Invitation to all outer space enthusiasts to Yuri’s night in Dallas Sat April 11 2020

You and your friends are cordially invited to attend:
A Yuri’s Night Party! (yurisnight.net/about/

image.png

WHEN? Saturday April 11, 2020 from 4pm-11pm

to get an invitation email me at rmalina@alum.mit.edu

WHY?In Celebration of all Humans in Space! (+ a 70th Birthday Celebration for Roger & Christine Malina)  

and we will be displaying the work of Space Artists !

The party is in partnership with Leonardo/OLATS in Paris which is organising space workshops thanks to funding from the Carasso foundation: https://www.olats.org/space/space.php

WHERE is the Dallas party on April 11:

At: Mercado 369, Cultural Center, W Jefferson Blvd, Dallas, TX 75208

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IMPORTANT NOTESRSVP Required (Providing Names/emails)

  • Friends with children are welcome from 4pm-7pm.
  • There will be a cash bar at the event and live music.
  • Artists will be presenting various art/science installations.

From Your Hosts: We much look forward to greeting you!

rmalina@alum.mit.edu

Yuri’s Night April 11 2020 In Dallas, Texas on the way to Planet X

Colleagues

You are hereby invited ( send me an email at rmalina@alum.mit.edu) to the Dallas Yuri’s night party Saturday April 11 4pm-11pm in Dallas at
Mercado369 cultural center: 369 W. Jefferson Blvd., Oak Cliff, TX 75208 (Dallas, Texas, USA.

There will be an open mike and pop up art exhibit- if you would like to show your work contact me at rmalina@alum.mit.edu.

More info soon

And in 70 years we look forward to Yuri’s Night on Planet X https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/hypothetical-planet-x/in-depth/

Roger Malina

rmalina@alum.mit.edu

Call for Testimonials from Space Artists: Creativity in Extreme Environments ?

We are working on a project about creativity in extreme environments, specifically focusing on the work of space artists: both artists who have been in zero gravity and created artworks or performances in space, and artists who have worked with astronauts who have flown or performed the artworks in zero gravity for the artist

The work will be published as a open access White Paper and summarised

as a Book Chapter, and published on the Leonardo/OLATS web site.

This is an open call to space artists to send us a testimonial:

Roger Malina, Kathryn Hays, Cris Kubli

contact us via rmalina@alum.mit.edu

We would welcome a written testimonial from you where you talk about your experience creating space art-

  • did any new ideas develop by the people in space who made use of your space art, where zero gravity changed the nature of the ideas
  • did you come up with new ideas as a result of insights from the space art after it was realised in zero gravity

your testimonial will be published as a contribution to a white paper we will be publishing and summarised in a book chapter.

We would welcome random or organised thoughts !! of any length, format, with or without illustrations. If you have already written about this, please do send us the reference.

below is the current abstract for the paper

also suggestions of other space artists you know we should contact are welcomed

contact rmalina@alum.mit.edu

Creativity and Cognition in Extreme Environments: The Space Arts as a Case Study

Lead Authors: Kathryn Hays, Roger Malina, Cris Kubli


Abstract

Humans, like all organisms, have evolved to survive in specific environments. When such organisms are forced, or choose, to live and work in other environments they function differently, both mentally and physically. Our paper will develop the history, present practices, and future possible arts in the context of humans beyond the Karman boundary of the earth’s atmosphere. This paper will explore the space arts as a case study in creativity in extreme environments, in this special issue of journal/book. Tasks involved in extreme environments are cognitively demanding and require high physical and psychological adaptation and expertise. Cognition, not only in scientific tasks, is influenced by the context in which it is situated. To facilitate cognitive operations, such as creativity, beyond those needed for survival and safety, environmental or task context needs must be addressed and specific cognitive training developed. Viewing cognition as embodied, enacted, socially embedded, and extended provides a framework for its relationship to the environmental conditions. As cognition relates to the environment, so do cognitive processes and operations, such as perception, problem solving, and creative ideation. We develop a revised taxonomy of space arts, based on the taxonomy by Roger Malina presented at the 1990 International Astronautics Conference. We provide specific exemplars of space art in zero gravity developed by artists in space, or for use by astronauts in space.. Using examples of space art since the birth of the space age, we discuss 1) how human survival in extreme environments requires investment in the space arts to develop sustainable social cultures in zero gravity and 2) how new scientific discoveries could be consequences or examples of creative thinking driven by artists in the various types of space art. We conclude by comparing and contrasting space with other extreme environments as contexts for creativity. 

Contact: rmalina@alum.mit.edu

Jacob Hunwick, Appointed UTD ArtSciLab and Leonardo Journal Ambassador in Germany

I am pleased to announce the first UTD ATEC ArtSciLab and Leonardo Journal Ambassdor: Jacob Hunwick. He will be travelling around europe over the next 6 months, and I will be working with him regularly- please feel free to contact him and share this email and suggest people he might meet  :

He will be doing research, detailed below, for his student project, but he is also interested in networking with Leonardo folk in Germany and within medieval travel distances to bring mutual benefit from his travelling.


As you know I have described the Leonardo community as an “archipelago’ of artscience villages. In village cultures, which are networked and bottom up, travellers play a key role today ( and in the middle ages also of course) in connecting ideas, locations  and people.

Feel free to contact him and suggest people to meet and place based ideas !Jacob Hunwick <jhunwick1@gmail.com>
Roger Malina

Logo by Jacob Hunwick 

 

We rely on our legs, not motors, to travel and navigate urban environments. I seek products that involve motion and break through the 2-dimensional touch screen barrier. I seek educational tools that encourage children to learn through active motion and participation rather than passive consumption. 

While abroad, I will search for and document exemplars of health-conscious technologies from innovative urban design to integrated. 

To those interested in my research goal contact me via email at jmh170830@utdallas.edu. I look forward to traveling all around Europe in pursuit of my research goal. 

-Jacob Hunwick 

UTD ARTSCILAB Lab Ambassador Appointed  

to enable ArtSci connections Abroad 

February 2020, the University of Texas at Dallas ArtSciLab appoints Jacob Hunwick as Lab Ambassador for the duration of his study abroad program in Germany. He starts at Phillips University Marburg on February the 18th and finishes on June the 12th. In addition, lab director Roger Malina appoints Jacob as an intern representative for the Leonardo Journal in Europe. 

Jacob will work to research, discover and document exemplars of art-science and well-being. Through his studies in ATEC at UT Dallas, Jacob has found a passion for technologies that prioritize the preservation and promotion of healthy habits and lifestyles. 

Through his weekly blog posts, he will report on interviews, events, and interactions with new organizations and people related to technologies that prioritize human health. 

The following is a summary of his research interests that he will pursue and write about in his weekly blog. 

Research Goal for Lab Ambassador Position 

Ideally, interaction designers want interfaces designed for everyday use to develop into healthy habits. Unfortunately, screen-based interfaces and modern city infrastructure trends promote sedentary habits.  

Infinitely scrolling pages and endless content tunnels enable users to over-dose on screen-time. Common use of screens for education, entertainment, and leisure time encourage people to abandon physical activity. And lastly, American city infrastructures discourages walking with a hyper focus on the automobile. 

Through my research, I seek interfaces between human and modern technology that improve human well-being. I seek infrastructure that empowers us to 

To those interested in my research goal contact me via email at jmh170830@utdallas.edu. I look forward to traveling all around Europe in pursuit of my research goal. 

Create a Minor Disturbance Dec 8 to Lasso 2I/Borisov with carbon nanotube ropes

Colleagues
our friends and colleagues michael punt Rita ,Cachao, Edith Doove, Hannah Drayson  urge all of us to create a minor disturbance on Dec 8

They urge you to corral the forces of the universe together with 2I/Borisov, an interstellar comet which will be visiting the solar system (lassoos and lassos are acceptable  for texans if made of carbon nano-tubes)
Roger Malina

From: Michael Punt <michael.punt@plymouth.ac.uk>
Date: Fri, Nov 29, 2019 at 7:05 AM
Subject: A real disturbance

An Invitation to Create a Minor Disturbance [version française si-dessous]

Inspired by Charles Ives vision of spatially distributed creativity in his unfinished Universe Symphony, The Faculty of Minor Disturbances (FMD)[1] cordially invites you to create a minor disturbance as we corral the forces of the universe together with 2I/Borisov, an interstellar comet which will be visiting the solar system.

We hope that precisely at noon (12 GMT) on the 8th of December 2019, you can take a moment and collaborate with colleagues, friends or other life forms to perform a creative act in your preferred form, shape, location, way of life and reality.

We are expecting that this distributed act of creativity will adjust some of the wobbles in the planets and, consequently, the Faculty will rely on the Universe as the default witness to your contribution. However, if you would like your contribution to be included in the event website we will be happy to accommodate you and host whichever documents you may want to send us. You are also welcome to circulate this invitation between whomever you feel like.

Attached to this invitation is one of 676 anaglyphic images which were developed to begin the vibrations (they can be stabilised by viewing through red and green lenses like: bottles, plastic wraps, cinema glasses, etc). If you do join us, please enter a three digit number of your choice at http://www.trans-techresearch.net/register-a-disturbance/, and you will be able to see part of the series as a film along with the history of the Faculty. We will also send you back your personal frame from the film.  

We do hope you can join the Comet 21/Borisov, the Faculty and fellow travelers in this project to recover creativity from its earthbound parochialism.

Rita Cachao, Edith Doove, Hannah Drayson and Michael Punt

________________________________

[1] FMD has become part of the recently revived Currer Bell College (CBC) at ESADHaR Le Havre/Rouen, partner of Transtechnology Research (TTR) at Plymouth, and Seiza at Lisbon. An history of the Faculty can be read at: http://www.trans-techresearch.net/currer-bell-college-and-faculty-of-minor-disturbances/

________________________________

Invitation à créer une perturbation mineure

Inspiré par la vision de Charles Ives sur la créativité distribuée spatialement dans sa Symphonie de l’Univers inachevée, La Faculté des Perturbations Mineures (FMD)[2] vous invite cordialement à créer une perturbation mineure alors que nous entrerons en corrélation avec les forces de l’univers, avec 2I/Borisov, une comète interstellaire qui visitera le système solaire.

Nous espérons qu’à midi (12 GMT) le 8 décembre 2019, vous pourrez prendre un moment et collaborer avec des collègues, des amis ou d’autres formes de vie pour accomplir un acte créatif dans votre forme, lieu, mode de vie et réalité préférés.

Nous nous attendons à ce que cet acte de créativité répartie ajuste certaines des oscillations des planètes et, par conséquent, la Faculté s’appuiera sur l’Univers comme témoin par défaut de votre contribution. Cependant, si vous souhaitez que votre contribution soit incluse dans le site Web de l’événement, nous serons heureux de vous accueillir et d’héberger les documents que vous voudrez nous envoyer. Vous êtes également invités à faire circuler cette invitation entre qui vous voulez.

A cette invitation se trouve l’une des 676 images anaglyphiques qui ont été développées pour commencer les vibrations (elles peuvent être stabilisées en regardant à travers des lentilles rouges et vertes comme : bouteilles, emballages plastiques, lunettes de cinéma, etc.). Si vous vous joignez à nous, veuillez entrer un numéro à trois chiffres de votre choix sur http://www.trans-techresearch.net/register-a-disturbance/, et vous pourrez voir une partie de la série comme un film, ainsi que l’histoire de la Faculté. Nous vous renvoyons également votre cadre personnel du film.  

Nous espérons que vous pourrez rejoindre la Comète 21/Borisov, la Faculté et d’autres voyageurs dans ce projet pour récupérer la créativité de son parochialism terrestre (esprit de clocher appliqué à la terre entière).

Rita Cachao, Edith Doove, Hannah Drayson et Michael Punt

________________________________

[2] FMD fait partie du Currer Bell College (CBC) récemment relancé à ESADHaR Le Havre/Rouen, partenaire de Transtechnology Research (TTR) à Plymouth, et Seiza à Lisbonne. Une histoire de la Faculté peut être lue à l’adresse suivante : http://www.trans-techresearch.net/currer-bell-college-and-faculty-of-minor-disturbances/An Invitation to Create a Minor Disturbance [version française si-dessous]

Inspired by Charles Ives vision of spatially distributed creativity in his unfinished Universe Symphony, The Faculty of Minor Disturbances (FMD)[1] cordially invites you to create a minor disturbance as we corral the forces of the universe together with 2I/Borisov, an interstellar comet which will be visiting the solar system.

We hope that precisely at noon (12 GMT) on the 8th of December 2019, you can take a moment and collaborate with colleagues, friends or other life forms to perform a creative act in your preferred form, shape, location, way of life and reality.

We are expecting that this distributed act of creativity will adjust some of the wobbles in the planets and, consequently, the Faculty will rely on the Universe as the default witness to your contribution. However, if you would like your contribution to be included in the event website we will be happy to accommodate you and host whichever documents you may want to send us. You are also welcome to circulate this invitation between whomever you feel like.

Attached to this invitation is one of 676 anaglyphic images which were developed to begin the vibrations (they can be stabilised by viewing through red and green lenses like: bottles, plastic wraps, cinema glasses, etc). If you do join us, please enter a three digit number of your choice at http://www.trans-techresearch.net/register-a-disturbance/, and you will be able to see part of the series as a film along with the history of the Faculty. We will also send you back your personal frame from the film.  

We do hope you can join the Comet 21/Borisov, the Faculty and fellow travelers in this project to recover creativity from its earthbound parochialism.

Rita Cachao, Edith Doove, Hannah Drayson and Michael Punt

________________________________

[1] FMD has become part of the recently revived Currer Bell College (CBC) at ESADHaR Le Havre/Rouen, partner of Transtechnology Research (TTR) at Plymouth, and Seiza at Lisbon. An history of the Faculty can be read at: http://www.trans-techresearch.net/currer-bell-college-and-faculty-of-minor-disturbances/

________________________________

Invitation à créer une perturbation mineure

Inspiré par la vision de Charles Ives sur la créativité distribuée spatialement dans sa Symphonie de l’Univers inachevée, La Faculté des Perturbations Mineures (FMD)[2] vous invite cordialement à créer une perturbation mineure alors que nous entrerons en corrélation avec les forces de l’univers, avec 2I/Borisov, une comète interstellaire qui visitera le système solaire.

Nous espérons qu’à midi (12 GMT) le 8 décembre 2019, vous pourrez prendre un moment et collaborer avec des collègues, des amis ou d’autres formes de vie pour accomplir un acte créatif dans votre forme, lieu, mode de vie et réalité préférés.

Nous nous attendons à ce que cet acte de créativité répartie ajuste certaines des oscillations des planètes et, par conséquent, la Faculté s’appuiera sur l’Univers comme témoin par défaut de votre contribution. Cependant, si vous souhaitez que votre contribution soit incluse dans le site Web de l’événement, nous serons heureux de vous accueillir et d’héberger les documents que vous voudrez nous envoyer. Vous êtes également invités à faire circuler cette invitation entre qui vous voulez.

A cette invitation se trouve l’une des 676 images anaglyphiques qui ont été développées pour commencer les vibrations (elles peuvent être stabilisées en regardant à travers des lentilles rouges et vertes comme : bouteilles, emballages plastiques, lunettes de cinéma, etc.). Si vous vous joignez à nous, veuillez entrer un numéro à trois chiffres de votre choix sur http://www.trans-techresearch.net/register-a-disturbance/, et vous pourrez voir une partie de la série comme un film, ainsi que l’histoire de la Faculté. Nous vous renvoyons également votre cadre personnel du film.  

Nous espérons que vous pourrez rejoindre la Comète 21/Borisov, la Faculté et d’autres voyageurs dans ce projet pour récupérer la créativité de son parochialism terrestre (esprit de clocher appliqué à la terre entière).

Rita Cachao, Edith Doove, Hannah Drayson et Michael Punt

________________________________

[2] FMD fait partie du Currer Bell College (CBC) récemment relancé à ESADHaR Le Havre/Rouen, partenaire de Transtechnology Research (TTR) à Plymouth, et Seiza à Lisbonne. Une histoire de la Faculté peut être lue à l’adresse suivante : http://www.trans-techresearch.net/currer-bell-college-and-faculty-of-minor-disturbances/

________________________________

This email and any files with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the recipient to whom it is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient then copying, distribution or other use of the information contained is strictly prohibited and you should not rely on it. If you have received this email in error please let the sender know immediately and delete it from your system(s). Internet emails are not necessarily secure. While we take every care, University of Plymouth accepts no responsibility for viruses and it is your responsibility to scan emails and their attachments. University of Plymouth does not accept responsibility for any changes made after it was sent. Nothing in this email or its attachments constitutes an order for goods or services unless accompanied by an official order form.

Micro Art Science Actions ( MASA) or a continuous conundrum, conimbrum, quonundrum,conuncrum, and quadundrum

Colleagues

HAPPY THANKSGIVING in the USA- though we always have misgiving about giving thanks to our colonial ancestors who decimated the indian
populations in “New England” !!  there must be someone else to thank in our cultures !

I would like to draw your attention to the current YASMIN WWWASP discussion (the Who, what where of our artscience community of practice- Led by Guillermo Munoz with several colleagues across the world (see at end of this post.

The discussion is now open to any colleague on the yasmin list- we look forward to your thoughts: If you arent on YASMIN: https://ntlab.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions_ntlab.gr

i just posted this to YASMIN

I would like to pick up on Salome Cuesta proposal for ‘micro-actions’ in our
art-science communities of practice, and Diamond Berverly’s  idea of
a ‘continous conundrum ( see below)

After 30 years as Executive Editor of Leonardo, for the first time I am
now deeply engaged as a practitioner in art science collaborations. I
like to joke that astrophysics was so easy ! We all agreed on the success criteria and used the same concepts, methods and terminology. Plus we were very well funded in comparison with artscience research.


 Thanks to Guillermo Munoz and colleagues at the University of Valencia I received a PhD in Art, so I am now an artscience ‘postdoc’ with a phd in astrophysics and a phd in art !

As James Leach pointed out in his Leonardo article (Extending Contexts, Making Possibilities: An Introduction to Evaluating the ProjectsJames Leach https://cnrs.academia.edu/JamesLeach   ) many many art science collaborations ‘fail’ in achieving  their original objectives.

In our artscilab  (  https://artscilab.atec.io/ )we have been arguing that there is a very big step between inter/multi disciplinary collaborations and ‘trans’ disciplinary collaborations which bridge very very different disciplines with very very different personal and collective success criteria, and very very  different often
contractictory methods, concepts , terminologies-

these are in Diamond Berverly’s term ‘conundral;- see merriam webster

“The exact origin of conundrum isn’t known with certainty. What is known is that the word has been in use since the early 1600s, and that it had various spellings, such as conimbrum, quonundrum,conuncrum, and quadundrum, before the current spelling was finally established sometime in the mid-17th century. One theory of origin suggests that the word was coined as a parody of Latin by students at Oxford University, where it appears to have enjoyed particular popularity in its “word play” or “pun” sense. While the prevalent sense in this century is that of the seemingly unanswerable question or problem, frequently applied to heady dilemmas involving ethics, sociology, or economics, the word is sometimes so loosely applied to anything enigmatic as to be synonymous with puzzle or mystery.”

One of the strategies we have been trying is “micro-projects” in cuesta’s terminology- we define them as short duration ( weeks), projects which require no money or cash, only gift exchange of time and access to facilities, expertise etc ( the gift exchange vocabulary comes from James Leach )

In the ArtSciLab we are approached continuously by ‘stem’ professionals who want to collaborate. Interestingly these range from physcial sciences and engineering to the brain and Behavioural sciences to business…


Often “they” have antiquated ideas of what making art involves or results in today. Often they view art as less primary in the ‘tree of knowledge” ( ie in a branch not in the trunk). (art in the service of science)

Often they have very different methods , concepts, terminology ( we are trying to develop transdisciplinary apprenticeships as part
of the approach). Mauricio Meijia at ASU and colleagues are currently submitting a workshop proposal on applying translation studies methods to transdisciplinary collaborations.

If a micro-project doesnt succeed, its likely that a significant project wont in our experience.

I am delighted that a student research in our artscilab , Diamond Beverly, has proposed:
“how do we go about including diverse voices and fostering heterogeneous approaches instead unconsciously
excluding people from the conversation and thus creating a continuous conundrum.” which highlighs the implicit bias of the artscience community towards people in academia with its ethnic, gender, socio-economic and other implicit social biases.

maybe the younger members of yasmin should weigh in, just as

from diamon berverly:

I was very intrigued with your post last week when you  emphasized
educational spaces and work shop methodologies. I would like to know
how you define micro-actions. I also find such maker spaces and
hackathons a good step into the future of collaborative educational
space. A question that persists however is how these spaces find their
audience?

And by this I mean how do we go about including diverse
voices and fostering heterogeneous approaches instead unconsciously
excluding people from the conversation and thus creating a continuous
conundrum.

so all latin  students on yasmin go at it :
One theory of origin of ‘conundrum” suggests that the word was coined as a parody of Latin by students at Oxford University, where it appears to have enjoyed particular popularity in its “word play” or “pun” sense. While the prevalent sense in this century is that of the seemingly unanswerable question or problem, frequently applied to heady dilemmas involving ethics, sociology, or economics, the word is sometimes so loosely applied to anything enigmatic as to be synonymous with puzzle or mystery.


Or maybe living in a continuous conundrum is a desirable state ? certainly it is a statethat drives our artscience work and is generative of desired outcomes.


Roger Malina

and HAPPY THANKSGIVING in the USA- though i always have misgiving about giving thanks to our colonial ancestors who decimated the indian
populations !!  there must be someone else to thank in our cultures !

P.S These are the invited discussants:

  • Jadwiga Charzynska: I am the director of LAZNIA CCA in Gdansk since 2004 and in our program, one of the most important points is the Art + Science Meeting project, which we organize regularly from 2011. It’s really unique program in Poland presented Art / Sci projects.

Links: http://www.laznia.pl/instytucja/

  • Joao Silveira: Brazilian entrepreneur, choreographer and pharmacist. Was a Harvard Fellow (Le Laboratoire/ 2017-2019) and currently is a research fellow at the ArtSciLab – UT Dallas, and CienciArte Lab – Fiocruz.
  • Jing Chen: Associate professor of Arts and associate director of Art and Cultural Innovation and Creativity Lab of Nanjing University.
  • Gustavo Ariel Schwartz.: Physicist and writer. Scientist of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) at the Materials Physics Center. Founder director of the Mestizajes Program, at the Donostia International Physics Center, whose purpose is to explore and cross the borders among Art, Science, Literature and Humanities.


Can creativity in Zero Gravity help us solve hard problems on earth ?

CREATIVE PERFORMANCE IN ZERO GRAVITY ??

Kathryn Hays and Roger Malina are working on an article for a forthcoming book :  Creative Performance in Extreme Human Environments: Astronauts and Space. (Editor Herie De Vries)

We would be delighted to involve anyone interested. Contact roger.malina@utdallas.edu

As humans expand on their exploration of the universe, the need to understand creative performance in extreme human environments increases. Within a multivariate theory of creativity, the environment contributes to creative potential. 


This new research area is substantiated by existing studies on space-related issues that astronauts frequently encounter, such as extreme temperatures and social isolation. This Research Topic aims to relate this to findings within the domain of creativity research, thereby opening a new avenue for future research. We particularly encourage contributions focusing on cultural, cognitive, and social-emotional issues.

CREATIVITY IN OUTER SPACE TO HELP SOLVE PROBLEMS ON EARTH ?
The following are examples of creativity and space-related issues, which this Research Topic aims to review:
1) Temperatures of the space environment:
Research shows that the temperature in space has a cognitive impact, particularly on affect and selective attention. Both emotion and attention play a crucial role in the creative process.
2) Astronaut’s circadian rhythm in space:
Studies show that a disrupted circadian rhythm results in irritability, and loss of concentration, and motivation. How does this impact creative motivation?
3) Astronaut’s overwhelming emotions in space:
Do overwhelming emotions, and `a sense of wonder’, have a positive or negative effect on creative performance?
4) Astronaut’s collaborative creativity in confined spaces and conflict resolution:
Wellbeing studies indicate that collaborative creative processes might enhance conflict resolution or vice versa.
5) Multicultural astronaut/cosmonaut teams:
The new field of cultural differences in creativity is related to cultural differences in emotions. Multicultural teams might differ in abilities of finding creative solutions, and outcomes might differ as well.
6) Effect of isolation on emotional regulation during long duration flights:
Emotion regulation is at the core of the creative process. How does the space environment influence emotion regulation and therefore creative potential?



wwwasp: the who, what where of our artscience community of practice- lets trans-logue on YASMIN

Announcing a YASMIN discussion with an international group of exprt discussants October 28th and will be moderated by Guillermo Muñoz, Spanish physic researcher working in the fields of Nanotechnology and Quantum Photonics, with a number of invited

The YASMIN moderators are pleased to announce our next discussion on the Yasmin Discussion list:

https://ntlab.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions_ntlab.gr

“The Who/When/Where/Why of the today Art/Sci Practices”

The actual Art/Sci collaborative landscape includes more and more actions between consolidated institutions and alternatives spaces. Art/Sci practice is impacting the well stablished academic research activity, principally driven by universities and technology centres and companies, where private and public funding from research programs and agencies is getting used to promote the collaboration between artist and scientist. There are new founding opportunities from consolidated research agendas or many important Art/Sci residencies all over the planet. Inside the science, research it is starting to advocate for the transdisciplinary relations, where some of the higher impact specialized research journals are dedicating particular spaces to start to study them, just following the main work started many decades ago by the reference journal Leonardo. The join action can be understood as a “redesigning science” program. However, in the day by day practice much of the Art/Sci activity is happening just in side-places, leaded by different associations and cultural groups, many times as a result of personal activity, where processes like self-learning, peer-learning in workshops or DIY meetings are producing “micro-negociations” between different cultural contexts and group roots. In both the institutional and side-place realities, one of the principal returns is materialized as new and shared educational resources, which helps to re-define our mutual conception of what is culture and who is participating on it. In our discussion we will try to get some answers about the following questions: 

– Which are the actual places and context where artists and scientist are engaged and shared their work in collaboration?

– In this context of mutual collaboration, how the artists and scientist get their scientific and artistic knowledge? (self-teaching – peer-teaching :: workshops – conferences -DIY meetings)

– How are affecting our cultural differences to these actions? (geographical: latin-african-anglo-asian :: Urban-Rural).

– Which are the mechanisms and the scenarios where scientist and artists materialize the learning process from each other?

– Who is becoming the user and the actor in these actions? And who are the actors that are not present? 

The discussion will start on next October 28th and will be moderated by Guillermo Muñoz, Spanish physic researcher working in the fields of Nanotechnology and Quantum Photonics, with a number of invited discussants: 

  • Jadwiga Charzynska: I am the director of LAZNIA CCA in Gdansk since 2004 and in our program, one of the most important points is the Art + Science Meeting project, which we organize regularly from 2011. It’s really unique program in Poland presented Art / Sci projects.

Links:

http://www.laznia.pl/instytucja/

  • Joao Silveira: Brazilian entrepreneur, choreographer and pharmacist. Was a Harvard Fellow (Le Laboratoire/ 2017-2019) and currently is a research fellow at the ArtSciLab – UT Dallas, and CienciArte Lab – Fiocruz.
  • Jing Chen: Associate professor of Arts and associate director of Art and Cultural Innovation and Creativity Lab of Nanjing University.
  • Gustavo Ariel Schwartz.: Physicist and writer. Scientist of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) at the Materials Physics Center. Founder director of the Mestizajes Program, at the Donostia International Physics Center, whose purpose is to explore and cross the borders among Art, Science, Literature and Humanities.

Links:

Personal web page: https://cfm.ehu.es/schwartz/

Mestizajes web page http://www.mestizajes.es

  • Raúl Abeledo: Faculty of Economics (University of València). Researcher on cultural planning, environmental sustainability and local development. Amateur artist since 20 years ago (painter and songwriter).

Links:

Trans-Making project: https://trans-making.eu/ 

  • Vicki Sowry: Director of the Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT). 

Links: http://www.anat.org.au/ 

  • Salome Cuesta: Member of the FECYT-Art/Science/Technology group. Co-Author of the White Paper on the interrelationship between Art, Science and Technology in Spain 2006. 

Links:

Basic artistic interest: light/time installations.  http://bit.ly/33p0Ifp

Last projects:  visibility of women in Art/Science/Technology (Invisibility Memory: http://bit.ly/2yQUBDg & STEAM Women, under study: http://bit.ly/2yXa1FW )

Commitment as a teacher in Art/Science debates: http://bit.ly/2BaiuXK 

Short CV: https://www.medialab-prado.es/personal/salome-cuesta 

All Yasminers are welcome to join us. We hope we would share interesting ideas with the aim to develop a fruitful discussion.

This is a discussion designed by the YASMIN moderator team, and co-sponsored by Leonardo/ISAST and OLATS and the Univeristy of Athens.

Celebrate the 500th anniversary of Leonardo’s passing UCLA Oct 18/19 2019

Colleagues

I am on my way to los angeles for the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo Da Vinci. Hope to see you there. I will be speaking on Saturday. Here is the fascinating schedule: https://cmrs.ucla.edu/conference/leonardo/schedule/

On May 2, 1519, a great mind was extinguished. Leonardo da Vinci, polymath and true genius of the Renaissance left this world. Recognized as unique and special in his own time as well as our own, Leonardo’s paintings were highly sought after and his skills in engineering and hydrodynamics placed him in a category apart from his fellow artists. His private notebooks on scientific, anatomical, and engineering studies reveal a gifted endlessly enquiring mind that has caught the imagination of today’s scholars in many disciplines.

“Leonardo da Vinci, Inventing the Future” takes place on October 18-19, 2019, at UCLA’s California NanoSystems Institute.

Organized by

  • Noel G. Boyle (Professor of Medicine/Cardiology, UCLA)
  • Massimo Ciavolella (Professor of Italian and Comparative Literature, UCLA)
  • Morteza Gharib (Professor of Aeronautics and Bioinspired Engineering, Caltech)
  • Victoria Vesna (Professor of Design and Media Arts; Director, Art|Sci Center, UCLA)
  • Francis Wells (Cardiac Surgeon, Royal Papworth Hospital and Cambridge University, UK)

This conference is jointly presented by the UCLA Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies,  UCLA Cardiac Arrhythmia Center – David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, UCLA  Art I Science Center, and Caltech.

Rather than simply celebrating Leonardo’s life, works, and scholarship, this conference approaches Leonardo’s influence in a novel way, musing on how Leonardo himself might have reflected on this auspicious anniversary. His desire for new knowledge and understanding would have driven him to look forwards rather than back.

To that end, this conference takes as its starting point four foci of Leonardo’s work—Flight, the Heart, Robotics & Artificial Intelligence, and the Environment—and looks into the future and what may be waiting for mankind as our knowledge and impulse to explore the unknown unfolds over time.

The conference will be accompanied by an exhibition of relevant facsimiles of Leonardo’s drawings matched with photographs of contemporary dissections and modern artistic works from the Department of Artistic Anatomy of the Academy of Fine Arts in Venice. Items from the Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana in the UCLA Library Special Collections will also be on display. Additionally, a film on the life of Leonardo will be shown courtesy of the Italian Cultural Institute of Los Angeles.

Our hope is that through this innovative program we will use the inspiration and example of Leonardo to re-ignite the enthusiasm for research and challenge in this generation and the next, and to develop the most distinguishing of human features, the enquiring and challenging mind.

Blindfolded Texas chess grand-champion wins chess games blindfolded: just listening to the designed sounds of the pieces and moves

It is with amazement that we report that Zura Javakhadze, https://ratings.fide.com/card.phtml?event=13603647 Texas grand master chess champion, in rehearsal was able to win three games totally blindfolded with no-one whispering in his ear.

Scot Gresham Lancaster, Sharath Chandra Ram and the Data Stethoscope team used our theoretical taxonomy of data sonification.(details below).

Each piece had a different sound, as does each square, on the board. Zura learned rapidly to recognise the sounds andwas able to beat three people in chess games, just by listening to the sounds of their and his moves.

PLEASE COME TO THIS PERFORMANCE IN DALLAS IN 4 HOURS !

To our knowledge this is the first time that data sonification has been used to win chess; beyond this it demonstrates our claim that you can hear things you cannot see in the data. This proof of concept will serve us well as we expand our data sonification to various applications.

Our business applications work is led by UTDallas Judd Bradbury; he has demonstrated that business students are able to hear key information in the data, that they cannot notice in the data visualisation. He has applied this to stock market data, opinion polls as well as more specific business data.

In the audience this evening will by Dr Gagan Wig of the Center for Vital Longevity.; he will be playing chess against the blinded grandmaster. Gagan was the leader of our team, with funding from DARPA and the O’Donnell family of dallas, that initiated the project at UTDallas. In that case we demonstrated that one could sonifify fMRI data on human brains. And that you could distiguish the brain connectome of an older healthy adult compared to a young healthy adult just by listening to the data.

We would like to acknowledge the crucial contributions of the numerous members of the ArtSciLab Transdisciplinary team including: Tim Perkis, Andrew Blanton, Cassini Nazir, Kristen Duepree, Shruti Ayloo, Vina Somareddy, Anvit Srivastav, Michela Chan, Neil Savalia, Paul Fishwick, Mihai Nadin, Frank Dufour, Carlos Aiken, Adnan Syed, Linda Anderson, Jacob Hunwick, Kathy Gresham-Lancaster and others in the UTD ATEC ArtSciLab.

We note that the performance this evening is a benefit for the for the Vogel Alcove homes for homeless children. Sadly Dallas one of the richest cities on the planet, has a growing and unacceptable number of homeless people.

The Data Stethoscope software has immediate applications for partially sighted people and will allow users to hear information in the data that they cannot see.