Why Roger Malina is Off the Lip ? On the wave collaborations in Plymouth

Colleagues

 

This week I am visiting Sue Denham and Michael Punt and colleagues at the University of Plymouth- they

are running the amazing COGNOVO program on cognitive innovation: http://www.cognovo.eu/ with

24 PhD students from all over europe doing PhDs all of an inter and transdisciplinary nature and

combine scientific studies of the neural correlates and mechanisms of creativity, with investigations into the role of

creativity in human cognition, and their application in sustainable technological and social innovation…fun and important and difficult work !!

 

here are details of this weeks conference: http://www.cognovo.eu/events/off-the-lip-2015.php 

Here’s what a google search image of what “off the lip’ is !! On the wave collaborations ?

off the lip

 

Off the Lip 2015: Workshop and Conference

Transdisciplinary Approaches to Cognitive Innovation

Workshops: 7-8 September
Social event and party CogJam: 10 September 2015
Conference: 9-11 September
Confirmed Plenary Speakers:
Off the Lip 2015: Workshop and Conference

Transdisciplinary Approaches to Cognitive Innovation

Workshops: 7-8 September
Social event and party CogJam: 10 September 2015
Conference: 9-11 September
Confirmed Plenary Speakers:

Amy Ione, Director of the Diatrope Institute, Berkeley, California, USA
Roger Malina, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Technology, Professor of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, USA
Sundar Sarukkai, Professor and Director of the Manipal Centre for Philosophy and Humanities, Manipal, India
The promise of cognitive innovation as a collaborative project in the sciences, arts and humanities is that we can approach creativity as a bootstrapping cognitive process in which the energies that shape the poem are necessarily indistinguishable from those that shape the poet. For the purposes of this conference the exploration of the idea of cognitive innovation concerns an understanding of creativity that is not exclusively concerned with conscious human thought and action but also as intrinsic to our cognitive development. As a consequence, we see the possibility for cognitive innovation to provide a theoretical and practical platform from which to address disciplinary differences in ways that offer new topics and concerns for research in the sciences and the humanities.
Confirmed Workshops:

Prof. Gemma Blackshaw, ‘The Art of Consumption: Picturing tuberculosis in alpine sanatoria around 1900’
Dr. Martha Blasnigg, ‘Light Image Imagination: Transdisciplinarity and Publishing in the Arts and Humanities’
Prof. James Daybell, ‘Gender, Memory and the Politics of the Early Modern Archive’
Prof. Mathew Emmett, ‘Visual Mediators: Exploring the transactional capabilities of diagrams, maps and schematic notations
Dr. Min Wild, ‘Hanging in Dreams on the Back of a Tiger: Lies, Science and the Philosophy of Metaphor’
The workshops will engage participants in the contributions made by past and current research in the Humanities in the understanding of cognition as a creative interaction with daily life, featuring case-studies and examples that will suggest how to build bridges between current trends in the cognitive sciences and established bodies of knowledge.
Amy Ione, Director of the Diatrope Institute, Berkeley, California, USA
Roger Malina, Distinguished Professor of Arts and Technology, Professor of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, USA
Sundar Sarukkai, Professor and Director of the Manipal Centre for Philosophy and Humanities, Manipal, India
The promise of cognitive innovation as a collaborative project in the sciences, arts and humanities is that we can approach creativity as a bootstrapping cognitive process in which the energies that shape the poem are necessarily indistinguishable from those that shape the poet. For the purposes of this conference the exploration of the idea of cognitive innovation concerns an understanding of creativity that is not exclusively concerned with conscious human thought and action but also as intrinsic to our cognitive development. As a consequence, we see the possibility for cognitive innovation to provide a theoretical and practical platform from which to address disciplinary differences in ways that offer new topics and concerns for research in the sciences and the humanities.
Confirmed Workshops:

Prof. Gemma Blackshaw, ‘The Art of Consumption: Picturing tuberculosis in alpine sanatoria around 1900’
Dr. Martha Blasnigg, ‘Light Image Imagination: Transdisciplinarity and Publishing in the Arts and Humanities’
Prof. James Daybell, ‘Gender, Memory and the Politics of the Early Modern Archive’
Prof. Mathew Emmett, ‘Visual Mediators: Exploring the transactional capabilities of diagrams, maps and schematic notations
Dr. Min Wild, ‘Hanging in Dreams on the Back of a Tiger: Lies, Science and the Philosophy of Metaphor’
The workshops will engage participants in the contributions made by past and current research in the Humanities in the understanding of cognition as a creative interaction with daily life, featuring case-studies and examples that will suggest how to build bridges between current trends in the cognitive sciences and established bodies of knowledge.