Dan Sandin tells us how to make collaboration between Artists and Scientists possible

Colleagues,
How to train collaborative teams of artists and scientists has become a hot topic. I recently was interviewed by a team led by pioneer Dan Sandin who are publishing the  forthcoming book Art Science Collaborations: A Practical Guide for Computer Graphics and Visualization (by CRC Press).

Recently the Science of Team Science group published the excellent report on Impoving the Effectiveness of Science Teams. Although their focus is science teams,  their recommendations are  also applicable to teams that combine professionals in the sciences/engineering with the Arts/Design/ Humanities:

http://www.nap.edu/catalog/19007/enhancing-the-effectiveness-of-team-science

I had the chance to record a podcast with Dan Sandin where he explains some of his perspective on Creative Disturbance:

http://creativedisturbance.org/podcast/how-to-make-collaboration-between-artists-and-scientists-possible-eng/

Art and Technology pioneer Dan Sandin discusses forty years of setting up projects which involve collaboration between artists and scientists. This is a follow up podcast to his podcast on the pioneers and pathbreakers channel where he discusses his involvement in the analog/digital transition and the video revolutions. He mentions a number of factors which in his experience have caused problems ( eg getting heavy investment from professional scientists because of promotion criteria not taking such work into account) or proved enabling such as artists working with engineering or science students. Sandin is collaborating on the production of the upcoming book Art Science Collaborations: A Practical Guide for Computer Graphics and Visualization (by CRC Press).

 

http://creativedisturbance.org/podcast/how-to-make-collaboration-between-artists-and-scientists-possible-eng/

There is a large growing literature on how to train professionals in our hybrid practices. We can only enourage universities and other training programs to include this in their curricula for the art, science, technology community.

Roger Malina