. There are no longer two cultures,” said Roger Malina, past chair of Leonardo and a member of the project’s steering committee. “Leonardo/ISAST is delighted to team with the Djerassi Program for these art-­‐ science residencies: they will provide time and space for the residents to work outside their home discipline as ‘hybrids’ and stimulate trans-­‐disciplinary collaboration.

The project is a tribute to Carl Djerassi, the co-­‐founder of the Djerassi Program and the late Frank Malina, founder of the Leonardo Journal. Djerassi and Malina enjoyed shared success both in the sciences and in the arts.”

In addition to collegial time, the retreat will include a regular series of blogs, LASERs (Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous) events organized by noted cultural historian Piero Scaruffi, an Open House/Open Studio public gathering at the Djerassi Program, a white paper by journalist and writer Jamie Diamond and a special insert in the LEONARDO journal. “An art/science residency is in our organizational DNA,” noted Margot H. Knight, Executive Director of the Djerassi Program. “Our founder, biochemist Carl Djerassi has an active arts practice as a writer and playwright. Our Silicon Valley location reminds us constantly of the robust interplay between art and science and technology.”

The residency is supported by LEONARDO and Djerassi Resident Artists Program donors and an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The Partners

Recognized as one of the world’s most prestigious artist residencies, the Djerassi Resident Artists Program has accelerated the creative process of more than 2200 residents since its founding in 1979. Perfectly suited to grant creative thinkers freedom for intense work, the facility sits on an isolated 583-­‐acre ranch amidst native redwood and oak forests, rolling grasslands, and broad Pacific Ocean vistas. Residents connect with and use the inspirational grounds—for hiking, installation and performance areas, and for gathering artist materials. Its mission is to nurture creativity and provide space and uninterrupted time for arts and to protect, preserve and restore— in perpetuity—the natural habitat upon which it sits.

Leonardo/The International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology creates opportunities for the powerful exchange of ideas between practitioners in art, science and technology. Through publications, initiatives and public forums, Leonardo facilitates cross-­‐ disciplinary research, seeking to catalyze fruitful solutions for the challenges of the 21st century. By enhancing communication among scientists, artists and engineers, Leonardo supports experimental projects and interacts with established institutions of art and science to transform their practices. It has served as a critical content provider in the field of Art/Science through its Publications Program since 1968, currently in partnership with the MIT Press. Through its Engagement Programs, Leonardo has a rich history of collaborative activities and events with like-­‐minded organizations and institutions around the world. Leonardo’s popular LASER (Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous) lecture/networking gatherings spotlight art and science practitioners and thinkers

The LASER (Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous) series is a national program of evening gatherings that bring artists and scientists together for informal presentations and conversation with an audience. The series was started by cultural historian Piero Scaruffi in January 2008. The Bay Area LASERs now alternate between San Francisco (at USF), Silicon Valley (at Stanford University) and the East Bay (at UC Berkeley), and sister series were started in 2010 in Washington DC at the National Academy of Sciences, 2013 in Los Angeles at UCLA, in Santa Cruz UC Santa Cruz, and in Davis at UC Davis, and 2014 in London at the University of Westminster, and in Austin, TX at the Umlauf Museum. ###

Djerassi Resident Artists Program

LEONARDO, The International Society for the Arts, Sciences & Technology

Artists’ & Scientists’ Bios – Scientific Delirium Madness

July 1 – July 30, 2014

 

 

Sasha Petrenko, Richmond, CA. Media Artist.

Petrenko received her BA in Art Practice from the University of California, Berkeley and her MFA from Mills College in Oakland, CA. She is an adjunct professor at the University of San Francisco and Diablo Valley College where she teaches drawing and sculpture. Her work has been exhibited at numerous galleries and institutions including Robert Wilson’s Watermill Center for Performance, New York, Bay Area Now 4 at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, Headlands Center for the Arts where she was an artist-in-residence, San Jose Museum of Art, Southern Exposure and Kala Art Institute where she was awarded a fellowship and artist residency. Her work has been reviewed in ArtForum.com, the San Francisco Chronicle, The SF Weekly, KALW Radio, ReadyMade.com, and Art in America.

 

Meredith Tromble, Oakland, CA. Media Artist

Tromble is an artist and writer whose areas of interest include creative process and interdisciplinary research. She is the author of “Art & Shadows”, a series of essays on contemporary in light of contemporary research, funded by the Art Writers Grant Program of the Andy Warhol Foundation. Her installation works have been exhibited in California at Southern Exposure, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, and the Mills and Rosicrucian Museums; and lecture/performances have been presented at the Tate Britain, the University of Provence, and Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. Sumner was an artist commentator for KQED-FM in San Francisco, for the program that became Sedge Thomson’s West Coast Live. She has authored hundreds of interviews, essays and commentaries for print and digital publications including Artweek, Aspect, and Leonardo and edited a book on the new media artist Lynn Hershman published by the University of California Press. In addition to her work as an Associate Professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Studies at the San Francisco Art Institute, she is currently collaborating with Dawn Sumner of the University of California, Davis on a virtual installation, Take Me Me To Your Dream (Dream Vortex) and the “Madame Entropy” series of lecture/performances.

 

Donna Sternberg, Santa Monica, CA. Choreographer

Donna Sternberg has professionally premiered over 75 works, presented performances, educational programs and taught throughout the U.S., Canada and Mexico.  After dancing in and directing several dance companies, she founded Donna Sternberg & Dancers in 1985 and has collaborated with artists and scientists from a variety of backgrounds.  In 2013 Sternberg was awarded a choreographic fellowship from the Santa Monica Cultural Affairs Dept.   She has been commissioned to create works for numerous organizations such as the California Science Center, SIGGRAPH, Skirball Museum, Dance Moving Forward Festival and California Choreographer’s Festival.  Her work has been presented in theaters, site-specific locations and alternative venues including UCLA, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Laguna Beach Museum of Art, Edythe Broad Stage, UC Irvine, Annenberg Beach House, Rancho La Puerta in Mexico and ODC San Francisco. She has participated in adjudicated dance festivals throughout California such as Dance Kaleidoscope, So Cal Invitational, Festival of Solos, Summerfest, and at the Los Angeles County Art Museum.  Her work has received support from the California Arts Council, California Council for the Humanities, National Performance Network, Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department, Santa Monica Cultural Affairs Department, Culver City Cultural Affairs Commission, Los Angeles County Arts Commission, National/State/County Partnership, Pacific Bell, Bank of America and the Amgen Foundation.  For the past 10 years science has served as an inspiration to create evening-length works on themes such as quantum physics, quantum entanglement, perception and memory, the environment, celestial mechanics and plant biology.  Her work and dance company have been featured in print (Dance Magazine, Dance Spirit, Los Angeles Times), radio and television (PBS, City TV) She has been a guest artist at the University of Washington, UC San Diego, Cal State LA, Reed College and the CA Dance Educators Assoc. as well as an artist-in-residence in Costa Rica and Mexico.

 

Ari Frankel, New York, NY. Composer

Frankel writes, composes and produces operas, chamber and electroacoustic works, dance/theater scores, studio recordings, streams, and site-specific installations. His explorations have included The Tibetan Book Of The Dead, T.S. Eliot, Anne Sexton, Primo Levi, Shakespeare, Samuel Beckett, Francis Bacon and Ezra Pound. Collaborators have included Muna Tseng, LaMama, The Actors Studio, The Atlantic Theater, John Kelly, Fiona Shaw, Tai Dang, Rina Schenfeld, William H. Macy, and Andreas Scholl. Frankel has also worked in film, television and sound design. His Neverland work with Suzanne Ciani was nominated for a Grammy award. He has written and taught an Audio for New Media course at Emerson College and Advanced Interactive Sound at Northeastern University. The New York Times described his Head Games as a “haunting collage of sounds, original and popular music”. The Glasgow Herald felt “true passion” in Spirit Ruins and The London Times marveled at “light seeming materials build[ing] an overwhelming effect”. The Village Voice explained SHATTERED, hymns for mortal creatures’ “emotionally charged original music” as “wonderfully poignant and plangent.” www.arifrankel.com

 

Charlotte Jacobs, M.D., Stanford, CA. Writer.

Jacobs is a Professor of Medicine (Emerita) at Stanford University where she has served as Senior Associate Dean and as Director of the Clinical Cancer Center. Her numerous academic honors include an endowed professorship, Phi Beta Kappa, and the Distinguished Alumni Award from Washington University.  Ninety scientific articles and three books reflect her medical research. Mid-career, Jacobs began studying biography writing. She has been awarded writing residencies at Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, MacDowell Colony, and Ragdale Foundation. Her first biography, Henry Kaplan and the Story of Hodgkin’s Disease, was published by Stanford General Press in March of 2010; the paperback was released in 2012. The Wall Street Journal named Jacobs’ biography one of the “Five Best Books on doctors’ lives.” The San Francisco Chronicle called it an “exquisite, compelling biography of the man who helped make Hodgkin’s disease a curable condition.” She is currently writing Jonas Salk’s biography-Jonas  Salk: American Icon, Scientific Outcast-and is under contract with Oxford University Press.

 

Pireeni Sundaralingam, San Francisco, CA. (UK) Poet

Pireeni Sundaralingam, a cognitive scientist, poet, and playwright, explores the cognitive and neural bases of visual perception and the role of metaphor in reconfiguring what we perceive in the world around us. Dedicated to examining the confluence of science and art, Sundaralingam has held national fellowships both in cognitive science and in poetry. Educated at Oxford, she has held research posts at Cornell, UCLA, and MIT. Her poetry has been published in journals such as Ploughshares and The Progressive and anthologies by W.W.Norton, Prentice Hall, and Macmillan, and has also been featured on national radio in the United States, England, and Sweden. Pireeni has spoken on the intersections between poetry and the brain at MOMA (New York), the Exploratorium (San Francisco), and the Life in Space symposium at Studio Olafur Eliasson (Berlin). She recently guest-edited a special issue of World Literature Today on the “Crosstalk between Science & Literature.” Pireeni is currently Associate Professor at the CIIS where she is enjoying creating MFA poetry courses that explore the cross-section between poetry and science.

 

Devavani Chatterjea, Saint Paul, MN. Biologist

Chatterjea is an immunologist who studies the development of T cells, stromal cell signaling in the bone marrow and the roles of mast cells in the initiation of inflammatory pain. She has previously worked on developing models of bone marrow transplantation and bacterial infection in mice as well as in therapeutic drug development for autoimmune diseases in the research immunology division of Genentech, Inc. Chatterjea is the associate director of Macalester’s Program in Community and Global Health and is particularly interested in the development of curricula and programs that bring public health education into the context of undergraduate liberal learning. She likes to explore the use and application of immunological metaphors and frameworks of thought to issues of socio-cultural identity. Chatterjea teaches Cell Biology, one of the courses in the Department’s core sequence, as well as courses in immunology and public health. Her recent work includes collaborative explorations in poetry, performance based ways to communicate her scientific interests. Chatterjea was recently awarded a $30K two-year grant from the National Vulvodynia Association to extend Chatterjea’s mast cell-pain studies into a vulvar pain model in mice. She received her BA from Holyoke College, and her PhD from Stanford University.

 

Jim Crutchfield, Davis, CA. Physicist  Crutchfield teaches nonlinear physics at the University of California, Davis, directs its Complexity Sciences Center, and promotes science interventions in nonscientific settings. He’s mostly concerned with what patterns are, how they are created, and how intelligent beings discover them; see http://csc.ucdavis.edu/∼chaos.Crutchfield received his BA summa cum laude in Physics and Mathematics and his PhD in Physics from the University of California, Santa Cruz. Over the last three decades Crutchfield has worked in the areas of nonlinear dynamics, solid- state physics, astrophysics, fluid mechanics, critical phenomena and phase transitions, chaos, and pattern formation. His current research interests center on computational mechanics, the physics of complexity, statistical inference for nonlinear processes, genetic algorithms, evolutionary theory, machine learning, quantum dynamics, and distributed intelligence.

 

Curtis Frank, Stanford, CA. Chemical Engineer
Frank is Sr. Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Materials Science and Engineering and of Chemistry; Polymer Physics and Molecular Assemblies, Stanford University, Stanford, CA. He received his BA with High Distinction in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota; and his MS in Chemical Engineering, and his PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana, IL.  Frank is the 1990 Winner of the C.M.A. Stine Award of the Division of Materials Science and Engineering of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers; and 1993 Chairman of Division of Polymer Chemistry of the American Chemical Society. He is on the Editorial Boards of Polymer and Polymers for Advanced Technologies. Frank explores the molecular structure of high polymers and small amphiphilic molecules capable of self-organization through photostationary and transient fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, surface plasmon spectroscopy, and optical and atomic force microscopy. He studies polymers, fatty acids, surface coupling agents, dendrimers and liquid crystals at the air/water interface and in constrained geometries on solid substrates; organic/inorganic nanocomposites; and applications of polymers in microelectronics. He is the Principal Investigator of the National Science Foundation Materials Research Science and Engineering Center on Polymer Interfaces and Macromolecular Assemblies (CPIMA).

 

Natalie Jeremijenko, New York, NY. Engineer/Artist
Jeremijenko directs the xdesign Environmental Health Clinic. Previously she was on the Visual Arts faculty at UCSD, and Faculty of Engineering at Yale. Her work was included in the 2006 Whitney Biennial of American Art and the Cooper Hewit Smithsonian Design Triennial 2006-7. She has a permanently installed Model Urban Development on the roof of Postmasters Gallery in Chelsea, featuring 7 residential housing developments, concert hall, and other public amenities, powered by human food waste where it continues to toy with new conceptions of urban futures, and re-imagine our relationship to nonhuman organisms. Her work is described as experimental design, hence xDesign, as it explores the opportunity new technologies present for non-violent social change. Her work spans a range of media from statistical indices (such as the Despondency Index, which linked the Dow Jones to the suicide rate at San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge) to biological substrates (such as the installations of cloned trees in pairs in various urban micro-climates) to robotics (such as the development of feral robotic dog packs to investigate environmental hazards). Jeremijenko is also a visiting professor at Royal College of Art, in London and an artist not-in-residence at the Institute for the Future. Palo Alto. 

 

Budi Prakosa, Bogor, Indonesia, Industrial Engineer

Prakosa is a self-taught programmer who explores various possibilities in creative programming. He started the project as a Video Jockey (VJ) with the name ‘Manticore’ in 2009, combines an interactive programming with graphical data visualization. He has a background in industrial engineering and an interest in the field of image and voice processing, video jockey, generative art, machine learning, algorithms, data mining, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the collaboration between science and art. Currently he is working on developing urbancult.net – an online visual mapping documentation on street art, and lifepatch.org citizen initiatives in the arts, science and technology

 

Andreas Siagian, Bogor, Indonesia, Industrial Engineer

Siagian is an interdisciplinary artist with a background in formal education as a civil engineer graduate of Atma Jaya University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, his activities focused on the creative community, alternative education, culture DIY / DIWO and interdisciplinary collaboration in the arts, science and technology. Since 2004, he worked with community-based initiatives and created a wide variety of installations, workshops and events and festivals held in Indonesia. Collaborative activities with local creative community involving herself as a co-founder of several initiatives such as breakcore LABS: an experimental platform for audiovisual performances, urbancult.net; visual online site for documentation and mapping of street art in Indonesia and lifepatch.org; community-based organizations that work in creative and effective application in the fields of art, science and technology.

 

Dawn Sumner, Davis, CA. Geobiologist  Sumner is a geobiologist interested in how early life evolved on Earth and whether or not Mars may have once hosted microbial life.  She explores life in many ways, ranging from describing the ancient remains of bacteria from remote areas on Earth to characterizing modern bacterial communities living in ice-covered Antarctica lakes.  She helps run the Curiosity rover on Mars and works collaboratively to develop virtual representations of data for improved scientific interpretations.  Sumner has several active collaborations, including with Tromble and Crutchfield, that integrate scientific data with novel implementations of visualization technology.  In these collaborations, the merged artistic and scientific visions provide insights that benefit both the aesthetic and technical understanding of the natural world.  Sumner also dances and plays capoeira as a means of pushing herself creatively and physically.  Sumner earned her B.S with honors at Caltech and her Ph.D. at MIT.  She is based in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Davis, where she has been a professor since 1997. 

 

 POSTSCRIPTUM IN RESPONSE TO COMMENT FROM SONYA SHERIDAN

 From Sonia Sheridan

 

CP Snow gave us a warning that was much needed. We have been acting on that. This did not make CP Snow wrong. Instead thank him for the warning!

Sonia

thanks for your comment on my blog post being wrong-
yes Snow did give a good alert- but in recent discussions i
have become impressed at how his metaphor of the two cultures
has become ingrained in peoples thinking and has actually
become an obstacle

the other problematic metaphors are
a) left brain/ right brain- recent neuroscience makes clear that this is not the
most useful way to categorise cognitive functioning
b) the tree of knowledge- as trees age they become rigid and hard to
re structure- the metaphor of the network of knowledge immediately
is dynamic and reactive
c) the third culture metaphor- the idea must be to create links not to merge
d) the concept of Kuhnian paradigm change has been widely mis interpreted (to Kuhn’s dismay)

people still disseminate CP Snow as a fact- and the reality is there is now
a large and growing creative community that is hybrid and migrates easily
across the network of knowledge

i know its a bit polemical but i do think we need to change our metaphors !

If you read C.P Snow carefully he was much more nuanced than his followers
and his focus was on development in the developing world and the need to
have civil servants that understood science and technology

– roger

7 Comments

    • Sonya

      thanks for your comment on my blog post being wrong-
      yes Snow did give a good alert- but in recent discussions i
      have become impressed at how his metaphor of the two cultures
      has become ingrained in peoples thinking and has actually
      become an obstacle

      the other problematic metaphors are
      a) left brain/ right brain- recent neuroscience makes clear that this is not the
      most useful way to categorise cognitive functioning
      b) the tree of knowledge- as trees age they become rigid and hard to
      re structure- the metaphor of the network of knowledge immediately
      is dynamic and reactive
      c) the third culture metaphor- the idea must be to create links not to merge
      d) the concept of Kuhnian paradigm change has been widely mis interpreted (to Kuhn’s dismay)

      people still disseminate CP Snow as a fact- and the reality is there is now
      a large and growing creative community that is hybrid and migrates easily
      across the network of knowledge

      i know its a bit polemical but i do think we need to change our metaphors !

      If you read C.P Snow carefully he was much more nuanced than his followers
      and his focus was on development in the developing world and the need to
      have civil servants that understood science and technology

      — roger

  1. I agree in a way with you both. It is all about metaphors. Evolving metaphors which embody the way we see the world. Physical metaphors which allow us to manipulate it. And sometimes the very metaphors we use to critique are so powerful that they trap us.

  2. Yes Roger, it is the people who come later who misrepresent the original–– If we have frozen the two-world metaphor, it is time to unfreeze it. However, as I said earlier, it is the institutions that are frozen, not the individual artists.

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