Micro Art Science Actions ( MASA) or a continuous conundrum, conimbrum, quonundrum,conuncrum, and quadundrum

Colleagues

HAPPY THANKSGIVING in the USA- though we always have misgiving about giving thanks to our colonial ancestors who decimated the indian
populations in “New England” !!  there must be someone else to thank in our cultures !

I would like to draw your attention to the current YASMIN WWWASP discussion (the Who, what where of our artscience community of practice- Led by Guillermo Munoz with several colleagues across the world (see at end of this post.

The discussion is now open to any colleague on the yasmin list- we look forward to your thoughts: If you arent on YASMIN: https://ntlab.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions_ntlab.gr

i just posted this to YASMIN

I would like to pick up on Salome Cuesta proposal for ‘micro-actions’ in our
art-science communities of practice, and Diamond Berverly’s  idea of
a ‘continous conundrum ( see below)

After 30 years as Executive Editor of Leonardo, for the first time I am
now deeply engaged as a practitioner in art science collaborations. I
like to joke that astrophysics was so easy ! We all agreed on the success criteria and used the same concepts, methods and terminology. Plus we were very well funded in comparison with artscience research.


 Thanks to Guillermo Munoz and colleagues at the University of Valencia I received a PhD in Art, so I am now an artscience ‘postdoc’ with a phd in astrophysics and a phd in art !

As James Leach pointed out in his Leonardo article (Extending Contexts, Making Possibilities: An Introduction to Evaluating the ProjectsJames Leach https://cnrs.academia.edu/JamesLeach   ) many many art science collaborations ‘fail’ in achieving  their original objectives.

In our artscilab  (  https://artscilab.atec.io/ )we have been arguing that there is a very big step between inter/multi disciplinary collaborations and ‘trans’ disciplinary collaborations which bridge very very different disciplines with very very different personal and collective success criteria, and very very  different often
contractictory methods, concepts , terminologies-

these are in Diamond Berverly’s term ‘conundral;- see merriam webster

“The exact origin of conundrum isn’t known with certainty. What is known is that the word has been in use since the early 1600s, and that it had various spellings, such as conimbrum, quonundrum,conuncrum, and quadundrum, before the current spelling was finally established sometime in the mid-17th century. One theory of origin suggests that the word was coined as a parody of Latin by students at Oxford University, where it appears to have enjoyed particular popularity in its “word play” or “pun” sense. While the prevalent sense in this century is that of the seemingly unanswerable question or problem, frequently applied to heady dilemmas involving ethics, sociology, or economics, the word is sometimes so loosely applied to anything enigmatic as to be synonymous with puzzle or mystery.”

One of the strategies we have been trying is “micro-projects” in cuesta’s terminology- we define them as short duration ( weeks), projects which require no money or cash, only gift exchange of time and access to facilities, expertise etc ( the gift exchange vocabulary comes from James Leach )

In the ArtSciLab we are approached continuously by ‘stem’ professionals who want to collaborate. Interestingly these range from physcial sciences and engineering to the brain and Behavioural sciences to business…


Often “they” have antiquated ideas of what making art involves or results in today. Often they view art as less primary in the ‘tree of knowledge” ( ie in a branch not in the trunk). (art in the service of science)

Often they have very different methods , concepts, terminology ( we are trying to develop transdisciplinary apprenticeships as part
of the approach). Mauricio Meijia at ASU and colleagues are currently submitting a workshop proposal on applying translation studies methods to transdisciplinary collaborations.

If a micro-project doesnt succeed, its likely that a significant project wont in our experience.

I am delighted that a student research in our artscilab , Diamond Beverly, has proposed:
“how do we go about including diverse voices and fostering heterogeneous approaches instead unconsciously
excluding people from the conversation and thus creating a continuous conundrum.” which highlighs the implicit bias of the artscience community towards people in academia with its ethnic, gender, socio-economic and other implicit social biases.

maybe the younger members of yasmin should weigh in, just as

from diamon berverly:

I was very intrigued with your post last week when you  emphasized
educational spaces and work shop methodologies. I would like to know
how you define micro-actions. I also find such maker spaces and
hackathons a good step into the future of collaborative educational
space. A question that persists however is how these spaces find their
audience?

And by this I mean how do we go about including diverse
voices and fostering heterogeneous approaches instead unconsciously
excluding people from the conversation and thus creating a continuous
conundrum.

so all latin  students on yasmin go at it :
One theory of origin of ‘conundrum” suggests that the word was coined as a parody of Latin by students at Oxford University, where it appears to have enjoyed particular popularity in its “word play” or “pun” sense. While the prevalent sense in this century is that of the seemingly unanswerable question or problem, frequently applied to heady dilemmas involving ethics, sociology, or economics, the word is sometimes so loosely applied to anything enigmatic as to be synonymous with puzzle or mystery.


Or maybe living in a continuous conundrum is a desirable state ? certainly it is a statethat drives our artscience work and is generative of desired outcomes.


Roger Malina

and HAPPY THANKSGIVING in the USA- though i always have misgiving about giving thanks to our colonial ancestors who decimated the indian
populations !!  there must be someone else to thank in our cultures !

P.S These are the invited discussants:

  • Jadwiga Charzynska: I am the director of LAZNIA CCA in Gdansk since 2004 and in our program, one of the most important points is the Art + Science Meeting project, which we organize regularly from 2011. It’s really unique program in Poland presented Art / Sci projects.

Links: http://www.laznia.pl/instytucja/

  • Joao Silveira: Brazilian entrepreneur, choreographer and pharmacist. Was a Harvard Fellow (Le Laboratoire/ 2017-2019) and currently is a research fellow at the ArtSciLab – UT Dallas, and CienciArte Lab – Fiocruz.
  • Jing Chen: Associate professor of Arts and associate director of Art and Cultural Innovation and Creativity Lab of Nanjing University.
  • Gustavo Ariel Schwartz.: Physicist and writer. Scientist of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) at the Materials Physics Center. Founder director of the Mestizajes Program, at the Donostia International Physics Center, whose purpose is to explore and cross the borders among Art, Science, Literature and Humanities.


Can creativity in Zero Gravity help us solve hard problems on earth ?

CREATIVE PERFORMANCE IN ZERO GRAVITY ??

Kathryn Hays and Roger Malina are working on an article for a forthcoming book :  Creative Performance in Extreme Human Environments: Astronauts and Space. (Editor Herie De Vries)

We would be delighted to involve anyone interested. Contact roger.malina@utdallas.edu

As humans expand on their exploration of the universe, the need to understand creative performance in extreme human environments increases. Within a multivariate theory of creativity, the environment contributes to creative potential. 


This new research area is substantiated by existing studies on space-related issues that astronauts frequently encounter, such as extreme temperatures and social isolation. This Research Topic aims to relate this to findings within the domain of creativity research, thereby opening a new avenue for future research. We particularly encourage contributions focusing on cultural, cognitive, and social-emotional issues.

CREATIVITY IN OUTER SPACE TO HELP SOLVE PROBLEMS ON EARTH ?
The following are examples of creativity and space-related issues, which this Research Topic aims to review:
1) Temperatures of the space environment:
Research shows that the temperature in space has a cognitive impact, particularly on affect and selective attention. Both emotion and attention play a crucial role in the creative process.
2) Astronaut’s circadian rhythm in space:
Studies show that a disrupted circadian rhythm results in irritability, and loss of concentration, and motivation. How does this impact creative motivation?
3) Astronaut’s overwhelming emotions in space:
Do overwhelming emotions, and `a sense of wonder’, have a positive or negative effect on creative performance?
4) Astronaut’s collaborative creativity in confined spaces and conflict resolution:
Wellbeing studies indicate that collaborative creative processes might enhance conflict resolution or vice versa.
5) Multicultural astronaut/cosmonaut teams:
The new field of cultural differences in creativity is related to cultural differences in emotions. Multicultural teams might differ in abilities of finding creative solutions, and outcomes might differ as well.
6) Effect of isolation on emotional regulation during long duration flights:
Emotion regulation is at the core of the creative process. How does the space environment influence emotion regulation and therefore creative potential?



wwwasp: the who, what where of our artscience community of practice- lets trans-logue on YASMIN

Announcing a YASMIN discussion with an international group of exprt discussants October 28th and will be moderated by Guillermo Muñoz, Spanish physic researcher working in the fields of Nanotechnology and Quantum Photonics, with a number of invited

The YASMIN moderators are pleased to announce our next discussion on the Yasmin Discussion list:

https://ntlab.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions_ntlab.gr

“The Who/When/Where/Why of the today Art/Sci Practices”

The actual Art/Sci collaborative landscape includes more and more actions between consolidated institutions and alternatives spaces. Art/Sci practice is impacting the well stablished academic research activity, principally driven by universities and technology centres and companies, where private and public funding from research programs and agencies is getting used to promote the collaboration between artist and scientist. There are new founding opportunities from consolidated research agendas or many important Art/Sci residencies all over the planet. Inside the science, research it is starting to advocate for the transdisciplinary relations, where some of the higher impact specialized research journals are dedicating particular spaces to start to study them, just following the main work started many decades ago by the reference journal Leonardo. The join action can be understood as a “redesigning science” program. However, in the day by day practice much of the Art/Sci activity is happening just in side-places, leaded by different associations and cultural groups, many times as a result of personal activity, where processes like self-learning, peer-learning in workshops or DIY meetings are producing “micro-negociations” between different cultural contexts and group roots. In both the institutional and side-place realities, one of the principal returns is materialized as new and shared educational resources, which helps to re-define our mutual conception of what is culture and who is participating on it. In our discussion we will try to get some answers about the following questions: 

– Which are the actual places and context where artists and scientist are engaged and shared their work in collaboration?

– In this context of mutual collaboration, how the artists and scientist get their scientific and artistic knowledge? (self-teaching – peer-teaching :: workshops – conferences -DIY meetings)

– How are affecting our cultural differences to these actions? (geographical: latin-african-anglo-asian :: Urban-Rural).

– Which are the mechanisms and the scenarios where scientist and artists materialize the learning process from each other?

– Who is becoming the user and the actor in these actions? And who are the actors that are not present? 

The discussion will start on next October 28th and will be moderated by Guillermo Muñoz, Spanish physic researcher working in the fields of Nanotechnology and Quantum Photonics, with a number of invited discussants: 

  • Jadwiga Charzynska: I am the director of LAZNIA CCA in Gdansk since 2004 and in our program, one of the most important points is the Art + Science Meeting project, which we organize regularly from 2011. It’s really unique program in Poland presented Art / Sci projects.

Links:

http://www.laznia.pl/instytucja/

  • Joao Silveira: Brazilian entrepreneur, choreographer and pharmacist. Was a Harvard Fellow (Le Laboratoire/ 2017-2019) and currently is a research fellow at the ArtSciLab – UT Dallas, and CienciArte Lab – Fiocruz.
  • Jing Chen: Associate professor of Arts and associate director of Art and Cultural Innovation and Creativity Lab of Nanjing University.
  • Gustavo Ariel Schwartz.: Physicist and writer. Scientist of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) at the Materials Physics Center. Founder director of the Mestizajes Program, at the Donostia International Physics Center, whose purpose is to explore and cross the borders among Art, Science, Literature and Humanities.

Links:

Personal web page: https://cfm.ehu.es/schwartz/

Mestizajes web page http://www.mestizajes.es

  • Raúl Abeledo: Faculty of Economics (University of València). Researcher on cultural planning, environmental sustainability and local development. Amateur artist since 20 years ago (painter and songwriter).

Links:

Trans-Making project: https://trans-making.eu/ 

  • Vicki Sowry: Director of the Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT). 

Links: http://www.anat.org.au/ 

  • Salome Cuesta: Member of the FECYT-Art/Science/Technology group. Co-Author of the White Paper on the interrelationship between Art, Science and Technology in Spain 2006. 

Links:

Basic artistic interest: light/time installations.  http://bit.ly/33p0Ifp

Last projects:  visibility of women in Art/Science/Technology (Invisibility Memory: http://bit.ly/2yQUBDg & STEAM Women, under study: http://bit.ly/2yXa1FW )

Commitment as a teacher in Art/Science debates: http://bit.ly/2BaiuXK 

Short CV: https://www.medialab-prado.es/personal/salome-cuesta 

All Yasminers are welcome to join us. We hope we would share interesting ideas with the aim to develop a fruitful discussion.

This is a discussion designed by the YASMIN moderator team, and co-sponsored by Leonardo/ISAST and OLATS and the Univeristy of Athens.

Celebrate the 500th anniversary of Leonardo’s passing UCLA Oct 18/19 2019

Colleagues

I am on my way to los angeles for the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo Da Vinci. Hope to see you there. I will be speaking on Saturday. Here is the fascinating schedule: https://cmrs.ucla.edu/conference/leonardo/schedule/

On May 2, 1519, a great mind was extinguished. Leonardo da Vinci, polymath and true genius of the Renaissance left this world. Recognized as unique and special in his own time as well as our own, Leonardo’s paintings were highly sought after and his skills in engineering and hydrodynamics placed him in a category apart from his fellow artists. His private notebooks on scientific, anatomical, and engineering studies reveal a gifted endlessly enquiring mind that has caught the imagination of today’s scholars in many disciplines.

“Leonardo da Vinci, Inventing the Future” takes place on October 18-19, 2019, at UCLA’s California NanoSystems Institute.

Organized by

  • Noel G. Boyle (Professor of Medicine/Cardiology, UCLA)
  • Massimo Ciavolella (Professor of Italian and Comparative Literature, UCLA)
  • Morteza Gharib (Professor of Aeronautics and Bioinspired Engineering, Caltech)
  • Victoria Vesna (Professor of Design and Media Arts; Director, Art|Sci Center, UCLA)
  • Francis Wells (Cardiac Surgeon, Royal Papworth Hospital and Cambridge University, UK)

This conference is jointly presented by the UCLA Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies,  UCLA Cardiac Arrhythmia Center – David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, UCLA  Art I Science Center, and Caltech.

Rather than simply celebrating Leonardo’s life, works, and scholarship, this conference approaches Leonardo’s influence in a novel way, musing on how Leonardo himself might have reflected on this auspicious anniversary. His desire for new knowledge and understanding would have driven him to look forwards rather than back.

To that end, this conference takes as its starting point four foci of Leonardo’s work—Flight, the Heart, Robotics & Artificial Intelligence, and the Environment—and looks into the future and what may be waiting for mankind as our knowledge and impulse to explore the unknown unfolds over time.

The conference will be accompanied by an exhibition of relevant facsimiles of Leonardo’s drawings matched with photographs of contemporary dissections and modern artistic works from the Department of Artistic Anatomy of the Academy of Fine Arts in Venice. Items from the Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana in the UCLA Library Special Collections will also be on display. Additionally, a film on the life of Leonardo will be shown courtesy of the Italian Cultural Institute of Los Angeles.

Our hope is that through this innovative program we will use the inspiration and example of Leonardo to re-ignite the enthusiasm for research and challenge in this generation and the next, and to develop the most distinguishing of human features, the enquiring and challenging mind.

Blindfolded Texas chess grand-champion wins chess games blindfolded: just listening to the designed sounds of the pieces and moves

It is with amazement that we report that Zura Javakhadze, https://ratings.fide.com/card.phtml?event=13603647 Texas grand master chess champion, in rehearsal was able to win three games totally blindfolded with no-one whispering in his ear.

Scot Gresham Lancaster, Sharath Chandra Ram and the Data Stethoscope team used our theoretical taxonomy of data sonification.(details below).

Each piece had a different sound, as does each square, on the board. Zura learned rapidly to recognise the sounds andwas able to beat three people in chess games, just by listening to the sounds of their and his moves.

PLEASE COME TO THIS PERFORMANCE IN DALLAS IN 4 HOURS !

To our knowledge this is the first time that data sonification has been used to win chess; beyond this it demonstrates our claim that you can hear things you cannot see in the data. This proof of concept will serve us well as we expand our data sonification to various applications.

Our business applications work is led by UTDallas Judd Bradbury; he has demonstrated that business students are able to hear key information in the data, that they cannot notice in the data visualisation. He has applied this to stock market data, opinion polls as well as more specific business data.

In the audience this evening will by Dr Gagan Wig of the Center for Vital Longevity.; he will be playing chess against the blinded grandmaster. Gagan was the leader of our team, with funding from DARPA and the O’Donnell family of dallas, that initiated the project at UTDallas. In that case we demonstrated that one could sonifify fMRI data on human brains. And that you could distiguish the brain connectome of an older healthy adult compared to a young healthy adult just by listening to the data.

We would like to acknowledge the crucial contributions of the numerous members of the ArtSciLab Transdisciplinary team including: Tim Perkis, Andrew Blanton, Cassini Nazir, Kristen Duepree, Shruti Ayloo, Vina Somareddy, Anvit Srivastav, Michela Chan, Neil Savalia, Paul Fishwick, Mihai Nadin, Frank Dufour, Carlos Aiken, Adnan Syed, Linda Anderson, Jacob Hunwick, Kathy Gresham-Lancaster and others in the UTD ATEC ArtSciLab.

We note that the performance this evening is a benefit for the for the Vogel Alcove homes for homeless children. Sadly Dallas one of the richest cities on the planet, has a growing and unacceptable number of homeless people.

The Data Stethoscope software has immediate applications for partially sighted people and will allow users to hear information in the data that they cannot see.

Putting Theory into Practice- blinded chess grandmaster zura javakhadre Oct 5 in Dallas

Please come to our re-imagining chess performance in honor of john cage and marcel duchamp

details: http://malina.diatrope.com/2019/09/17/oct-5-you-are-invited-to-play-chess-against-blindfolded-texas-chess-champion-zurabi-javakhadre-in-dallas/

And we are proud to announce the publication of our Grey Paper which provides the theoretical taxonomy for the ways we will be sonifying the data from the digital chess board- this is part of our initiative with the dallas esports industry , in this case echess

We carry our artmaking and performances as part of our research methodology- we will be analysing the performance to see what innovations resulted that will be useful for the business community and others that are beginning to use our data stethoscope software

Ways of Listening for Information: A Vague Taxonomy of Sonification Techniques

Authored by Scot Greshman-Lancaster (with co-authors Sharath Chandra Ram and Roger Malina), this paper discusses a rough taxonomy of data sonification methods. It summarizes the discoveries and results of ongoing in-depth exploration in this area of research, and uses some of the ArtSciLab’s own modules based on this taxonomy to allow listeners of data and users of machines to make better, faster decisions and help distribute these techniques on a larger scale.

Scot Gresham-Lancaster: Ways Of Listening v. 1.01Tagged publicationWhite Paper

Geologist James Carter , expert on moon minerals, died yesterday

Colleagues

It is with sadness that we inform you of the passing of Dr James Carter. Among other discoveries, Carter examined thousands of samples of moon dust that were brought back to earth and was the expert on how minerals were formed on the moon. Because of the very different history of the moon and the earth, he was able to discover new forms of minerals.

On last Friday we were privileged to have Carter speak to the ATEC ArtSciLab Watering Hole Seminar about his unfinished research projects. He electrified the audience, aged 16 to 70 about some minerals with strange forms that were still unexplained; he generously offered to share the data with the artists and scientists in the audience. We proposed to collaborate with him to understand the mysterious minerals shaped like small rectangular pillars , with spherical forms on top of them; using artscience collaboration. I hope they will be named after him once their formation and nature is understood. And new building structures and sculpures are made that are inspired by these un explained extraterrestial minerals

Here is a photos of James Carter taken at the salon at the home of Linda Anderson after the watering hole; the night before he died.

For me his talk was an emotional moment. He was a striking exemplar of the new sciences made possible thanks in large part to the Caltech rocket scientists led by Theodore Von Karman, Frank Malina and colleagues who went on to found NASA JPL and Aerojet General. The peaceful exploration of outer space by scientists was their goal. And now a new generation of civilian and citizen rocket scientists are at work.

Yes geology is now an extraterrestial science: Carter was like a new
Theophrastus , the aAthenian who made the greatest progress in antiquity in his work On Stones. He described many minerals and ores both from local mines such as those at Laurium near Athens, and further afield. He also quite naturally discussed types of marble and building materials like limestones, and attempted a primitive classification of the properties of minerals by their properties such as hardness.

Again with Carter’s studies of moon dust, geology is a new science.

Roger Malina
For more info on Carter’s career read below
Download

Oct 5 :YOU are invited to play chess against blindfolded Texas Chess Champion Zurabi Javakhadre in Dallas

Announcing Re-Imagining ChessNine Evenings Reunion 3  Oct 5 2011 

Nine Evenings Three: Theater and Engineering 

GOOD MOVES: A group exhibition and auction dedicated to the game of chess September 6—October 5, 2019  Press Release The Power Station, Dallas  is proud to present ‘Good Moves’, an exhibition dedicated to the game of chess. ‘Good Moves’ features artist made chess sets and other chess related artworks, that further develop the aesthetic legacy of the game, while collectively serving a worthy purpose. All works included in ‘Good Moves’ are to be auctioned at the close of the exhibition to endow a chess program at Vogel Alcove*, a Dallas-based, non-profit organization on a mission to help young children overcome the lasting and traumatic effects of homelessness. The auction is open. Attendance at the oct 5 performance is free 

The Re-Imagining Chess performance led by the UTD ArtSciLab will be Saturday October 5th at the Power Station Gallery, Dallas ,

Background: Recently ATEC Dean Anne Balsamo https://atec.utdallas.edu/content/anne-balsamo/, presented a proposal for the four pillars of excellence of our new school of Art Technology and Emerging Communication: https://atec.utdallas.edu/  

These are the result of three years of consultation and ideation among the 50 faculty and 1500 students of the school. The co-design has been carried out together with other schools in the university and the university administration, as well as our local community of for profit, non-profit, civic organizations, schools and other communities of practice. 

The four pillars of this proposed taxonomy of excellence for ATEC are: 

  • Ethics, Technology and Community Engagement 
  • Designing Culture 
  • Innovative demonstration of emerging technologies 
  • Creative Technologies Research 

As with all taxonomies there is no best taxonomy, but many good ones depending on the context. Other organizations have other ways of framing their values and ideas about what excellence could be. These are not intended to be slogans, but rather thinking tools, open to critique and evolution. In the ArtSciLab we are currently using Terry Irwin’s Transition Design Methods:   

And in particular we use artmaking as a research method to improve our data sonification software, Data Stethoscope. We have developed new ways of converting data into sound  https://artscilab.atec.io/projects/data-stethoscope  for general use in helping people make quicker and better decisions. 

DataStethoscope allows you to hear information in the data that cannot be easily visualised. 

Our ArtSciLab collaborators and members would be interested in your critiques and divergent thoughts- email to roger.malina@utdallas.edu 

One comment that came in was that the “Designing Culture”, in the singular, went against one of our lab’s explicit values of heterogeneity. Heterogeneous groups will come up with different ideas, often better ones, than homogeneous ones.   We need more than one culture.

This has been researched and documented by the science of team science .https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/65/7/639/258550  

 This leads to our belief that there are not “best” practices but that there are many “good“ practices that are context dependent.  

So “designing cultureS” might better embody the value of heterogeneity than “Designing Culture” in the singular. 

The possible benefits of hetero-phily rather than homo-phily are elaborated with new insights by Mathew O. Jackson in his new book “The human network; How your social position determines your power, beliefs and behaviors. https://www.amazon.com/Human-Network-Position-Determines-Behaviors-ebook/dp/B073YTX8TM  

Jackson draws on the most current sciences of network and sciences of complexities. I insist on the plural, as he does, because there is not one science of networks but several. 

 I note that ATEC art historian Max Schich has demonstrated the validity of this theoretical approaches to new kinds of art histories that use network analysis of data ( https://atec.utdallas.edu/content/schich-maximilian/ ) published in Nature A Network Framework of Cultural History (Science Magazine, 2014) _) 

If this sounds terribly academic, we are going through preparations for the art performance as a research method for Data Stethosope https://artscilab.atec.io/projects/data-stethoscope   and we hope to address how we contribute to each of the four pillars of ATEC.

On October 5, Saturday in Dallas, Texas we will be performing an interactive multimedia performance, which hopefully demonstrates how we practice how we theorize. It is entitled:  

RE-IMAGINING CHESS: NINE EVENINGS REUNION THREE. 

The team is led by Scot Gresham Lancaster (http://scot.greshamlancaster.com/  colleagues and friends. It will be performed at the Dallas Power Station Gallery  ( http://powerstationdallas.com/ ) as part of the Good Moves art exhibit: 

GOOD MOVES

A group exhibition and auction dedicated to the game of chess September 6—October 5, 2019 Press Release The Power Station is proud to present ‘Good Moves’, an exhibition dedicated to the game of chess. ‘Good Moves’ features artist made chess sets and other chess related artworks, that further develop the aesthetic legacy of the game, while collectively serving a worthy purpose. All works included in ‘Good Moves’ are to be auctioned at the close of the exhibition to endow a chess program at Vogel Alcove*, a Dallas-based, non-profit organization on a mission to help young children overcome the lasting and traumatic effects of homelessness. The auction is open. 

The reimagined chess playing will be led by  ArtSciLab Texas Chess Grand Champion Zura Javakhadze) ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/zurability/ ). 

Zura will be playing blindfolded against members of the audience. Each move and board position will be converted to sound using techniques of data sonification based on the ArtSciLab Taxonomy of DataSonification . ( we can provide this white paper on request) .One possible application of this innovative demonstration of emerging technologies will be to help humans that are differently abled in their vision cognitive and observational skills; we hope to use these approaches on our new esports research on cyber-athletes. 

The ArtSciLab Data Stethoscope project ( https://atec.utdallas.edu/content/data-stethoscope/), initially funded or supported by DARPA, Microsoft, the Edith O Donnell Foundation and others, is now in experimental trials in applications ranging from business analytics to medical diagnostic imaging. Yes we are looking for funding. 

The ArtSciLab at UTD Dallas ( https://artscilab.atec.io/ ) was established in 2013/14 by Cassini Nazir and myself at the behest of Tom Linehan ( https://atec.utdallas.edu/content/linehan-thomas/ ) . We take this opportunity to acknowledge the vision and enthusiasm that Tom has shared and infected us with through his own networks of friends and colleagues. 

Oh yes. Why Re-Imagining Chess: REUNION THREE ? 

Reunion 1; was a chess game during Nine Evenings ; Theater and Engineering 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9_Evenings:_Theatre_and_Engineering

between Marcel Duchamp and John Cage using the first electronic chess board in 1968. ( https://hyperallergic.com/424124/marcel-duchamp-john-cage-reunion-chess-toronto/ )  

Reunion TWO was performed in Seattle in 2018 by our team led by Scot  

https://artscilab.atec.io/blog/marcel-cage-and-john-duchamp-perform-reunion-at-nine-evenings-2-in-seattle  , Gagan Wig, Tim Perkis, Andrew Blanton and myself, 

This blog post developed in collaboration with Wolf Rainer whose pioneering work with children in refugee camps , https://www.worldcat.org/title/primacy-of-practical-action-schools-for-refugee-children-in-a-time-of-national-emergency/oclc/34121386 , is an exemplar of pillar 1. 

Critique from Wolf Dieter Peter Rainer: 

Roger, 

I appreciate your mentioning of my education work with displaced Indo-Chinese refugee communities (Khmer and Sino-Khmer) on the Thai-Cambodian border. 

First of all, the very words: ‘designing culture(s)’ makes my hair stand up on end as the phrase reeks of a kind of ‘hybris’(hubris ?) which only people who don’t know the meaning (and history) of the meaning of words (etymology) could possibly come up with. 

Did Martin Luther want to design or re-design culture? Probably not. or maybe yes, depending on what you mean by culture (and the Catholic church). 

Did Claudius (aka Julian the Apostate) want to design or re-design culture? Maybe yes, maybe no, again, it depends what you mean by culture. In this case, antiquity and Christianity were already a hybrid Culture with a capital ‘C’. 

Probably, if you want to “design or re-design” culture’, you have to try to influence and have control of institutions (Kuhn, et. Al). 

Did Martin Luther King ‘re-design’ culture? Probably yes, but not for long and certainly not without the assist of Lyndon B. Johnson. 

When I found myself in a refugee camp in a Thai border area no-man’s land with a displaced Cambodian population of some 80.000 persons, locked into  a space of perhaps 25 football fields, certainly, whatever the meaning of ‘culture’ may  be, the Cambodian refugees knew what it meant: Cambodian language schools, Cambodian Buddhist temples, etc. 

It seems to me that what some people think of when they speak of ‘designing culture’ is basically about designing gadgets (which may change a culture, to be sure): the steam engine, stone age tools, bronze age tools, gun powder, digitalisation, etc. 

If Francisco Pizarro in 1532 hadn’t brought his guns, horses and his roman catholic spanish culture to Peru, the Aztecs might have had a better chance to keep on designing ‘their own culture’ as they saw fit. Whoever survived Pizarro’s visit was only able to pass on a crude re-semblance of what they had before. 
 

In the USA, the modern pre-occupation with ‘culture’ began with Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict and Margaret Meade, et. al. They introduced the terms and the academic disciplines of ‘cultural anthropology’ and ‘social anthropology’ in the US. They redefined ‘culture’ both with a small and a big ‘C for most Americans, especially those persons who are now in the Seventies. 

Was puberty a testosterone-driven biological given for all human beings?  No, said Margaret Meade, after studying Samoan teenagers. Did she change the nature-nurture debate. Yes. Did she change the culture? Who knows? Probably some sexual mores. Cultural change may take a very long time, and then again, maybe not. Institutions and governments in power often manage quick changes. See the reformation, but then again, there came the ‘restoration’, depending who was next in power. 

There is an interesting article by Louis Menand in the August 26th 2019 issue of the New Yorker on the subject of ‘culture’ and the US culture wars. It’s a review of Charles King’s new book ‘Gods of the Upper Air’. 

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/08/26/how-cultural-anthropologists-redefined-humanity

According to my taste, we should bake smaller ‘muffins’ in our discussion of  designing or re-designing ‘culture’ or ‘the history of ideas, etc.’ 

Making a ‘contribution to knowledge’ used to be a good-enough purpose in academia. I think we should keep it that way 

Wolf Rainer 

Re-Imagining Chess: Reunion 3: A multimedia experimental AI chess performance in Dallas Power Station art gallery

Watch this space- on october 5 saturday 2019 in dallas texas

On october 5 you are invited to the experimental multimedia AI assisted performance:

RE-IMAGINING CHESS at the Dallas Power Station :http://powerstationdallas.com/ as part of the Good Moves Art Exhibit. There is a public auction open to benefit the Vogel Alcove for homeless children in dallas. Texas grand master chess champion Zurabi Javakhadze will be playing blindfolded with members of the audience aided by data sonification of the chess moves using data stethoscope software developed by the artscilab. oh yes – new versions with sound will be up too-this is just to tease you..you will have to come to the performance to hear the live music and data sonification. AI software is used to assist the blinded chess player. we are also looking for blind chess players to play against the texas grandmaster chess player and encourage you to buy the artworks in the on line auction.

. roger malina

Experimental Publi-shing and Curate-ing (EXPUCU) OCTOPUS

 Experimental Publi-shing and Curate-ing (EXPUCU)     OCTOPUS

Exciting new publishing experiment by ALEXANDRA FREEMAN

https://octopus-hypothesis.netlify.com/

“What would science look like if we started again?

The idea of Octopus is to create a single place for all scientific research to be published… freely open to all to read and language agnostic.

Instead of publishing ‘papers’, the unit of publication will be smaller: a piece in the chain from problem -> hypothesis -> method/protocol -> data -> analysis -> interpretation -> real world application. “

Contact: roger.malina@utdallas.edu if you have started publishing on Octopus , we are watching how Octopus develops to see if we could adopt some of Octopus’ good practices for our own Experimental Publi-shing and Curate-ing Projects. These include http://arteca.mit.edu,

which is publishing multi-lingually and multi-modally

learn more about our Experimental Publi-shing and Curate-ing Initiative at the ArtSciLab UTDallas https://artscilab.atec.io/about

PS. this is a recommendation to an unrelated initiative